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Properties of Geopressured Brines and Wells in the Gulf Coast and Opportunities for Industrial/Research Participation

Description: Geopressured reservoirs exhibit pressure gradients in excess of the normal hydrostatic gradient. In the Gulf Coast area the normal gradient is 0.465 psi/ft. Pressures may approach lithostatic pressure and have been measured as high as 1.05 psi/ft in the Gulf Coast area. Geopressured basins exist worldwide and in a number of U.S. locations, east, west, north and south. The Gulf Coast area has been studied extensively and is the subject of the DOE geopressured-geothermal research at present. The assumed ranges in resource characteristics include: depth from -12,000 to > -20,000 feet, brine flow rate from 20,000 to 40,000 bpd, temperature from 300 to 400 F, bottomhole pressure from 12,000 to 18,500 psi; salinity from 20,000 to 200,000 mg/L, gas-water ratio from 40 to 80 scf/bbl., and condensate from a trace to production. Energy in the geopressured resource includes gas, thermal, and hydraulic energy. It has been estimated that there are 6,000 quads of methane and 11,000 quads of thermal energy in the Gulf Coast area geopressured-geothermal reservoirs. Estimates run as high as 50,000 quad for the thermal energy (Wallace et al, 1978). Present industrial interest in the Pleasant Bayou and Hulin wells includes: desalination plants, an economic study by a power company for regional use, use of generated electricity by a coalition of towns, aquaculture (catfish farming) research program, and an unsolicited proposal for enhanced oil recovery of heavy oil. Direct uses of the hot brine cover dozens of industries and processes. An example of multiple uses in the USSR is shown. Outside agency interest includes the U.S.G.S., N.S.F., G.R.I., and possibly other areas within DOE. A research spin-off: a sensitive in-line benzene monitor has been designed by USL and will be tested in the near future. An in-line pH monitor is also under development for the harsh conditions of ...
Date: March 21, 1989
Creator: Wys, J. Nequs- de
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Petrography, Mineralogy, and Reservoir Characteristics of the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in the East-Central Piceance Basin, Colorado

Description: From abstract: Three closely spaced wells drilled through the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and were extensively cored and logged in order to identify the factors controlling the occurrence and distribution of gas in low-permeability rocks and to improve recovery technology.
Date: 1989
Creator: Pitman, Janet K.; Pollastro, Richard M. & Spencer, Charles Winthrop
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery Using Geopressured-Geothermal Brine

Description: This white paper presents a unique plan for an Oil Industry-DOE cost sharing research project for Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery (TEOR) of medium and heavy oil using geopressured-geothermal brine. This technology would provide an environmentally clean method of recovery as opposed to the burning of crude oil or natural gas used widely by the industry, but presently under scrutiny by federal and state air quality agencies, as well as provide an alternative to the very expensive operational and mechanical problems associated with heating water on the surface for injection. An example test reservoir is a shallow, small structural reservoir about 1-l/2 miles long by 1/2 mile wide. It is presently producing heavy oil (18.6 API gravity) from 5 wells, and is marginally economic. One of three nearby geopressured-geothermal wells could be re-entered and recompleted to supply about 400 F brine from 13-16,000 feet. This brine can be used to heat and drive the heavy oil. It is anticipated that about one million barrels of oil may be recovered by this project. Over 3 million barrels are estimated to be in place; only 2.7% of the oil in place has been produced. The suggested teaming arrangement includes: (1) EG&G Idaho, Inc., which presently provides technical and management support to DOE in the Gulf EG&G would supply coordination, management and Coast Geopressured-Geothermal Program. technical support to DOE for the Thermal Enhanced Oil Recovery Project. (2) A small business which would supply the field, geologic and well data, production wells, and production operation. They would cost-share the project and provide revenue from increased production (5% of increased production) to help offset DOE costs. Though DOE would cost-share brine supply and injection system, they would not assume well ownership. The small business would supply engineering and operations for brine supply, injection system, and collection ...
Date: December 1, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program: An Overview

