203 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Shielding Design of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

Description: The shielding design is important for the construction of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) due to its impact on conventional facility design, maintenance operations, and since the cost for the radiation shielding shares a considerable part of the total facility costs. A calculational strategy utilizing coupled high energy Monte Carlo calculations and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations, along with semi-empirical calculations, was implemented to perform the conceptual design shielding assessment of the proposed SNS. Biological shields have been designed and assessed for the proton beam transport system and associated beam dumps, the target station, and the target service cell and general remote maintenance cell. Shielding requirements have been assessed with respect to weight, space, and dose-rate constraints for operating, shutdown, and accident conditions. A discussion of the proposed facility design, conceptual design shielding requirements, calculational strategy, source terms, preliminary results and conclusions, and recommendations for additional analyses are presented.
Date: September 17, 1998
Creator: Johnson, J.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neutron scattering at the high flux isotope reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Description: Since its beginnings in Oak Ridge and Argonne in the late 1940`s, neutron scattering has been established as the premier tool to study matter in its various states. Since the thermal neutron wavelength is of the same order of magnitude as typical atomic spacings and because they have comparable energies to those of atomic excitations in solids, both structure and dynamics of matter can be studied via neutron scattering. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) provides an intense source of neutrons with which to carry out these measurements. This paper summarizes the available neutron scattering facilities at the HFIR.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Yethiraj, M. & Fernandez-Baca, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Injection into a circular machine with a KV distribution

Description: In order to achieve a maximum space charge limit in the IPNS-II synchrotron it is desirable to inject a Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) distribution (1). We rederive the KV distribution, first starting from a smoothed Hamiltonian and then for the full alternating gradient case. The microcanonical distribution can be generalized slightly so as to allow one to alter the aspect ratio of the beam ellipse. The KV distribution requires that the injected particles all have the same total transverse oscillation energy, and also that they are distributed uniformly throughout the entire energy shell. This requires painting the injected beam uniformly in the three independent dimensions of the energy shell. We have devised two scenarios for doing this, one involving a suitable variation of the x and y injected amplitudes during the injection process, and the second involving introducing a small coupling between the x and y motions. We have written a program to simulate the injection process which includes the turn-to-turn forces between the (500) injected turns. If we omit the turn-to-turn forces then the resulting space charge density distributions are indeed very nearly uniform within a circular beam cross section for either KV injection scenario, but are neither uniform nor circular for other plausible scenarios. With turn-to-turn forces included, the interturn scattering can be fairly important and the resulting density distributions tend to develop lower density halos. If we add a gradient bump to simulate magnetic quadrupole errors in the lattice, then the effects of half-integral resonances can be clearly seen. When the space charge forces between turns depress the tune to a resonance, beam growth keeps the tunes constant at the edge of the stop band, unless the resonance is crossed quickly.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Crosbie, E. & Symon, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Overview of the national spallation neutron source with emphasis on the target station

Description: The technologies that are being utilized to design and build a state-of-the-art neutron spallation source, the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS), are discussed. Emphasis is given to the technology issues that present the greatest scientific challenges. The present facility configuration, ongoing analysis and the planned hardware research and development program are also described.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Gabriel, T.A.; Barnes, J.N. & Charlton, L.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radiation effects in materials for accelerator-driven neutron technologies. Revision

Description: Accelerator-driven neutron technologies use spallation neutron sources (SNS`s) in which high-energy protons bombard a heavy-element target and spallation neutrons are produced. The materials exposed to the most damaging radiation environments in an SNS are those in the path of the incident proton beam. This includes target and window materials. These materials will experience damage from the incident protons and the spallation neutrons. In addition, some materials will be damaged by the spallation neutrons alone. The principal materials of interest for SNS`s are discussed elsewhere. The target should consist of one or more heavy elements, so as to increase the number of neutrons produced per incident proton. A liquid metal target (e.g., Pb, Bi, Pb-Bi, Pb-Mg, and Hg) has the advantage of eliminating the effects of radiation damage on the target material itself, but concerns over corrosion problems and the influence of transmutants remain. The major solid targets in operating SNS`s and under consideration for the 1-5 MW SNS`s are W, U, and Pb. Tungsten is the target material at LANSCE, and is the projected target material for an upgraded LANSCE target that is presently being designed. It is also the projected target material for the tritium producing SNS under design at LANL. In this paper, the authors present the results of spallation radiation damage calculations (displacement and He production) for tungsten.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Wechsler, M.S.; Lin, C. & Sommer, W.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Maintenance, operation, and research (radiation) zones (MORZ) application model - a design and operation tool for intelligent buildings with application to the advanced neutron source

