237 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

CHARACTERISTICS OF A THERMIONIC CONVERTER WITH A HIGH-TEMPERATURE COLLECTOR

Description: Current-voltage characteristics of a cesium-on-tantalum thermionic converter with a collector temperature comparable to that of the emitter were obtained for a variety of electrode temperatures and cesium vapor pressures. The results show that for emitter temperatures in excess of 2000 deg K, power outputs of a few watts per square centimeter can be obtained when the ratio of collector temperature to emitter temperature is as high as 0.75 to 0.80, which is the required range for best performance of a radiation-cooled Carnot engine, and that at temperature ratios above 0.80 the power output is insensitive to changes in electrode spacing for ratios of spacing to electron mean free path greater than 100 at a cesium vapor pressure of 5 torr. (auth)
Date: January 15, 1963
Creator: Blue, E. & Ingold, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

INVESTIGATION OF CAVITATION DAMAGE OF MECHANICAL PUMP IMPELLERS OPERATING IN LIQUID METAL SPACE POWER LOOPS. Quarterly Progress Report No. 2, October 1, 1963-December 31, 1963

Description: Water testing of the RI-7C3 impeller in the Pt-2 test stand was completed. Still photographs and movies showed that a vortex was present on the leading edge tip of all blades at NPSH values up to 150 ft at all five test flows of 660, 680, 700, 720, and 740 gpm. Sound data showed a possible correlation with the cavitation performance of the impeller. The sound intensity increased until the tip vortices entered the flow channels and then decreased, reaching a minimum just before head loss occurred. As the head fell off, the sound intensity increased to a level as great or greater than the previous maximum. The TP-1 turbopump detail parts required to complete the assembly of the pump in its modified form were completed. The turbopump was assembled with the tested impeller and installed in the PT-4 water pump test stand. The pump was operated at low speed to assure proper seating of the seals and testing started. The PT-6 liquid metal test stand construction drawings were completed. Construction of the test stand was started by disassembling, cleaning, and acid pickling the entire loop piping. Reassembly of the test loop was started. (N.W.R.)
Date: January 15, 1964
Creator: Kulp, R.S. & Altieri, J.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SNAP 2/10A HYDRAULIC STUDIES

Description: A partial model of the reactor core was used, and demineralized water was circulated at flow rates determined by the Reynolds analogy to the prototype. Black plastic beads were introduced into the flow stream and photographed by using a Milliken camera recording at 500 frames per second. Calculations showed that 79% of the total mass flow was accounted for by this method. The 21% of the mass flow that was not accounted for was presumed to be due to flow in non- channel areas and in two non-orificed channels. Some error could also be attributed to the use of non-spherical beads that created non-uniform velocities in the channels, The visibility through the SNAP 2/10A core section, for the purpose of visual observation and optical recording, was very good. The high speed pictures were clear and sharp. The velocity determination based on the frame by frame analysis of the film did not present any problem. The experiment demonstrated that clear Lucite can be used as the material for visual flow observation in a full-scale SNAP 2/10A model core vessel. (auth)
Date: January 15, 1964
Creator: Thomasson, K.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THE SNAPKIN VI COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR SNAP REACTOR KINETICS CALCULATIONS

Description: S>The computer program SNAPWN VI is described which solves the space- independent reactor kinetics equations with feedback equations representing the principal shutdown mechanisms in a SNAP reactor. Reflector delay effects are treated by a reflector group model. By using an alternate main program and two alternate subroutines, spatially dependert feedback effects may be considered. Printed, CRT, and punchcard output may be obtained optionally. Sample problems are demonstrated for both versions of the code. The equations and listings are included. (auth)
Date: April 15, 1964
Creator: Rhoades, W.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT OF SALT VELOCITY TECHNIQUE

Description: The salt velocity technique for measuring coolant flow through a SNAP 8 tri-cusp channel was studied and developed. The parameters important in obtaining reproducible data were investigated and a test procedure, which yields dath of good precision, was developed. Dath were taken on a tri-cusp channel with flush circular electrodes (0.125 inch O.D.) as well as on a tri-cusp channel with parallel plate electrodes (0.006 inches thick, 0.250 inches long), which were situated 0.050 inches apart and protruded 0.040 inches into the stream. The data are presented as the ratio of U/sub exp//U/sub avg/ where U/sub avg/ is calculated by means of a flowrator and channel geometry. It was found that in the tri-cusp channel for a range of Reynolds Numbers of 11,000 to 25,000, a radial velocity profile could not be sensed. The peripheral velocity profile over the central baif of the cbannel appeared to be flat and relatively.independent of the Reynolds Number. The data were compared with similar work of Palmer and Swanson in a qualitative and quantitative manner. Reasons are given for using a single calibration factor in the hydraulic model testing of S8DS core. While some slight modifications should be made to further improve the accuracy of the salt velocity procedure, the most important phases of the development and perfection of the procedures were accomplished successfully. (auth)
Date: November 15, 1963
Creator: Daleas, R.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department