21 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Composite Metal-hydrogen Electrodes for Metal-Hydrogen Batteries

Description: The purpose of this project is to develop and conduct a feasibility study of metallic thin films (multilayered and alloy composition) produced by advanced sputtering techniques for use as anodes in Ni-metal hydrogen batteries. The anodes could be incorporated in thin film solid state Ni-metal hydrogen batteries that would be deposited as distinct anode, electrolyte and cathode layers in thin film devices. The materials could also be incorporated in secondary consumer batteries (i.e. type AF(4/3 or 4/5)) which use electrodes in the form of tapes. The project was based on pioneering studies of hydrogen uptake by ultra-thin Pd-capped metal-hydrogen ratios exceeding and fast hydrogen charging and Nb films, these studies suggested that materials with those of commercially available metal hydride materials discharging kinetics could be produced. The project initially concentrated on gas phase and electrochemical studies of Pd-capped niobium films in laboratory-scale NiMH cells. This extended the pioneering work to the wet electrochemical environment of NiMH batteries and exploited advanced synchrotron radiation techniques not available during the earlier work to conduct in-situ studies of such materials during hydrogen charging and discharging. Although batteries with fast charging kinetics and hydrogen-metal ratios approaching unity could be fabricated, it was found that oxidation, cracking and corrosion in aqueous solutions made pure Nb films-and multiiayers poor candidates for battery application. The project emphasis shifted to alloy films based on known elemental materials used for NiMH batteries. Although commercial NiMH anode materials contain many metals, it was found that 0.24 ┬Ám thick sputtered Zr-Ni films cycled at least 50 times with charging efficiencies exceeding 95% and [H]/[M] ratios of 0.7-1.0. Multilayered or thicker Zr-Ni films could be candidates for a thin film NiMH battery that may have practical applications as an integrated power source for modern electronic devices.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Ruckman, M W; Wiesmann, H; Strongin, M; Young, K & Fetcenko, M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced nickel-metal hydride cell development. Final report, September 1993--March 1996

Description: Inert gas atomization using metal hydride alloys for a Ni/MH{sub x}cell was studied. Atomization of the alloys was demonstrated on a small production scale up to batch size of several kg. Relative performance of the atomized and nonatomized alloys was investigated for the electrode material in a Ni/MH{sub x} cell. The study included effects of charge-discharge rates, temperature, and particle size on cell voltage (polarization) and specific capacity. Results show that the specific capacity of the present atomized alloys was apprecialy smaller than that of the nonatomized powder, especially for initial cycles. Full activation of the atomized alloys oftentook several hundreds of cycles. However, no appreciable difference in discharge rate capability was observed with R10 and R12 alloys. Chemical compositions were indistinguishable, although the oxygen contents of the atomized alloys were always higher. Effects of Ni and Cu coating on alloy performance were studied after electroless coating; the coatings noticeably improved the electrode rate capability for all the alloys. The electrode polarization was esecially improved, but not the cycle life. Further studies are needed.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Lim, Hong S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PowerCore{trademark}, NiMH production prototype for portable electronics. Quarterly report R02

Description: The objective of this project is to build a production prototype of Power Core structural battery for applications as a hard case for portable electronic devices. The reports summarizes the work completed since the last report. It briefly describes the problems that were experienced. It also gives details of progress versus statement of work task definitions.
Date: January 30, 1998
Creator: Lyman, P.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mathematical model of a NiOOH/metal hydride cell. Final report, September 15, 1993--November 14, 1996

Description: One of the objectives of work on the nickel/metal hydride cell has been to develop a mathematical model of the performance of the cell. This is a summary of work to date and is meant to be a Final Report of the BES project. Mathematical model of the nickel/metal hydride cell depends on the kinetics, thermodynamics, and transport properties of the metal hydride electrode. Consequently, investigations were carried out to determine: (1) the exchange current density and the equilibrium potential as a function of hydrogen content in the electrode; (2) the hydrogen diffusion coefficient in the bulk of the alloy; (3) the hydrogen reaction rate order; (4) the symmetry factor for hydrogen evolution reaction and (5) to determine the reaction mechanisms of the hydrogen charge and discharge processes including overcharge and overdischarge mechanism.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: White, R.E. & Popov, B.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Composite metal-hydrogen electrodes for metal-hydrogen batteries. Final report, October 1, 1993--April 15, 1997