Description: This paper describes a user-friendly application tool to assist in the design, operation and maintenance of large buildings/facilities charged with complex/extensive/elaborate activities. The model centers around a specially designed, easy-access data base containing essentially all the relevant information about the facility. Our first test case is the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) research reactor to be constructed as a center for neutron research.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Shapira, H.B. & Brown, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Operator role definition: An initial step in the human factors engineering design of the advanced neutron source (ANS)

Description: The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new basic and applied research facility sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy that is proposed for construction. It will provide neutron beams for measurements and experiments in the fields of materials science and engineering, biology, chemistry, materials analysis, and nuclear science. The facility will provide a useful neutron beam flux that is at least five times more than is available at the world`s best existing facilities. It will also provide world-class facilities for isotopes production, materials irradiation testing, materials analysis, and the production of positrons. ANS will be unique in the United States in the extent to which human factors engineering (HFE) principles will be included in its design and construction. Initial HFE accomplishments include the development of a functional analysis, an operating philosophy, and a program plan. In fiscal year 1994, HFE activities are focusing on the role of the ANS control room reactor operator (RO). An operator-centered control room model was used in conjunction with information gathered from existing ANS system design descriptions and other literature to define RO responsibilities. From this list, a survey instrument was developed and administered to ANS design engineers, operations management personnel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), and HFIR ROs to detail the nature of the RO position. Initial results indicated that the RO should function as a high-level system supervisor with considerable monitoring, verification, and communication responsibilities. The relatively high level of control automation has resulted in a reshaping of the RO`s traditional safety and investment protection roles.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Knee, H.E.; Spelt, P.F.; Houser, M.M. & Hill, W.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The advanced neutron source research and development plan

Description: The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world (an order of magnitude more intense than beams available from the most advanced existing reactors). The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of 330-MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of >7 {center_dot} 10{sup 19} {center_dot} m{sup -2} {center_dot} s{sup -1}. Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science as well as applied research leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The top level work breakdown structure (WBS) for the project. As noted in this figure, one component of the project is a research and development (R&D) program (WBS 1.1). This program interfaces with all of the other project level two WBS activities. Because one of the project guidelines is to meet minimum performance goals without relying on new inventions, this R&D activity is not intended to produce new concepts to allow the project to meet minimum performance goals. Instead, the R&D program will focus on the four objectives described.
Date: August 1, 1995
Creator: Selby, D.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proton injection and RF capture in the national spallation neutron source

Description: The accelerator system for the 1 to 5 MW National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) consists of a linac followed by a 1 GeV proton accumulator ring. Since the ring is a very high current machine, the injection and rf capture of the protons is deeply affected by transverse and longitudinal space charge effects. Results of numerical simulation of the process are presented together with considerations on methods and results of space charge treatment in high intensity proton storage rings.
Date: August 1997
Creator: Luccio, A. U.; Beebe-Wang, J. & Maletic, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Probing the {sup 196}Pt(n,xn{gamma}) reactions using GEANIE at LANSCE/WNR

Description: In this paper we will present the results from an experiment studying the {sup 196}Pt(n,xn) reactions for n < 14 at moderate to high angular momentum using the combination of the LANSCE/WNR spallation neutron source and the multi-Ge detector spectrometer, GEANIE.
Date: June 20, 1997
Creator: Bernstein, L.A.; Archer, D.E.; Becker, J.A.; Drake, D.; Garrett, P.E.; Johns, G.D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LANSCE personnel access control system

Description: The Radiation Security System (RSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) provides personnel protection from prompt radiation due to accelerated beam. The Personnel Access Control System (PACS) is a component of the RSS that is designed to prevent personnel access to areas where prompt radiation is a hazard. PACS was designed to replace several older personnel safety systems (PSS) with a single modem unified design. Lessons learned from the operation over the last 20 years were incorporated into a redundant sensor, single-point failure safe, fault tolerant, and tamper-resistant system that prevents access to the beam areas by controlling the access keys and beam stoppers. PACS uses a layered philosophy to the physical and electronic design. The most critical assemblies are battery backed up, relay logic circuits; less critical devices use Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) for timing functions and communications. Outside reviewers have reviewed the operational safety of the design. The design philosophy, lessons learned, hardware design, software design, operation, and limitations of the device are described.
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Sturrock, J.C.; Gallegos, F.R. & Hall, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Linac-driven spallation-neutron source

