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Mixed-conducting ceramic membranes for partial oxygenation of methane

Description: The most significant cost associated with the conventional partial oxidation of methane is that of an oxygen plant. Our new technology offers a way to lower this cost, and in this paper we explore the technology that is based on dense ceramic membranes and that uses air as the oxidant for methane-conversion reactions. Mixed-conducting ceramic materials have been produced from mixed-oxide systems of the La-Sr-Fe-Co-O (SFC) type, in the form of tubes and bars. Thermodynamic stability of the tubes was studied as a function of oxygen partial pressure by high-temperature XRD. Mechanical properties were measured and found to be adequate for a reactor in the case of SFC-2: Electronic and ionic conductivities were measured; SFC-2 is unique in the sense that the ratio of ionic to electronic conductance is close to unity. Performance of the membrane tubes was good only with SFC-2. Fracture of other SFC tubes was the consequence of an oxygen gradient that introduced a volumetric lattice difference between the inner and outer walls. SFC-2 tubes provided methane conversion efficiencies of >99% in a reactor. These tubes have operated for >1000 h.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Maiya, P.S.; Mieville, R.L.; Kleefisch, M.S.; Udovich, C.A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Agent-based modeling of complex infrastructures

Description: Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) can be applied to investigate complex infrastructures and infrastructure interdependencies. The CAS model agents within the Spot Market Agent Research Tool (SMART) and Flexible Agent Simulation Toolkit (FAST) allow investigation of the electric power infrastructure, the natural gas infrastructure and their interdependencies.
Date: June 2001
Creator: North, M. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ceramic membranes for partial oxygenation of hydrocarbon fuels to high-value-added products

Description: This report describes the design of a membrane reactor for converting methane into value added products. The design includes an outer tube of perovskite which contacts air, an inner tube of zirconium oxide which contacts methane, and a bonding layer of a mixture of zirconium oxide and perovskite.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Balachandran, U.; Dusek, J.T.; Kleefisch, M.S. & Kobylinski, T.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Description: We estimated the effects on per-vehicle-mile fuel-cycle petroleum use, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and energy use of using ethanol blended with gasoline in a mid-size passenger car, compared with the effects of using gasoline in the same car. Our analysis includes petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with chemicals manufacturing, farming of corn and biomass, ethanol production, and ethanol combustion for ethanol; and petroleum use, energy use, and emissions associated with petroleum recovery, petroleum refining, and gasoline combustion for gasoline. For corn-based ethanol, the key factors in determining energy and emissions impacts include energy and chemical usage intensity of corn farming, energy intensity of the ethanol plant, and the method used to estimate energy and emissions credits for co-products of corn ethanol. The key factors in determining the impacts of cellulosic ethanol are energy and chemical usage intensity of biomass farming, ethanol yield per dry ton of biomass, and electricity credits in cellulosic ethanol plants. The results of our fuel-cycle analysis for fuel ethanol are listed below. Note that, in the first half of this summary, the reductions cited are per-vehicle-mile traveled using the specified ethanol/gasoline blend instead of conventional (not reformulated) gasoline. The second half of the summary presents estimated changes per gallon of ethanol used in ethanol blends. GHG emissions are global warming potential (GWP)-weighted, carbon dioxide (CO2)-equivalent emissions of CO2, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O).
Date: February 8, 1999
Creator: Saricks, C.; Santini, D. & Wang, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Synthetic drilling fluids - a pollution prevention opportunity for the oil and gas industry

Description: Offshore oil and gas operators use specialized drilling fluids, referred to as {open_quotes}muds,{close_quotes} to help maintain well control and to remove drill cuttings from the hole. Historically, either water-based muds (WBMs) or oil-based muds (OBMs) have been used for offshore wells. Recently, the drilling industry has developed several types of synthetic-based muds (SBMs) that combine the desirable operating qualities of OBMs with the lower toxicity and environmental impact qualities of WBMs. This report describes the operational, environmental, and economic features of all three types of muds and discusses potential EPA regulatory barriers to wider use of SBMs.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Veil, J.A.; Burke, C.J. & Moses, D.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Increased emphasis on toxics control in oil and gas industry NPDES permits