Description: The purpose of this project is to develop and conduct a feasibility study of metallic thin films (multilayered and alloy composition) produced by advanced sputtering techniques for use as anodes in Ni-metal hydrogen batteries that would be deposited as distinct anode, electrolyte and cathode layers in thin film devices. The materials could also be incorporated in secondary consumer batteries (i.e. type AF(4/3 or 4/5)) which use electrodes in the form of tapes. The project was based on pioneering studies of hydrogen uptake by ultra-thin Pd-capped Nb films, these studies suggested that materials with metal-hydrogen ratios exceeding those of commercially available metal hydride materials and fast hydrogen charging and discharging kinetics could be produced. The project initially concentrated on gas phase and electrochemical studies of Pd-capped niobium films in laboratory-scale NiMH cells. This extended the pioneering work to the wet electrochemical environment of NiMH batteries and exploited advanced synchrotron radiation techniques not available during the earlier work to conduct in-situ studies of such materials during hydrogen charging and discharging. Although batteries with fast charging kinetics and hydrogen-metal ratios approaching unity could be fabricated, it was found that oxidation, cracking and corrosion in aqueous solutions made pure Nb films and multilayers poor candidates for battery application. The project emphasis shifted to alloy films based on known elemental materials used for NiMH batteries. Although commercial NiMH anode materials contain many metals, it was found that 0.24 {mu}m thick sputtered Zr-Ni films cycled at least 50 times with charging efficiencies exceeding 95% and [H]/[M] ratios of 0.7-1.0. Multilayered or thicker Zr-Ni films could be candidates for a thin film NiMH battery that may have practical applications as an integrated power source for modern electronic devices.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M. & Weismann, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Role of electronic, geometric, and surface properties on the mechanism of the electrochemical hydriding/dehydriding reactions

Description: Since 1990 there has been an ongoing collaboration among the authors to investigate the role of individual elements on the thermodynamics and kinetics of hydriding/dehydriding reactions. This review article presents the electrochemical and physicochemical characteristics of hydriding/dehydriding reactions from the point of view of their dependence on electronic, geometric and surface properties of the hydride materials. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD) and scanning vibrating electrode technique (SVET) studies were based on AB{sub 5} type alloys, partially substituted by other elements. Expansion of the unit cell volume and a larger Ni d band vacancy are beneficial for increasing the amount of the hydrogen storage. XAS and SVET showed that the Ce substitution for La in an AB{sub 5} alloy enhances the lifetime of hydride electrode.
Date: March 1996
Creator: Srinivasan, S.; Zhang, W. & Kumar, M. P. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electrochemical and in situ neutron diffraction investigations of La-Ni-Al-H alloys

Description: Li/metal hydride batteries are a strong contender to replace Ni/Cd batteries. Since the role of alloying components is not yet understood, a combination of electrochemical and neutron diffraction techniques has been designed to investigate metal hydrides. In this work, several Al-substituted LaNi{sub 5} alloys were investigated for their specific capacity (measured by mAh/La and symbolized by x in LaNi{sub 5-y}Al{sub y}H{sub x}), impedance, and cycling stability. Neutron diffraction was used to study the electrochemically induced phase transformation and structure change during charge/discharge.
Date: May 1, 1996
Creator: Peng, W.; Redey, L.; Vissers, D.R.; Myles, K.M.; Carpenter, J.; Richardson et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Variation of stresses ahead of the internal cracks in ReNi{sub 5} powders during hydrogen charging and discharging cycles

Description: In this study, the evolution of the stress-states ahead of the penny shaped internal cracks in both spherical and disk shaped ReNi{sub 5} particles where Re denotes the rare earths La, Ce, and Misch-metals during hydrogen charging and discharging cycles were investigated using coupled diffusion/deformation FEM analyses. The results indicate that large tensile stresses, on the order of 20--30% of the modulus of elasticity, develop in the particles. The disk shaped particles, in addition to having faster charging/discharging cycles, may offer better resistance to fracture than the spherical particles.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Biner, S.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of advanced battery technologies for electric vehicles

