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Pulsed Neutron Experiments With Fast Assemblies

Description: "The pulsed source technique consists of introducing repeated short bursts of neutrons into a subcritical assembly, and following the decay of the leakage flux as a function of time...It is noted that plotting the decay constant as a function of buckling gives an apparently accurate way to extrapolate to prompt critical. The pulsed source technique can also be used to calibrate control rod and poison worth, and will give some estimate of the prompt neutron lifetime."
Date: October 31, 1957
Creator: Bengston, Joel & Passell, Lawrence
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Uses of Advanced Pulsed Neutron Sources. Report of a Workshop Held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 21-24, 1975

Description: This report contains the conclusions that were drawn by nine panels of scientists in the fields of Biology; Chemical Spectroscopy; Chemical Structures of Crystalline Solids; Chemical Structures of Disordered Solids and Inhomogeneous Systems; Dynamics of Solids, Liquids, Glasses, and Gases; Magnetism; Neutron Sources; and Radiation Effects. The nine panel reports describe the applications found in these scientific areas, accompanying them with conceptual instruments designed for the measurements and with calculations to establish feasibility.
Date: 1976?
Creator: Carpenter, S. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Report US-Japan IEC Workshop on Small Plasma and Accelerator Neutron Sources

Description: Abstract The history of IEC development will be briefly described, and some speculation about future directions will be offered. The origin of IEC is due to the brilliance of Phil Farnsworth, inventor of electronic TV in the US. Early experiments were pioneered in the late 1960s by Robert Hirsch who later became head of the DOE fusion program. At that time studies of IEC physics quickly followed at the University of Illinois and at Penn State University. However, despite many successes in this early work, IEC research died as DOE funding stopped in the mid 1980s. In the early 90’s, R. W. Bussard of EMC revived work with a new major project based on a magnetic assisted IEC. While doing supportive studies for that project, G. Miley proposed a grided “STAR mode” IEC as a neutron source for NAA. This concept was later used commercially by Daimler- Benz in Germany to analysis impurities in incoming ores. This represented a first practical application of the IEC. During this period other research groups at LANL, U of Wisconsin and Kyoto University entered IEC research with innovative new concepts and approaches to IEC physics and applications. Much of this work is documented in the present and in past US-Japan Workshops. At present we stand on the threshold of a new area of IEC applications as neutron source, for isotope production, and as a plasma source. These applications provide a way to continue IEC understanding and technology development with the ultimate goal being a fusion power plant. Indeed, a distinguishing feature of the IEC vs. other fusion confinement approaches is the unique opportunity for “spin off” applications along the way to a power producing plant.
Date: June 4, 2008
Creator: Miley, George, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neutron Beams from Deuteron Breakup at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Description: Accelerator-based neutron sources offer many advantages, in particular tunability of the neutron beam in energy and width to match the needs of the application. Using a recently constructed neutron beam line at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, tunable high-intensity sources of quasi-monoenergetic and broad spectrum neutrons from deuteron breakup are under development for a variety of applications.
Date: July 31, 2007
Creator: McMahan, M.A.; Ahle, L.; Bleuel, D.L.; Bernstein, L.; Braquest, B.R.; Cerny, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

History of the ZGS 500 MeV booster.

Description: The history of the design and construction of the Argonne 500 MeV booster proton synchrotron from 1969 to 1982 is described. This accelerator has since been in steady use for the past 25 years to power the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS).
Date: May 9, 2006
Creator: Simpson, J.; Martin; R. & Kustom, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PROCEEDINGS OF THE SECOND SYMPOSIUM ON THE APPLICATION OF PULSED NEUTRON SOURCE TECHNIQUES, HELD AT THE LAWRENCE RADIATION LABORATORY, BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA, DECEMBER 4-5, 1958

Description: The papers presented at the meeting were recorded and transcripts are given along with the discussion which followed each paper. Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 13 papers presented. (W.D.M.)
Date: October 31, 1960
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A workshop on enhanced national capability for neutron scattering