Description: Strong interest has arisen in accelerator-driven spallation-neutron sources that surpass existing facilities (such as ISIS at Rutherford or LANSCE at Los Alamos) by more than an order of magnitude in beam power delivered to the spallation target. The approach chosen by Los Alamos (as well as the European Spallation Source) provides the full beam energy by acceleration in a linac as opposed to primary acceleration in a synchrotron or other circular device. Two modes of neutron production are visualized for the source. A short-pulse mode produces 1 MW of beam power (at 60 pps) in pulses, of length less than 1 ms, by compression of the linac macropulse through multi-turn injection in an accumulator ring. A long-pulse mode produces a similar beam power with 1-ms-long pulses directly applied to a target. This latter mode rivals the performance of existing reactor facilities to very low neutron energies. Combination with the short-pulse mode addresses virtually all applications.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Jason, A.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spallation source neutron target systems

Description: This is the final report for a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project sought to design a next-generation spallation source neutron target system for the Manuel Lujan, Jr., Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) at Los Alamos. It has been recognized for some time that new advanced neutron sources are needed in the US if the country is to maintain a competitive position in several important scientific and technological areas. A recent DOE panel concluded that the proposed Advanced Neutron Source (a nuclear reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory) and a high-power pulsed spallation source are both needed in the near future. One of the most technically challenging designs for a spallation source is the target station itself and, more specifically, the target-moderator-reflector arrangement. Los Alamos has demonstrated capabilities in designing, building, and operating high-power spallation-neutron-source target stations. Most of the new design ideas proposed worldwide for target system design for the next generation pulsed spallation source have either been conceived and implemented at LANSCE or proposed by LANSCE target system designers. These concepts include split targets, flux-trap moderators, back scattering and composite moderators, and composite reflectors.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Russell, G.; Brown, R.; Collier, M. & Donahue, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary Assessment of the Nuclide Migration from the Activation Zone Around the Proposed Spallation Neutron Source Facility

Description: The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential impacts of migrating radionuclides from the activation zone around the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Using conservatively high estimates of the potential inventory of radioactive activation products that could form in the proposed compacted-soil shield berm around an SNS facility on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a conservative, simplified transport model was used to estimate the potential worst-case concentrations of the 12 long-lived isotopes in the groundwater under a site with the hydrologic characteristics of the ORR. Of the 12, only 3 isotopes showed any potential to exceed the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 20 Drinking Water Limits (DWLs). These isotopes were 14C, 22Na, and 54Mn. The latter two activation products have very short half-lives of 2.6 years and 0.854 year, respectively. Therefore, these will decay before reaching an off-site receptor, and they cannot pose off-site hazards. However, for this extremely conservative model, which overestimates the mobility of the contaminant, 14C, which has a 5,730-year half-life, was shown to represent a potential concern in the context of this study's conservative assumptions. This study examines alternative modifications to the SNS shield berm and makes recommendations.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Dole, L.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A low-frequency high-voltage rf-barrier-bunching system for high-intensity neutron source compressor rings

Description: A Los Alamos design for a 1-MW pulsed neutron source incorporates a ring utilizing an rf-barrier bunching system. This bunching concept allows uniform longitudinal beam distributions with low momentum spread. Bunching cavities are operated at the revolution frequency (1.5 MHz in this case) and each of the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th revolution frequency harmonics. Their effects combine to maintain a beam free gap in the longitudinal distribution of the accumulated beam. The cavities are driven by low-plate-resistance common-cathode configured retrode amplifiers incorporating local rf feedback. Additional adaptive feed-forward hardware is included to reduce the beam-induced bunching-gap voltages well below that achievable solely with rf feedback. Details of this system are presented along with a discussion of the various feed-back and feed-forward techniques incorporated.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Hardek, T.W.; Ziomek, C. & Rees, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A status report on the Advanced Neutron Source Project

Description: The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) will be a new laboratory for neutron research, centered around a 330 MW(f) research reactor cooled and reflected by heavy water and including extensive experiment systems and support facilities. The major components of the baseline design, occupying about 16 heetares, are a guide hall/research support area, containing most of the neutron beam experiment systems, shops and supporting laboratories; a 60 m diameter containment building housing the reactor and its primary coolant system, and selected scientific research facilities; an operations support building with the majority of the remaining plant systems; an office/interface complex providing a carefully designed, user friendly entry point for access control; and several other major facilities including user housing, an electrical substation, a diesel generator building, a cryorefrigerator building, and heavy water cleanup and upgrade systems.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: West, C. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Overview of the NSNS target station