Description: Battery technologies of different chemistries, manufacture and geometry were evaluated as candidates for use in Electric Vehicles (EV). The candidate batteries that were evaluated include four single cell and seven multi-cell modules representing four technologies: Lead-Acid, Nickel-Cadmium, Nickel-Metal Hydride and Zinc-Bromide. A standard set of testing procedures for electric vehicle batteries, based on industry accepted testing procedures, and any tests which were specific to individual battery types were used in the evaluations. The batteries were evaluated by conducting performance tests, and by subjecting them to cyclical loading, using a computer controlled charge--discharge cycler, to simulate typical EV driving cycles. Criteria for comparison of batteries were: performance, projected vehicle range, cost, and applicability to various types of EVs. The four battery technologies have individual strengths and weaknesses and each is suited to fill a particular application. None of the batteries tested can fill every EV application.
Date: December 1993
Creator: Dickinson, B. E.; Lalk, T. R. & Swan, D. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Synthesis and characterization of nickel hydroxide powders for battery application

Description: The primary objective of this research was to investigate the synthesis and characterization of Ni(OH){sub 2} powders by homogeneous precipitation. Previous research of the same method showed conflicting results and complete characterization of the particle morphology was not carried out. This study has produced precipitates having a composition of 2Ni(OH){sub 2}{center_dot}Ni(HCO{sub 3}){sub 1.85}(NO{sub 3}){sub 0.15}. The XRD patterns showed peaks commonly observed for {alpha}-Ni(OH){sub 2}. The precipitates produced from low and high cation concentration solutions showed that the mean particle size and specific surface area increased with aging time. The high specific surface area measured suggested that the particle growth occurred through the aggregation of nanosized crystallites. The TEM micrographs confirmed that the particles were actually aggregates of thin films or sheets that were crumpled and intertwined together. This work also investigated the effect of dispersant on the particle morphology. The addition of dispersants did not alter the density of the particles implying that the dispersants were not incorporated into the solid phase. A general decrease in mean particle size at each aging time was observed resulting in an increase in specific surface area. The use of dispersants provided steric hindrance for the particles in the solution to aggregate, thus smaller particles were observed. Cyclic voltammetric tests were carried out to see if the high surface area Ni(OH){sub 2} produced in this work had superior performance characteristics compared to the commercial powders currently available. Indeed, the study showed that the homogeneously precipitated Ni(OH){sub 2} had higher coulombic efficiency and degree of reversibility than the commercial powders. The efficiency values of all the homogeneously precipitated powders were approximately 90%. The same efficiency values observed were probably due to the same specific surface areas of the powders after aging in KOH solution.
Date: October 8, 1997
Creator: Widjaja, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microstructural characterization of a Zr-Ti-Ni-Mn-V-Cr based AB{sub 2}-type battery alloy

Description: Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), combined with X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was employed to investigate a proprietary and multicomponent AB{sub 2} type Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) battery alloy. This material was prepared by High Pressure Gas Atomization (HPGA) and examined in both the as-atomized and heat treated condition. TEM examination showed a heavily faulted dendritic growth structure in as-atomized powder. Selected Area Diffraction (SAD) showed that this region consisted of both a cubic C15 structure with lattice constant a=7.03 and a hexagonal C14 structure with lattice parameter a=4.97 {angstrom}, c=8.11 {angstrom}. The Orientation Relationship (OR) between the C14 and C15 structures was determined to be (111)[1{bar 1}0]{sub C15}//(0001)[11{bar 2}0]{sub C14}. An interdendritic phase possessing the C14 structure was also seen. There was also a very fine grain region consisting of the C14 structure. Upon heat treatment, the faulted structure became more defined and appeared as intercalation layers within the grains. Spherical particles rich in Zr and Ni appeared scattered at the grain boundaries instead of the C14 interdendritic phase. The polycrystalline region also changed to a mixture of C14 and C15 structures. These results as well as phase stability of the C15 and C14 structures based on a consideration of atomic size factor and the average electron concentration are discussed.
Date: January 1, 1999
Creator: Shi, Zhan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mathematical modeling of the nickel/metal hydride battery system