Description: This two-day workshop will engage the international neutron scattering community to vet and improve the Lujan Center Strategic Plan 2007-2013 (SP07). Sponsored by the LANL SC Program Office and the University of California, the workshop will be hosted by LANSCE Professor Sunny Sinha (UCSD). Endorsement by the Spallation Neutron Source will be requested. The discussion will focus on the role that the Lujan Center will play in the national neutron scattering landscape assuming full utilization of beamlines, a refurbished LANSCE, and a 1.4-MW SNS. Because the Lujan Strategic Plan is intended to set the stage for the Signature Facility era at LANSCE, there will be some discussion of the long-pulse spallation source at Los Alamos. Breakout groups will cover several new instrument concepts, upgrades to present instruments, expanded sample environment capabilities, and a look to the future. The workshop is in keeping with a request by BES to update the Lujan strategic plan in coordination with the SNS and the broader neutron community. Workshop invitees will be drawn from the LANSCE User Group and a broad cross section of the US, European, and Pacific Rim neutron scattering research communities.
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Hurd, Alan J; Rhyne, James J & Lewis, Paul S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pre-Conceptual Design and Preliminary Neutronic Analysis of the Proposed National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS)

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a pre-conceptual design study for the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) and given preliminary approval for the proposed facility to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The pre-conceptual design of the NSNS initially consists of an accelerator system capable of delivering a 1 to 2 GeV proton beam with 1 MW of beam power in an approximate 0.5 {micro}s pulse at a 60 Hz frequency onto a single target station. The NSNS will be upgradable to a significantly higher power level with two target stations (a 60 Hz station and a 10 Hz station). There are many possible layouts and designs for the NSNS target stations. This paper gives a brief overview of the proposed NSNS with respect to the target station, as well as the general philosophy adopted for the neutronic design of the NSNS target stations. A reference design is presented, and some preliminary neutronic results for the NSNS are briefly discussed.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Johnson, JO
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utilization of Monte Carlo Calculations in Radiation Transport Analyses to Support the Design of the U.S. Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) has given the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) project approval to begin Title I design of the proposed facility to be built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and construction is scheduled to commence in FY01 . The SNS initially will consist of an accelerator system capable of delivering an {approximately}0.5 microsecond pulse of 1 GeV protons, at a 60 Hz frequency, with 1 MW of beam power, into a single target station. The SNS will eventually be upgraded to a 2 MW facility with two target stations (a 60 Hz station and a 10 Hz station). The radiation transport analysis, which includes the neutronic, shielding, activation, and safety analyses, is critical to the design of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed SNS, and the Monte Carlo method is the cornerstone of the radiation transport analyses.
Date: October 23, 2000
Creator: Johnson, J.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Target Station Development for the National Spallation Neutron Source

Description: The technologies that are being utilized to design and build a state-of-the-art neutron spallation source, the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS), are discussed. Emphasis is given to the technology issues that present the greatest scientific challenges. The present facility configuration, ongoing analysis and the planned hardware research and development program are also described.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Gabriel, TA
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Overview of the NSNS Target Station

Description: The technologies that are being utilized to design and build a state-of-the-art neutron spallation source, the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS), are discussed. Emphasis is given to the technology issues that present the greatest scientific challenges. The present facility configuration, ongoing analysis and the planned hardware research and development program are also described.
Date: August 2001
Creator: Gabriel, T. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Slow Neutron Leakage Spectra from Spallation Neutron Sources

Description: An efficient technique is described for Monte Carlo simulation of neutron beam spectra from target-moderator-reflector assemblies typical of pulsed spallation neutron sources. The technique involves the scoring of the transport-theoretical probability that a neutron will emerge from the moderator surface in the direction of interest, at each collision. An angle-biasing probability is also introduced which further enhances efficiency in simple problems.
Date: February 1980
Creator: Das, Shashikala G.; Carpenter, J. M. & Prael, R. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department