Description: The technologies that are being utilized to design and build a state-of-the-art neutron spallation source, the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS), are discussed. Emphasis is given to the technology issues that present the greatest scientific challenges. The present facility configuration, ongoing analysis and the planned hardware research and development program are also described.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Gabriel, T.A.; Barnes, J.M. & Charlton, L. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The national spallation neutron source target station: A general overview

Description: The technologies that are being utilized to design and build a state-of-the-art neutron spallation source, the National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS), are discussed. Emphasis is given to the technology issues that present the greatest scientific challenges. The present facility configuration, ongoing analysis and the planned hardware research and development program are also described.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Gabriel, T.A.; Barnes, J.N. & Charlton, L.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rationale for a spallation neutron source target system test facility at the 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source

Description: The conceptual design study for a 1-MW Long-Pulse Spallation Source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center has shown the feasibility of including a spallation neutron test facility at a relatively low cost. This document presents a rationale for developing such a test bed. Currently, neutron scattering facilities operate at a maximum power of 0.2 MW. Proposed new designs call for power levels as high as 10 MW, and future transmutation activities may require as much as 200 MW. A test bed will allow assessment of target neutronics; thermal hydraulics; remote handling; mechanical structure; corrosion in aqueous, non-aqueous, liquid metal, and molten salt systems; thermal shock on systems and system components; and materials for target systems. Reliable data in these areas are crucial to the safe and reliable operation of new high-power facilities. These tests will provide data useful not only to spallation neutron sources proposed or under development, but also to other projects in accelerator-driven transmutation technologies such as the production of tritium.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Sommer, W.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use of the HPI Model 2080 pulsed neutron detector at the LANSCE complex - vulnerabilities and counting statistics

Description: The BPI Model 2080 Pulsed Neutron Detector has been used for over seven years as an area radiation monitor and dose limiter at the LANSCE accelerator complex. Operating experience and changing environments over this time have revealed several vulnerabilities (susceptibility to electrical noise, paralysis in high dose rate fields, etc.). Identified vulnerabilities have been connected; these modifications include component replacement and circuit design changes. The data and experiments leading to these modifications will be presented and discussed. Calibration of the instrument is performed in mixed static gamma and neutron source fields. The statistical characteristics of the Geiger-Muller tubes coupled with significantly different sensitivity to gamma and neutron doses require that careful attention be paid to acceptable fluctuations in dose rate over time during calibration. The performance of the instrument has been modeled using simple Poisson statistics and the operating characteristics of the Geiger-Muller tubes. The results are in excellent agreement with measurements. The analysis and comparison with experimental data will be presented.
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Jones, K.W. & Browman, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radioactive source recovery program responses to neutron source emergencies

Description: Recovery of neutron sources containing Pu{sup 239} and Be is currently taking place at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The program was initiated in 1979 by the Department of Energy (DOE) to dismantle and recover sources owned primarily by universities and the Department of Defense. Since the inception of this program, Los Alamos has dismantled and recovered more than 1000 sources. The dismantlement and recovery process involves the removal of source cladding and the chemical separation of the source materials to eliminate neutron emissions. While this program continues for the disposal of {sup 239}Pu/Be sources, there is currently no avenue for the disposition of any sources other than those containing Pu{sup 239}. Increasingly, there have been demands from agencies both inside and outside the Federal Government and from the public to dispose of unwanted sources containing {sup 238}Pu/Be and {sup 241}Am/Be. DOE is attempting to establish a formal program to recover these sources and is working closely with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on a proposed Memorandum of Understanding to formalize an Acceptance Program. In the absence of a formal program to handle {sup 238}Pu/Be and {sup 241}Am/Be neutron sources, Los Alamos has responded to several emergency requests to receive and recover sources that have been determined to be a threat to public health and safety. This presentation will: (1) review the established {sup 239}Pu neutron source recovery program at Los Alamos, (2) detail plans for a more extensive neutron source disposal program, and (3) focus on recent emergency responses.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Dinehart, S.M.; Hatler, V.A.; Gray, D.W. & Guillen, A.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Accumulator ring design for the NSNS project

Description: The goal of the proposed National Spallation Neutron Source (NSNS) is to provide a short pulse proton beam of about 0.5 {mu}s with average beam power of 1 MW. To achieve such purpose, a proton storage ring operated at 60 Hz with 1 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse at 1 GeV is required. The Accumulator Ring (AR) receives 1 msec long H{sup {minus}} beam bunches of 28 mA from a 1 GeV linac. Scope and design performance goals of the AR are presented, other possible technological choices and design options considered, but not adopted, are also briefly reviewed.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Weng, W.T.; Alessi, J. & Beebe-Wang, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department