Description: The geopressured-geothermal resource consists of deeply buried reservoirs of hot brine, under abnormally high pressures, that contain dissolved methane. Geopressured brine reservoirs with pressures approaching the lithostatic load are known to occur both onshore and offshore beneath the Gulf of Mexico coast, along the Pacific west coast, in Appalachia, as well as in deep sedimentary basins elsewhere in the United States. The Department of Energy (DOE) has concentrated its research on the northern Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin (Figure 1) which consists largely of Tertiary interbedded sandstones and shales deposited in alternating deltaic, fluvial, and marine environments. Thorsen (1964) and Norwood and Holland (1974) describe three generalized depositional facies in sedimentary beds of the Gulf Coast Geosyncline (Figure 2 ): (1) a massive sandstone facies in which sandstone constitutes 50 percent o r more of the sedimentary volume; (2) an alternating sandstone and shale facies in which sandstone constitutes 15 to 35 percent of the sedimentary volume. (3) a massive shale facies in which sandstone constitutes 15 percent or less of the sedimentary volume. In general, at any given location the volume of sandstone decreases with increasing depth. The datum of higher-than-normal fluid pressures is associated with the alternating sandstone and shale facies and the massive shale facies. Faulting and salt tectonics have complicated the depositional patterns and influenced the distribution of geopressured reservoirs (Wallace et a1 1978). The sandstones in the alternating sandstone and shale facies have the greatest potential for geopressured-geothermal energy development. Due to the insulating effect of surrounding shales, temperatures of the geopressured-geothermal brines typically range from 250 F to over 350 F, and under prevailing temperature, pressure, and salinity conditions, the brine contains 20 or more cubic feet of methane per barrel. Wallace et al (1978) estimated the geopressured-geothermal energy in Gulf Coast sandstone pore ...
Date: April 1, 1989
Creator: Fortuna, Raymond & Jelacic, Allan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Evolution of Sedimentary Basins--Uinta and Piceance Basins: Chapters H and I]

Description: From abstract: Analysis of vitrinite reflectance profiles and surfaces of equal vitrinite reflectance in the southeastern part of the Piceance basin, northwestern Colorado, indicates that burial histories for the Divide Creek anticline and the Grand Hogback are different from those for adjacent synclines. These two positive structures probably reached their present-day thermal maturity before late Eocene folding and before the end of the Laramide orogeny. In contrast, adjacent synclines did not reach their present-day thermal maturity until the end of the Laramide orogeny, or possibly later.
Date: 1989
Creator: Nuccio, Vito F.; Johnson, Ronald Carl & Johnson, Samuel Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geologic History and Hydrocarbon Potential of Late Cretaceous-Age, Low-Permeability Reservoirs, Piceance Basin, Western Colorado

Description: From abstract: The Piceance basin of western Colorado contains large reserves of natural gas in low-permeability reservoirs of the Late Cretaceous-age Mesaverde Formation or Mesaverde Group. The gas accumulation can be divided into three general zones: a zone of surface-water invasion that extends inward a few miles from present outcrops, a gas-and-waterbearing zone that extends 10-20 miles inward from the water-bearing zone, and a central, predominantly gasbearing zone.
Date: 1989
Creator: Johnson, Ronald Carl
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report

Description: The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for data frac'' stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.
Date: February 1, 1989
Creator: Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P. & Locke, C.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 8, July 16--September 30, 1988

Description: The goal of this research is to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that later can be converted to either liquid fuels or value-added chemicals, as economics dictate. During this reporting period, we investigated the behavior of some of our catalysts under working conditions using diffuse reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT). Two catalysts (FeRu{sub 3} and Ru{sub 4} on magnesia) were examined under nitrogen, and the Ru{sub 4}/MgO system was examined under a methane/argon mixture. We synthesized ruthenium clusters supported on carbon as catalysts for methane reforming and new phthalocyanines to be used as catalyst precursors for oxidizing methane to methanol. The Ru{sub 4} and FeRu{sub 3} complexes supported on magnesia exhibited very different behavior in the DRIFT cell when heated under nitrogen. The FeRu{sub 3}/MgO system was completely decarbonylated by 400{degrees}C, while spectrum of the Ru{sub 4} system displayed carbonyl peaks until the temperature rose to over 600{degrees}C. The ru{sub 4}/MgO system behaved almost identically under methane/argon as it did under nitrogen in the carbonyl region. In the C-H region of the spectrum (2800-3100 cm{sup {minus}1}), peaks were observed under methane but not under nitrogen. The intensity of these peaks did not vary with temperature. We synthesized new catalysts by supporting the Ru{sub 4} and Ru{sub 6} clusters on carbon. Both acidic zeolites (Type Y or 5A) and basic magnesia (MgO) have been observed to react with hydrocarbons at high temperatures; these reactions generally lead to coking, then deactivation of the catalyst contained on these supports. We expect carbon to be a truly inert support.
Date: March 1, 1989
Creator: Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Posin, B.M. & Chan, Yee Wai
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 9, October 1--December 31, 1988

