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ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION

Description: Devonian gas shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky. In the shale, natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. This is analogous to methane storage in coal beds, where CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. Drill cuttings from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library were sampled to determine CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} adsorption isotherms. Sidewall core samples were acquired to investigate CO{sub 2} displacement of methane. An elemental capture spectroscopy log was acquired to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and mineralogy. Average random vitrinite reflectance data range from 0.78 to 1.59 (upper oil to wet gas and condensate hydrocarbon maturity range). Total organic content determined from acid-washed samples ranges from 0.69 to 14 percent. CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities at 400 psi range from a low of 14 scf/ton in less organic-rich zones to more than 136 scf/ton. There is a direct correlation between measured total organic carbon content and the adsorptive capacity of the shale; CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increases with increasing organic carbon content. Initial estimates based on these data indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons of CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio Shale of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker parts of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.
Date: July 29, 2005
Creator: Nuttall, Brandon C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF): Recent advances

Description: The objectives of this project are: (1)Investigate fluid rheological behavior, dynamic fluid leak-off behavior, and proppant transport characteristics of various fracturing fluids used for stimulating oil and gas bearing formations. (2) Develop new information for characterizing the behavior of fracturing fluids under conditions more representative of the behavior in actual fractures. (3) Continue utilizing the advanced capabilities of the high pressure simulator (HPS) to perform near-term research and development activities and not to construct a large-scale simulator that was proposed originally. This paper describes equipment enhancements, data acquisition and instrumentation upgrades, R&D test results, and future research planned for the Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Shah, S.N. & Fagan, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments. Quarterly technical progress report, [April 1995--June 1995]

Description: This United States Department of Energy (DOE) research project was established to document the integrated team approach for solving reservoir engineering problems. A field study integrating the disciplines of geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering will be the mechanism for documenting the integrated approach. This is an area of keen interest to the oil and gas industry. The goal will be to provide tools and approaches that can be used to detect reservoir compartments, reach a better reserve estimate, and improve profits early in the life of a field. Brief summaries are presented for reservoir characterization; documentation of the BVW-BVZ pay discrimination technique; reservoir simulation; and outcrop analog.
Date: July 21, 1995
Creator: Van Kirk, C.W. & Thompson, R.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Natural gas monthly, July 1995

Description: The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The data in this publication are collected on surveys conducted by the EIA to fulfill its responsibilities for gathering and reporting energy data. Some of the data are collected under the authority of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), an independent commission within the DOE, which has jurisdiction primarily in the regulation of electric utilities and the interstate natural gas industry. Geographic coverage is the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Explanatory Notes supplement the information found in tables of the report. A description of the data collection surveys that support the NGM is provided in the Data Sources section. A glossary of the terms used in this report is also provided to assist readers in understanding the data presented in this publication. All natural gas volumes are reported at a pressure base of 14.73 pounds per square inch absolute (psia) and at 60 degrees Fahrenheit. Cubic feet are converted to cubic meters by applying a factor of 0.02831685.
Date: July 21, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Field verification of new and novel fracture stimulation technologies for the revitalization of existing underground gas storage wells

Description: Improved, more efficient natural gas transmission and deliverability systems will be essential for meeting the expected growth in U.S. gas demand in coming decades. Role of gas storage will be important. The most cost-effective means for providing the additional seasonal storage capacity and peak-day deliverability is to improve efficiency of the existing gas storage system (370 gas storage facilities and 17,000 gas storage wells). Up to 5 new fracture stimulation techniques will be field tested. Test sites have been acquired for the 1995 RD&D program.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Reeves, S.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interim qualitative risk assessment for an LNG refueling station and review of relevant safety issues

Description: This report is a qualitative assessment of the public and worker risk involved with the operation of a liquefied natural (LNG) vehicle refueling facility. This study includes facility maintenance and operations, tanker truck delivers and end-use vehicle fueling; it does not treat the risks of LNG vehicles on roadways. Accident initiating events are identified by using a Master Logic Diagram, a Failure Modes and Effects analysis and historical operating experiences. The event trees were drawn to depict possible sequences of mitigating events following the initiating events. The phenomenology of LNG and other vehicle fuels is discussed to characterize the hazard posed by LNG usage. Based on the risk modeling and analysis, recommendations are given to improve the safety of LNG refueling stations in the areas of procedures and training, station design, and the dissemination of best practice information throughout the LNG community.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Siu, N.; Herring, S.; Cadwallader, L.; Reece, W. & Byers, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conversion economics for Alaska North Slope natural gas

Description: For the Prudhoe Bay field, this preliminary analysis provides an indication that major gas sales using a gas pipeline/LNG plant scenario, such as Trans Alaska Gas System, or a gas-to-liquids process with the cost parameters assumed, are essentially equivalent and would be viable and profitable to industry and beneficial to the state of Alaska and the federal government. The cases are compared for the Reference oil price case. The reserves would be 12.7 BBO for the base case without major gas sales, 12.3 BBO and 20 Tcf gas for the major gas sales case, and 14.3 BBO for the gas-to-liquids conversion cases. Use of different parameters will significantly alter these results; e.g., the low oil price case would result in the base case for Prudhoe Bay field becoming uneconomic in 2002 with the operating costs and investments as currently estimated.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Thomas, C.P. & Robertson, E.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The synthesis and characterization of new iron coordination complexes utilizing an asymmetric coordinating chelate ligand