Description: The 1987 amendments to the Clean Water Act emphasized stricter control of toxics in wastewater discharges. Although state and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency permit writers have had the authority to incorporate strict water quality-based controls in permits, they did not widely use this authority in the past. However, general permits proposed in the past year by Region VI for discharges into the territorial seas of Louisiana and by Region X for coastal and offshore discharges in Alaska are much stricter than their predecessors. The Region VI permit requires numerical produced water limits on arsenic, lead, benzene, total phenols, radium, and whole effluent toxicity. The Region X permit requires numerical produced water limits on copper, arsenic, zinc, total aromatic hydrocarbons, total aqueous hydrocarbons, and whole effluent toxicity. The additional requirements increase the cost of complying with the permit, present more opportunities for exceeding one of the permit limits, and serve as a precedent for future permits. The industry should be prepared to accept the additional costs of these requirements or develop data to convince the regulatory agencies that the increased level of monitoring and permit limits is not necessary to protect water quality. Regulatory agencies should be receptive to new data provided by the industry and flexible in setting additional toxics controls.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Veil, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

Description: Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.
Date: July 29, 2005
Creator: Nuttall, Brandon C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of high-efficiency gas-liquid contactors for natural gas processing. Semi-annual report, April--September 1994

Description: Objective was to ensure reliable supply of high-quality natural gas by reducing the cost of treating subquality natural gas containing H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S and/or trace quantities of other gaseous impurities by applying high-efficiency rotating and structured packing gas liquid contactors. The work included analysis of base case residence time, viscosity studies on low pressure rotary contactor system, and surface tension studies on the contactor.
Date: November 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fossil fuel conversion -- Measurement and modeling

Description: The main objective of this program is to understand the chemical and physical mechanisms in coal conversion processes and incorporate this knowledge in computer-aided reactor engineering technology for the purposes of development, evaluation, design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. To accomplish this objective, this program will: (1) provide critical data on the physical and chemical processes in fossil fuel gasifier and combustors; (2) further develop a set of comprehensive codes; and (3) apply these codes to model various types of combustors and gasifier (fixed-bed, transport reactor, and fluidized-bed for coal and gas turbines for natural gas). Results are presented on the devolatilization of large coal particles; transport reactor modeling; fluidized bed model; nitrogen evolution from small and large coal particles; modeling of hydrogen cyanide and ammonia release during coal pyrolysis; oxidation rates for large coal particles at high pressures; advanced fixed-bed model development and evaluation; application of ACERC combustion and gasification codes to AFR diagnostic capabilities to systems of interest to METC; and submodel for lean premixed combustion of natural gas in industrial gas turbines.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Solomon, P.R.; Smoot, L.D.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Brewster, B.S. & Radulovic, P.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF): Recent advances

Description: The objectives of this project are: (1)Investigate fluid rheological behavior, dynamic fluid leak-off behavior, and proppant transport characteristics of various fracturing fluids used for stimulating oil and gas bearing formations. (2) Develop new information for characterizing the behavior of fracturing fluids under conditions more representative of the behavior in actual fractures. (3) Continue utilizing the advanced capabilities of the high pressure simulator (HPS) to perform near-term research and development activities and not to construct a large-scale simulator that was proposed originally. This paper describes equipment enhancements, data acquisition and instrumentation upgrades, R&D test results, and future research planned for the Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Shah, S.N. & Fagan, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A structural analysis of natural gas consumption by income class from 1987 to 1993

Description: This study had two major objectives: (1) assess and compare changes in natural gas consumption between 1987 and 1993 by income group and (2) assess the potential influence of energy policy on observed changes in natural gas consumption over time and across income groups. This analysis used U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) data files and involved both the generation of simple descriptive statistics and the use of multivariate regression analysis. The consumption of natural gas by the groups was studied over a six-year period. The results showed that: (1) natural gas use was substantially higher for the highest income group than for the two lower income groups and (2) natural gas consumption declined for the lowest and middle income quintiles and increased for the highest income quintile between 1987 and 1990; between 1990 and 1993, consumption increased for the lowest and middle income quintile, but remained relatively constant for the highest income quintile. The relative importance of the structural and variable factors in explaining consumption changes between survey periods varies by income group. The analysis provides two major energy policy implications: (1) natural gas intensity has been the highest for the lowest income group, indicating that this group is more vulnerable to sudden changes in demand-indicator variables, in particular weather-related variables, than increase natural gas consumption, and (2) the fall in natural gas intensity between 1987 and 1993 may indicate that energy policy has had some impact on reducing natural gas consumption. 11 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Poyer, D.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New Technology for America`s Electric Power Industry. Emissions reduction in gas turbines

Description: Argonne National Laboratory is examining alternatives to straight natural gas firing. Research has shown that the addition of certain catalytic agents, such as in hydrogen co-firing, shows promise. When hydrogen co-firing is used in tandem with steam injection, a decrease in both CO and NO{sub x} emissions has been observed. In-process hydrogen production and premixing with the natural gas fuel are also being explored.
Date: April 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oil field waste disposal costs at commercial disposal facilities