Description: A group of compounds referred to as metal hydrides, when used as electrode materials, is a less toxic alternative to the cadmium hydroxide electrode found in nickel/cadmium secondary battery systems. For this and other reasons, the nickel/metal hydride battery system is becoming a popular rechargeable battery for electric vehicle and consumer electronics applications. A model of this battery system is presented. Specifically the metal hydride material, LaNi{sub 5}H{sub 6}, is chosen for investigation due to the wealth of information available in the literature on this compound. The model results are compared to experiments found in the literature. Fundamental analyses as well as engineering optimizations are performed from the results of the battery model. In order to examine diffusion limitations in the nickel oxide electrode, a ``pseudo 2-D model`` is developed. This model allows for the theoretical examination of the effects of a diffusion coefficient that is a function of the state of charge of the active material. It is found using present data from the literature that diffusion in the solid phase is usually not an important limitation in the nickel oxide electrode. This finding is contrary to the conclusions reached by other authors. Although diffusion in the nickel oxide active material is treated rigorously with the pseudo 2-D model, a general methodology is presented for determining the best constant diffusion coefficient to use in a standard one-dimensional battery model. The diffusion coefficients determined by this method are shown to be able to partially capture the behavior that results from a diffusion coefficient that varies with the state of charge of the active material.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Paxton, B.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Benefits of rapid solidification processing of modified LaNi{sub 5} alloys by high pressure gas atomization for battery applications

Description: A high pressure gas atomization approach to rapid solidification has been employed to investigate simplified processing of Sn modified LaNi{sub 5} powders that can be used for advanced Ni/metal hydride (Ni/MH) batteries. The current industrial practice involves casting large ingots followed by annealing and grinding and utilizes a complex and costly alloy design. This investigation is an attempt to produce powders for battery cathode fabrication that can be used in an as-atomized condition without annealing or grinding. Both Ar and He atomization gas were tried to investigate rapid solidification effects. Sn alloy additions were tested to promote subambient pressure absorption/desorption of hydrogen at ambient temperature. The resulting fine, spherical powders were subject to microstructural analysis, hydrogen gas cycling, and annealing experiments to evaluate suitability for Ni/MH battery applications. The results demonstrate that a brief anneal is required to homogenize the as-solidified microstructure of both Ar and He atomized powders and to achieve a suitable hydrogen absorption behavior. The Sn addition also appears to suppress cracking during hydrogen gas phase cycling in particles smaller than about 25 {micro}m. These results suggest that direct powder processing of a LaNi{sub 5{minus}x}Sn{sub x} alloy has potential application in rechargeable Ni/MH batteries.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Anderson, I.E.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Ting, J.; Witham, C. & Bowman, R.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gas atomization processing of tin and silicon modified LaNi{sub 5} for nickel-metal hydride battery applications

Description: Numerous researchers have studied the relevant material properties of so-called AB{sub 5} alloys for battery applications. These studies involved LaNi{sub 5} substituted alloys which were prepared using conventional cast and crush alloying techniques. While valuable to the understanding of metal hydride effects, the previous work nearly ignored the potential for alternative direct powder production methods, like high pressure gas atomization (HPGA). Thus, there is a need to understand the relationship between gas atomization processes, powder particle solidification phases, and hydrogen absorption properties of ultra fine (< 25 {micro}m) atomized powders with high surface area for enhanced battery performance. Concurrently, development of a gas atomization nozzle that is more efficient than all current designs is needed to increase the yield of ultrafine AB{sub 5} alloy powder for further processing advantage. Gas atomization processing of the AB{sub 5} alloys was demonstrated to be effective in producing ultrafine spherical powders that were resilient to hydrogen cycling for the benefit of improving corrosion resistance in battery application. These ultrafine powders benefited from the rapid solidification process by having refined solute segregation in the microstructure of the gas atomized powders which enabled a rapid anneal treatment of the powders. The author has demonstrated the ability to produce high yields of ultrafine powder efficiently and cost effectively, using the new HPGA-III technology. Thus, the potential benefits of processing AB{sub 5} alloys using the new HPGA technology could reduce manufacturing cost of nickel-metal hydride powder. In the near future, the manufacture of AB{sub 5} alloy powders could become a continuous and rapid production process. The economic benefit of an improved AB{sub 5} production process may thereby encourage the use of nickel-metal hydride rechargeable batteries in electrical vehicle applications in the foreseeable future.
Date: February 12, 1999
Creator: Ting, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy and environmental impacts of electric vehicle battery production and recycling