Description: The goal of this research is to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that later can be converted to either liquid fuels or value-added chemicals, as economics dictate. During this reporting period, we completed our IR spectroscopic examination of the Ru{sub 4}/MgO and FeRu{sub 3}/MgO systems under nitrogen and methane by examining FeRu{sub 3}/MgO under methane. This system behaved quite differently than the same system under nitrogen. Under methane, only one very broad peak is observed at room temperature. Upon heating, the catalyst transformed so that by 300{degrees}C, the spectrum of FeRu{sub 3}/MgO under methane was the same as that of Ru{sub 4}/MgO. This suggests that methane promotes the segregation of the metals in the mixed metal system. The differences in catalytic activity between the FeRu{sub 3}/MgO and Ru{sub 4}/MgO systems may then be due to the presence of IR transparent species such as iron ions which cause different nucleation in the ruthenium clusters. We examined several systems for activity in the methane dehydrogenation reaction. Focusing on systems which produce C{sub 6} hydrocarbons since this is the most useful product. These systems all displayed low activity so that the amount of hydrocarbon product is very low. Some C{sub 6} hydrocarbon is observed over zeolite supports, but its production ceases after the first few hours of reaction. We prepared a new system, Ru{sub 4} supported on carbon, and examined its reactivity. Its activity was very low and in fact the carbon support had the same level of activity. We synthesized four new systems for examination as catalysts in the partial oxidation of methane. Three of these (PtTSPC/MgO, PtTSPC and PdTSPC on carbon) are analogs of PdTSPC/MgO. This system is of interest because we have observed the production of ethane from methane oxidation over PdTSPC/MgO at relatively ...
Date: March 10, 1989
Creator: Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Posin, B.M. & Chan, Yee Wai
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 10, January 1--March 31, 1989

Description: The goal of this research is to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that later can be converted to either liquid fuels or value-added chemicals, as economics dictate. In this reporting period, we have utilized samples of magnesia differing in their pretreatment temperature. Both the hydrido-ruthenium complex H{sub 4}Ru{sub 4}(CO){sub 12} and its reaction product with triethyl aluminum were reacted with these samples. The two ruthenium clusters are expected to react with the magnesia surface in different ways: by deprotonation of the hydride through an acid-base reaction with the basic surface, or by hydrolysis of the aluminum-carbon bond of the triethyl aluminum adduct. The concentration of hydroxyl groups on the magnesia surface able to hydrolyze the aluminum-carbon bond for immobilation should vary depending on the temperature of the pretreatment; the concentration of basic sites which can deprotonate the cluster should also vary with temperature. These differences were borne out by the experiment. We also compared the activity of two batches of AlRu{sub 4}/MgO which had been synthesized at different times in the project. Both batches had approximately the same activity, but the newer batch had greater selectivity for C{sub 6+} hydrocarbons.
Date: May 19, 1989
Creator: Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Posin, B.M. & Chan, Yee Wai
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Yttria-stabilized zirconia solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells, monolithic solid oxide fuel cells

Description: Small cell size, thin ceramic components, and high operating temperature are the key features of the MSOFC. The small size of individual cells in the monolithic structure increases the active surface area. For example, an MSOFC with channels about 1 mm in diameter has a ratio of active surface area to volume of about 9.4 sq cm/cu cm. This is about seven times the ratio for conventional fuel cells. On this basis alone, an MSOFC with a channel diameter of 1 mm should produce the same power as a conventional fuel cell seven times as large. The high current density of the MSOFC results from the small cell size and ensuing low internal resistance. The current density is high at the fuel inlet end of the fuel channel where the thermodynamic driving force (Nernst potential) is highest. Similarly, the current density is low at the outlet end of the fuel channel where the Nernst potential is lowest. Because of the high operating temperature of the MSOFC (1000{degrees}C),hydrocarbon fuels can be reformed in the fuel channels. The reform reaction produces hydrogen which is consumed by the fuel cell. Catalytic reforming of methane and natural gas within a solid oxide fuel cell has been demonstrated.
Date: January 1, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection

Description: The objective of this project is to evaluate and demonstrate a cost effective emission control technology for acid rain precursors, oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and sulfur (SO{sub x}), on three coal fired utility boilers in Illinois. The units selected are representative of pre-NSPS design practices: tangential, wall, and cyclone fired. The specific objectives are to demonstrate reductions of 60 percent in NO{sub x} and 50 percent in SO{sub x} emissions, by a combination of two developed technologies, gas reburning (GR) and sorbent injection (SI). With GR, about 80--85 percent of the coal fuel is fired in the primary combustion zone. The balance of the fuel is added downstream as natural gas to create a slightly fuel rich environment in which NO{sub x} is converted to N{sub 2}. The combustion process is completed by overfire air addition. SO{sub x} emissions are reduced by injecting dry sorbents (usually calcium based) into the upper furnace. The sorbents trap SO{sub x} as solid sulfates that are collected in the particulate control device.
Date: September 27, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Weeks Island gravity stable CO2 pilot: Final report

Description: The Weeks Island ''S'' sand Reservoir B (''S'' RB) gravity-stable CO2 field test was completed during February 1988. Injection started in October 1978 and production began in January 1981 in this high-permeability, steeply-dipping sandstone reservoir. About 264,000 barrels of oil or 65 percent of the starting volume has been recovered. A 24-percent pore-volume slug of CO2 mixed with about six mole percent of natural gas (mostly methane) was injected at the start of the pilot. Since 1983, produced CO2 plus hydrocarbon gases have been recycled. CO2 usage statistics are 9.34 MCF/BO with recycle and 3.24 MCF/BO based on purchased CO2. Previous annual reports document the pilot design, implementation, and early results for the 1977 to June 1981 time period. This report is a review of early pilot history and a more detailed account of the post June 1981 results and overall interpretation. A reservoir-simulation history match of pilot performance plus core and log data from a 1983 swept-zone evaluation well are described in this report. A brief description of the production facility and an account of the corrosion control program are also included. 11 refs., 34 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Johnston, J.R. & Perry, G.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of U. S. energy resources and reserves

Description: This report provides a comprehensive overview of the best available estimates of the total domestic energy potential within the United States. The array of energy sources include those appropriate for power generation, liquid fuels, and direct heat applications. The energy sources examined are: geothermal energy, solar energy, biomass energy, wind energy, shale oil, coal, petroleum, natural gas, peat, uranium, and hydropower. 37 refs., 7 figs., 59 tabs.
Date: December 1, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Core analysis in a low permeability sandstone reservoir: Results from the Multiwell Experiment

Description: Over 4100 ft (1100 ft oriented) of Mesaverde core was taken during the drilling of the three Multiwell Experiment (MWX) wells, for study in a comprehensive core analysis program. This core traversed five separate depositional environments (shoreline/marine, coastal, paludal, fluvial, and paralic), and almost every major sand in the Mesaverde at the site was sampled. This paper summarizes MWX core analysis and describes the petrophysical properties at the MWX site; reservoir parameters, including permeabilities of naturally fractured core; and mechanical rock properties including stress-related measurements. Some correlations are made between reservoir properties and mineralogy/petrology data. Comparisons are made between the properties of lenticular and blanket sandstone morphologies existing at the site. This paper provides an overview of a complete core analysis in a low-permeability sandstone reservoir. 66 refs., 17 figs. , 9 tabs.
Date: April 1, 1989
Creator: Sattler, A.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An investigation to define the physical/chemical constraints which limit NO sub x emission reduction achievable by reburning