Description: The exploration and production segment of the U.S. oil and gas industry generates millions of barrels of nonhazardous oil field wastes annually. In most cases, operators can dispose of their oil fields wastes at a lower cost on-site than off site and, thus, will choose on-site disposal. However, a significant quantity of oil field wastes are still sent to off-site commercial facilities for disposal. This paper provides information on the availability of commercial disposal companies in different states, the treatment and disposal methods they employ, and how much they charge. There appear to be two major off-site disposal trends. Numerous commercial disposal companies that handle oil field wastes exclusively are located in nine oil-and gas-producing states. They use the same disposal methods as those used for on-site disposal. In addition, the Railroad Commission of Texas has issued permits to allow several salt caverns to be used for disposal of oil field wastes. Twenty-two other oil- and gas-producing states contain few or no disposal companies dedicated to oil and gas industry waste. The only off-site commercial disposal companies available handle general industrial wastes or are sanitary landfills. In those states, operators needing to dispose of oil field wastes off-site must send them to a local landfill or out of state. The cost of off-site commercial disposal varies substantially, depending on the disposal method used, the state in which the disposal company is located, and the degree of competition in the area.
Date: October 1, 1997
Creator: Veil, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Greenhouse gas emission impacts of alternative-fueled vehicles: Near-term vs. long-term technology options

Description: Alternative-fueled vehicle technologies have been promoted and used for reducing petroleum use, urban air pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, greenhouse gas emission impacts of near-term and long-term light-duty alternative-fueled vehicle technologies are evaluated. Near-term technologies, available now, include vehicles fueled with M85 (85% methanol and 15% gasoline by volume), E85 (85% ethanol that is produced from corn and 15% gasoline by volume), compressed natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. Long-term technologies, assumed to be available around the year 2010, include battery-powered electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, vehicles fueled with E85 (ethanol produced from biomass), and fuel-cell vehicles fueled with hydrogen or methanol. The near-term technologies are found to have small to moderate effects on vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. On the other hand, the long-term technologies, especially those using renewable energy (such as biomass and solar energy), have great potential for reducing vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. In order to realize this greenhouse gas emission reduction potential, R and D efforts must continue on the long-term technology options so that they can compete successfully with conventional vehicle technology.
Date: May 20, 1997
Creator: Wang, M.Q.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The IMPACTT model: Structure and technical description

Description: The Integrated Market Penetration and Anticipated Cost of Transportation Technologies model, or IMPACTT, is a spreadsheet model that calculates the effect of advanced-technology vehicles and market penetration on baseline fuel use and emissions. Outputs include estimates of the quantity and value of oil displaced and emissions reduced by advanced-technology vehicles, the quantity of alternative fuels they consume, and the total incremental costs bome by purchasers of advanced-technology vehicles. In the current version of IMPACTT, up to eight fuel or engine technologies applicable to light-duty vehicles can be modeled by using a three-phase approach. First, the vehicle stock and miles traveled by the advanced-technology vehicle are determined. Second, assumptions about efficiency and fuel shares are used to estimate substitution-fuel use and oil displacement. Third, changes in emissions of carbon monoxide, non-methane hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide are computed.
Date: December 1, 1994
Creator: Mintz, M.M.; Tompkins, M.M. & Camp, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments and heterogeneity. Progress report, January 1--March 31, 1996

Description: The major project objective is to help move small American businesses (oil and gas independent operators) from traditional practices in oil and gas reservoir management to an unproved integrated team approach making better use of information and the expertise of people. This objective is being accomplished in two ways: (1) Specific examples resulting from our field study, and (2) A general manual documenting the process of integrating data and people from the disciplines of geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering. An actual oil field in the Denver Julesburg Basin in Colorado was selected to test the methods of integration. Efforts during this quarter were dedicated to history matching of the simulation model and to planning for various forecast runs. The geologic model and the engineering analysis resulted in a reservoir simulation model that is representative of the main features of the reservoir, such as the compartments and differing gas-oil contacts in each compartment. As a result of the history matching process, changes were made in the model. The economic significance of these changes, if any, will be addressed in the final report.
Date: April 30, 1996
Creator: Van Kirk, C.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments. Annual technical report