Description: Electric vehicle batteries use energy and generate environmental residuals when they are produced and recycled. This study estimates, for 4 selected battery types (advanced lead-acid, sodium-sulfur, nickel-cadmium, and nickel-metal hydride), the impacts of production and recycling of the materials used in electric vehicle batteries. These impacts are compared, with special attention to the locations of the emissions. It is found that the choice among batteries for electric vehicles involves tradeoffs among impacts. For example, although the nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride batteries are similar, energy requirements for production of the cadmium electrodes may be higher than those for the metal hydride electrodes, but the latter may be more difficult to recycle.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Gaines, L. & Singh, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydrogen and the materials of a sustainable energy future

Description: The National Educator`s Workshop (NEW): Update 96 was held October 27--30, 1996, and was hosted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This was the 11th annual conference aimed at improving the teaching of material science, engineering and technology by updating educators and providing laboratory experiments on emerging technology for teaching fundamental and newly evolving materials concepts. The Hydrogen Education Outreach Activity at Los Alamos National Laboratory organized a special conference theme: Hydrogen and the Materials of a Sustainable Energy Future. The hydrogen component of the NEW:Update 96 offered the opportunity for educators to have direct communication with scientists in laboratory settings, develop mentor relationship with laboratory staff, and bring leading edge materials/technologies into the classroom to upgrade educational curricula. Lack of public education and understanding about hydrogen is a major barrier for initial implementation of hydrogen energy technologies and is an important prerequisite for acceptance of hydrogen outside the scientific/technical research communities. The following materials contain the papers and view graphs from the conference presentations. In addition, supplemental reference articles are also included: a general overview of hydrogen and an article on handling hydrogen safely. A resource list containing a curriculum outline, bibliography, Internet resources, and a list of periodicals often publishing relevant research articles can be found in the last section.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Zalbowitz, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrosion of AB{sub 5} metal hydride electrodes

Description: Metal hydride electrodes are an attractive substitute for the cadmium electrode in Cd/Ni batteries because of their relatively benign environmental impact and higher energy density. However, even though MH{sub x}/Ni batteries are currently competitive in certain applications, their full potential as cheap, reliable, energy storage devices is not yet realized: a severe penalty has been incurred in storage capacity and materials costs in order to inhibit corrosion and attain acceptable electrode cycle life. Currently there are two types of alloys which are useful as metal hydride electrodes, the AB{sub 5} and the AB{sub 2} classes of intermetallic compounds. Commercial AB{sub 5} electrodes use mischmetal, a low cost combination of rare earth elements. The B{sub 5} component remains primarily Ni but is substituted in part with Co, Mn, Al etc. The partial substitution of Ni increases thermodynamic stability of the hydride phase and corrosion resistance. Such an alloy is commonly written as MmB{sub 5} where Mm represents the mischmetal component; the B{sub 5} composition in commercial batteries is variable but electrodes consisting of MmNi{sub 3.55}Co{sub .75}Mn{sub .4}Al{sub .3} have good storage capacity and cycle life and most AB{sub 5} battery electrodes have a similar composition. The authors have been concerned with the function that individual components play in such an alloy with respect to lattice expansion, hydride stability, and surface passivation. Thus they have focused on the properties of a similar alloy, A(NiCoMnAl){sub 5} where A is La or La{sub 1{minus}x}Ce{sub x}. Some of their results noted here have previously appeared in separate publications; the purpose of this paper is to combine them with new data to give a more coherent and complete whole.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Adzic, G.D.; Johnson, J.R.; Mukerjee, S.; McBreen, J. & Reilly, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Total energy-cycle energy and emissions impacts of hybrid electric vehicles