Description: Reburning is a combustion modification technique which removes NO{sub x} from combustion products by using fuel as a reducing agent. Previous studies have shown that natural gas is more effective than coal as a reburning fuel. Objectives of this program are to define the chemical and physical constraints which prevent the attainment of 80% NO{sub x} reduction with reburning and to test improved configurations for reburning as an advanced NO{sub x} control technique for coal-fired boilers. Bench scale studies are designed to screen the chemical and physical means for enhancing reburning efficiency. Pilot studies will evaluate the impacts of finite rate mixing on the effectiveness of the various concepts. The program consists of the following: (1) bench scale studies on N{sub 2} formation in reburning zone and XN conversion in burnout zone; (2) pilot scale studies; (3) interpretation and generalization; and a final report. This quarterly report documents the bench scale experimental results on the enhancement of reburning with distributed fuel addition and advanced hybrid process. The experiments were conducted in the bench scale Control Temperature Tower (CTT). 7 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Chen, S. L.; Ho, L. & Pershing, D. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

North American Natural Gas Markets: Selected technical studies

Description: The Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) was established in 1976 at Stanford University to provide a structural framework within which energy experts, analysts, and policymakers could meet to improve their understanding of critical energy problems. The ninth EMF study, North American Natural Gas Markets, was conducted by a working group comprised of leading natural gas analysts and decision-makers from government, private companies, universities, and research and consulting organizations. The EMF 9 working group met five times from October 1986 through June 1988 to discuss key issues and analyze natural gas markets. This third volume includes technical papers that support many of the conclusions discussed in the EMF 9 summary report (Volume 1) and full working group report (Volume 2). These papers discuss the results from the individual models as well as some nonmodeling analysis related to US natural gas imports and industrial natural gas demand. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.
Date: April 1, 1989
Creator: Huntington, H.G. & Schuler, G.E. (eds.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An investigation to define the physical/chemical constraints which limit NO sub x emission reduction achievable by reburning

Description: Reburning is a combustion modification technique which removes NO{sub x} from combustion products by using fuel as a reducing agent. Previous studies have shown that natural gas is more effective than coal as a reburning fuel Objectives of this program are to define the chemical and physical constraints which prevent the attainment of 80% NO{sub x} reduction with reburning and to test improved configurations for reburning as an advanced NO{sub x} control technique for coal-fired boilers. Bench scale studies are designed to screen the chemical and physical means for enhancing reburning efficiency. Subsequent pilot studies will evaluate the impacts of finite rate mixing on the effectiveness of the various concepts. The program consists of the following: bench scale studies on N{sub 2} formation in reburning zone and XN conversion in burnout zone; pilot scale studies; interpretation and generalization, and a final report. This quarterly report documents the progress of the pilot scale studies in this reporting period. 2 figs.
Date: July 1, 1989
Creator: Chen, S. L.; Ho, L. & Seeker, W. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geologic and production characteristics of the Tight Mesaverde Group: Piceance Basin, Colorado

Description: The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over 20 years. This study provides a critical comparison of the geologic, production and reservoir characteristics of existing Mesaverde gas producing areas within the basin to those same characteristics at the MWX site near Rifle, Colorado. As will be discussed, the basin has been partitioned into three areas having similar geologic and production characteristics. Stimulation techniques have been reviewed for each partitioned area to determine the most effective stimulation technique currently used in the Mesaverde. This study emphasizes predominantly the southern Piceance Basin because of the much greater production and geologic data there. There may be Mesaverde gas production in northern areas but because of the lack of production and relatively few penetrations, the northern Piceance Basin was not included in the detailed parts of this study. 54 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.
Date: July 1, 1989
Creator: Myal, F.R.; Price, E.H.; Hill, R.E.; Kukal, G.C.; Abadie, P.A. & Riecken, C.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of injection well risk management potential in the Williston Basin

Description: The UIC regulations promulgated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) provide the EPA, or an EPA approved state agency, with authority to regulate subsurface injection of fluids to protect USDWs. Oil and gas producing industry interests are concerned primarily with Class 2 wells whose uses as defined by UIC regulations are: disposal of fluids brought to the surface and liquids generated in connection with oil and gas production (SWD); injection of fluids for enhanced oil recovery (EOR); and storage of liquid hydrocarbons. The Williston Basin was chosen for the pilot study of the feasibility of using the risk approach in managing Class 2 injection operations for the following reasons: it is one of the nine geologic basins which was classified as having a significant potential for external casing corrosion, which permitted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the injection well corrosion control measures used by industry; there are 731 active, 22 shut in and 203 temporarily abandoned SWD and water injection wells in the basin; and the basin covers three states. The broad objective of the Williston Basin study is to define requirements and to investigate the feasibility of incorporating risk management into administration of the UIC program. The study does not address the reporting aspects of UIC regulatory and compliance activities but the data base does contain essentially all the information required to develop the reports needed to monitor those activities. 16 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.
Date: September 1, 1989
Creator: none,
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery Efficiency Test Project Phase 2 activity report, Volume 1