Description: This DOE research project was established to document the integrated team approach for solving reservoir engineering problems. The goal will be to provide tools and approaches that can be used to detect reservoir compartments, reach a better reserve estimate, and improve profits early in the life of a field. Field selection consumed nearly the first four months of the project. The choice was the Hambert Field area which is the field area being studied. During the remainder of the year, a significant portion of the data was gathered and entered into a data base. Cores have been described, log analysis performed on over 100 wells, and regional mapping and correlation of sedimentary packages completed. Compressional (P) and shear (S) wave velocity data was measured on 8 core plugs at various conditions and lithologies. The analysis of the 3D seismic data has been started and supports the interpretation that the structural component will be a significant factor for reservoir compartmentalization in this reservoir. The experimental permeability work completed includes the pressure decay profile permeability measurements on the cores. Relationships of porosity and permeability with net confining stress were developed. Core relative permeability measurements were also completed during the year. Additional experimental measurements completed include Young`s Modulus, Shear Modulus, Poisson`s ratio, and the bulk compressibility as a function of the effective stress. Preliminary engineering analysis of the pressure build-up data from two wells supports the conclusion that sealing faults may act as barriers to flow.
Date: October 28, 1994
Creator: Van Kirk, C.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments. Quarterly technical progress report, [April 1995--June 1995]

Description: This United States Department of Energy (DOE) research project was established to document the integrated team approach for solving reservoir engineering problems. A field study integrating the disciplines of geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering will be the mechanism for documenting the integrated approach. This is an area of keen interest to the oil and gas industry. The goal will be to provide tools and approaches that can be used to detect reservoir compartments, reach a better reserve estimate, and improve profits early in the life of a field. Brief summaries are presented for reservoir characterization; documentation of the BVW-BVZ pay discrimination technique; reservoir simulation; and outcrop analog.
Date: July 21, 1995
Creator: Van Kirk, C.W. & Thompson, R.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

Description: This DOE research project was established to document the integrated team approach for solving reservoir engineering problems. A field study integrating the disciplines of geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering will be the mechanism for documenting the integrated approach. This is an area of keen interest to the oil and gas industry. The goal will be to provide tools and approaches that can be used to detect reservoir compartments, reach a better reserve estimate, and improve profits early in the life of a field. Brief summaries are provided for the following six tasks: reservoir selection and data gathering; outcrop/core/log analysis/and correlations; internal architecture description; seismic analysis; detailed reservoir engineering evaluation; and permeability experimental work. Where appropriate reports by the research professors and the research assistants are included in the appendix.
Date: January 27, 1995
Creator: Van Kirk, C.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Natural gas monthly, July 1995

Description: The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Explanatory Notes supplement the information found in tables of the report. A description of the data collection surveys that support the NGM is provided in the Data Sources section. A glossary of the terms used in this report is also provided to assist readers in understanding the data presented in this publication. All natural gas volumes are reported at a pressure base of 14.73 pounds per square inch absolute (psia) and at 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Cubic feet are converted to cubic meters by applying a factor of 0.02831685.
Date: July 21, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Natural gas monthly, June 1995

Description: The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month feature is on the value of underground storage in today`s natural gas industry.
Date: June 21, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, July--September 1994

Description: This report details the field work undertaken by Coleman Energy and Environmental Systems--Blackhawk Geosciences Division (CEES-BGD) and Lynn, Inc. during the summer of 1994 at a gas field in the Wind River Basin in central Wyoming. The field work described herein consisted of two parts: multicomponent feasibility studies during the 3D P-wave survey on the site, and 9C VSP in a well at the site. The objectives of both surveys were to characterize the nature of anisotropy in the reservoir. With the 9C VSP, established practices were used to achieve this objective in the immediate vicinity of the well. With the multicomponent studies, tests were conducted to establish the feasibility of surface recording of the anisotropic reservoir rocks.
Date: November 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM): Technology share component

Description: The models described in this report are used to allocate total energy consumption in an energy end-use service area by fuel type (including electricity) within the Distributive Impact Assessment Model (DIAM) framework. The primary objective of the DIAM is to provide energy consumption and expenditure forecasts for different population categories that are consistent with the US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration`s (EIA`s) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) forecast, which is produced annually in the Annual Energy Outlook and periodically in support of DOE policy formulation and analysis. The models are multinominal logit models that have been estimated using EIA`s 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Three models were estimated: space heating share, water heating share, and cooking share. These models are used to allocate total end-use service consumption over different technologies defined by fuel type characteristics. For each of the end-use service categories, consumption shares are estimated for a subset of six fuel types: natural gas, electricity, liquid petroleum gas, fuel oil/kerosene, wood, and other fuel.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Poyer, D.A.; Earl, E. & Bonner, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department