Description: Argonne National Laboratory has begun an analysis of the energy and air emission impacts of hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) over the entire energy cycle, including manufacturing, operating, and recycling the vehicles and producing their fuel. Phase 1 evaluates series HEVs using lead acid and nickel metal hydride batteries, operating independent of the electricity grid and connected to it, and compares them to conventional ICE vehicles. With efficient electric components, both grid-dependent and grid-independent vehicles are more efficient than their conventional counterpart, though most of the efficiency advantage is gained in slow, lower power operation (e.g., on the federal urban driving schedule). The grid-independent HEV is not clearly superior if it operates part of each day with grid electricity. Finally, estimates of lead emissions for the lead acid battery-powered HEV are significantly lower than suggested elsewhere.
Date: September 17, 1997
Creator: Wang, M.Q.; Plotkin, S.; Santini, D.J.; He, J.; Gaines, L. & Patterson, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Exploratory battery technology development and testing report for 1989

Description: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, has been designated as Lead Center for the Exploratory Battery Technology Development and Testing Project, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. In this capacity, Sandia is responsible for the engineering development of advanced rechargeable batteries for both mobile and stationary energy storage applications. This report details the technical achievements realized in pursuit of the Lead Center's goals during calendar year 1989. 4 refs., 84 figs., 18 tabs.
Date: December 1, 1990
Creator: Magnani, N.J.; Diegle, R.B.; Braithwaite, J.W.; Bush, D.M.; Freese, J.M.; Akhil, A.A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Data base on batteries, power-conditioning equipment, and photovoltaic arrays. Final report

Description: The objective of this study was to compile an up-to-date comprehensive data base for research, design, and development of photovoltaic systems, primarily in the areas of applications and battery technology, and secondarily in the area of power conditioning and photovoltaic array technology. This volume contains the data base used to develop the end-use scenarios and identify the R and D needed for batteries to be used in photovoltaic power systems. In addition to its specific application to the present study, this data base is intended to provide state-of-the-art information to manufacturers of the various components of photovoltaic power systems, system designers, and researchers in this field. An extensive literature search was conducted to obtain technical data on batteries, power conditioners, and photovoltaic arrays. The data obtained from published technical literature and direct communication with manufacturers and developers are compiled. Principles of operation, types of systems, performance characteristics, test data, and cost data are included for each of the components. (WHK)
Date: February 1, 1981
Creator: Podder, A; Kapner, M & Morse, T
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of batteries for use in photovoltaic systems. Final report

Description: An evaluation of 11 types of secondary batteries for energy storage in photovoltaic electric power systems is given. The evaluation was based on six specific application scenarios which were selected to represent the diverse requirements of various photovoltaic systems. Electrical load characteristics and solar insulation data were first obtained for each application scenario. A computer-based simulation program, SOLSIM, was then developed to determine optimal sizes for battery, solar array, and power conditioning systems. Projected service lives and battery costs were used to estimate life-cycle costs for each candidate battery type. The evaluation considered battery life-cycle cost, safety and health effects associated with battery operation, and reliability/maintainability. The 11 battery types were: lead-acid, nickel-zinc, nickel-iron, nickel-hydrogen, lithium-iron sulfide, calcium-iron sulfide, sodium-sulfur, zinc-chlorine, zinc-bromine, Redox, and zinc-ferricyanide. The six application scenarios were: (1) a single-family house in Denver, Colorado (photovoltaic system connected to the utility line); (2) a remote village in equatorial Africa (stand-alone power system); (3) a dairy farm in Howard County, Maryland (onsite generator for backup power); (4) a 50,000 square foot office building in Washington, DC (onsite generator backup); (5) a community in central Arizona with a population of 10,000 (battery to be used for dedicated energy storage for a utility grid-connected photovoltaic power plant); and (6) a military field telephone office with a constant 300 W load (trailer-mounted auxiliary generator backup). Recommendations for a research and development program on battery energy storage for photovoltaic applications are given, and a discussion of electrical interfacing problems for utility line-connected photovoltaic power systems is included. (WHK)
Date: February 1, 1981
Creator: Podder, A & Kapner, M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department