Description: The purpose of Phase II operations of the Recovery Efficiency Test Project is to enhance the natural production of the well and evaluate the relative improvement as a function of the type of stimulation conducted. Another purpose is to compare the stimulated production performance of the horizontal well with vertical wells in the field. The objectives considered for Phase II operations and plans were: (1) Develop a rationale for a systematic approach to designing stimulations for the well. (2) Conduct a series of stimulations designed to optimize the fluids, injection rates, proppant volumes and general approach to stimulating a horizontal well with similar geologic conditions. (3) Develop and test a method or methods for determining the geometry of stimulation-induced fractures. (4) Conduct tests and analyze the results to determine the efficiency of stimulation operations. The technical approach pursued in developing plans to accomplish three objectives was to: (1) Review the data needs for all objectives and obtain that data first. (2) Identify the operating geologic, geomechanical, and reservoir parameters that need additional clarification or definition. (3) Investigate existing models which could be used to plan or evaluate stimulation on the well and the reservoir. (4) Plan for analysis and verification of models and approaches.
Date: February 1, 1989
Creator: Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P. & Locke, C.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Properties of geopressured brines and wells in the Gulf Coast and opportunities for industrial/research participation

Description: Geopressured reservoirs exhibit pressure gradients in excess of the normal hydrostatic gradient. (In the Gulf Coast area the normal gradient is 0.465 psi/ft.) Pressures may approach lithostatic pressure and have been measured as high as 1.05 psi/ft in the Gulf Coast area. Geopressured basins exist worldwide and in a number of US locations, east, west, north and south. The Gulf Coast area has been studied extensively and is the subject of the DOE geopressured-geothermal research at present. Present industrial interest in the Pleasant Bayou and Hulin wells include: desalination plants, an economic study by a power company for regional use, use of generated electricity by a coalition of towns, aquaculture (catfish farming) research program, and an unsolicited proposal for enhanced oil recovery of heavy oil. Direct uses of the hot brine cover dozens of industries and processes. An example of multiple uses in the USSR is shown. A research spin-off: a sensitive in-line benzene monitor has been designed by USL and will be tested in the near future. An in-line pH monitor is also under development for the harsh conditions of the geopressured-geothermal wells. 24 refs., 12 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Negus-de Wys, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

North American Natural Gas Markets

Description: This report summarizes die research by an Energy Modeling Forum working group on the evolution of the North American natural gas markets between now and 2010. The group's findings are based partly on the results of a set of economic models of the natural gas industry that were run for four scenarios representing significantly different conditions: two oil price scenarios (upper and lower), a smaller total US resource base (low US resource case), and increased potential gas demand for electric generation (high US demand case). Several issues, such as the direction of regulatory policy and the size of the gas resource base, were analyzed separately without the use of models.
Date: February 1, 1989
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonlinear phenomena at geological reaction fronts with energy applications

Description: Interaction of aqueous fluids with the rock matrix within which they reside can yield a variety of phenomena due to the coupling of reaction transport and mechanical processes; many of these have potentially important implications for exploration and exploitation of energy and mineral resources. We investigated effects of nucleation to produce banded precipitation; Darcy-mineral dissolution coupling to produce scalloped, fingered and more complex alteration front morphologies, and diagenetic alteration in chemically complex, multi-mineralic systems. Migration of methane driven by buoyancy effects was shown to lead to cellular and temporally oscillatory flows. Sandstones at depth experiencing pressure solution display unstable compaction leading to formation of stylolites and band-like regions of augmented compaction alternating with low porosity bands with augmented overgrowth. It was shown that transfer of natural gas from shale source rock into neighboring sandstones could occur through a series of discrete pulsatile events through a cycle of fracturing and healing.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Ortoleva, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department