Description: A binuclear, unsymmetric coordinating ligand that is an effective metal chelator has been designed and synthesized. The new ligand has been shown to react readily with iron(II)/(III) forming a variety of coordination complexes. The binuclear complexes are of significant interest since they represent proof-of-principle for the development of coordinatively asymmetric, binuclear metal chelate compounds. Although this structural type of chelator now appears to be common in biological systems, it has not been previously described for inorganic coordination chemistry. The isolation of oxidation products will be helpful in establishing reaction mechanism(s) of these complexes with molecular oxygen. It is expected that this ligand and derivatives of it will play an important role in the development of bioinorganic complexes that aim to mimic enzyme active sites that function by substrate interaction at only one metal site of a multimetal active site.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Watkins, B.E. & Satcher, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ANAEROBIC BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT OF PRODUCED WATER

Description: During the production of oil and gas, large amounts of water are brought to the surface and must be disposed of in an environmentally sensitive manner. This is an especially difficult problem in offshore production facilities where space is a major constraint. The chief regulatory criterion for produced water is oil and grease. Most facilities have little trouble meeting this criterion using conventional oil-water separation technologies. However, some operations have significant amounts of naphthenic acids in the water that behave as oil and grease but are not well removed by conventional technologies. Aerobic biological treatment of naphthenic acids in simulated-produced water has been demonstrated by others; however, the system was easily overloaded by the large amounts of low-molecular-weight organic acids often found in produced waters. The objective of this research was to determine the ability of an anaerobic biological system to treat these organic acids in a simulated produced water and to examine the potential for biodegradation of the naphthenic acids in the anaerobic environment. A small fixed-film anaerobic biological reactor was constructed and adapted to treat a simulated produced water. The bioreactor was tubular, with a low-density porous glass packing material. The inocula to the reactor was sediment from a produced-water holding pond from a municipal anaerobic digester and two salt-loving methanogenic bacteria. During start-up, the feed to the reactor contained glucose as well as typical produced-water components. When glucose was used, rapid gas production was observed. However, when glucose was eliminated and the major organic component was acetate, little gas was generated. Methane production from acetate may have been inhibited by the high salt concentrations, by sulfide, or because of the lack, despite seeding, of microbes capable of converting acetate to methane. Toluene, a minor component of the produced water (0.1 g/L) was removed in the reactor. Batch ...
Date: July 31, 2001
Creator: Gallagher, John R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seismic data acquisition through tubing

Description: We have collected good quality crosswell seismic data through production tubing in active oil fields at realistic interwell distances (300 ft). The data were collected at the Aera Cymric field (1998) and at a Chevron site (1997); both located in the Central Valley of California. The Aera data were used to produce travel-time tomographic images of the interwell region. Both sites have similar geology, namely siliceous shale (diatomite) with moderate to highly attenuating reservoir rocks. In addition we confirmed modeling predictions that typical tubing attenuation losses are on the order of 12 dB. We expect that the use of stronger sources and tube wave suppression will allow for crosswell imaging at realistic distances even for low Q or high noise situations. We are searching for an industrial partner now for a data collection in the gas wells of the San Juan Basin or South Texas.
Date: July 1, 1999
Creator: Buettner, H M & Jervis, M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pre-stack migration of three-dimensional seismic data

Description: This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project sought to develop and test a three-dimensional pre-stack migration code to run on the Los Alamos CM5. This work was done in collaboration with Texaco. The authors implemented a version of Texaco`s phase-shift with interpolation algorithm on the CM5. The authors also tested the algorithm on the Cray T3D in collaboration with Cray participants. Processing of seismic data is extremely computer and I/O intensive. The authors developed methods for efficiently performing both I/O and computing as appropriate for a large three-dimensional seismic dataset. The result was improved capability to image subsurface structures in the earth. The emphasis was on structures that are beneath salt in the US Gulf Coast, where many oil and gas reserves are known to exist but where identifying them from surface seismic data is currently difficult due to the large impedance contrast between the salt and surrounding strata.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Fehler, M.; Brickner, R.; Cheng, N.; Higginbotham, J.; House, L.; Roberts, P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stochastic imaging of oil and gas reservoirs

Description: This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In this project, we have been developing and testing methods for modelling and inversion of wave propagation through complex media. We have developed methods for modelling wave propagation in media that is characterized by both deterministic and stochastic components. Four methods have been successfully developed and tested to date: (1) an efficient but approximate method to model wave propagation in complex media, (2) an exact method for modelling wave propagation in complex media using a boundary integral approach, (3) a method for determining properties of a one-dimensional (lD) media composed of a sequence of thin layers each with random thickness and velocity, and (4) modelling of diffraction and resonance due to a low-velocity body. Our most recent efforts focused on extending the approximate method for modeling wave propagation in complex media to include the effects of singly reflected waves, which is essential for modeling seismic data collected by the petroleum industry. In addition, an effort has been made to quantify the limitations of the method.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Fehler, M.; Roberts, P.; Xie, Xiao-Bi; Benites, R. & Wu, Ru-Shan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermoacoustic natural gas liquefier

Description: This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop a natural-gas-powered natural-gas liquefier that has absolutely no moving parts and requires no electrical power. It should have high efficiency, remarkable reliability, and low cost. The thermoacoustic natural-gas liquefier (TANGL) is based on our recent invention of the first no-moving-parts cryogenic refrigerator. In short, our invention uses acoustic phenomena to produce refrigeration from heat, with no moving parts. The required apparatus comprises nothing more than heat exchangers and pipes, made of common materials, without exacting tolerances. Its initial experimental success in a small size lead us to propose a more ambitious application: large-energy liquefaction of natural gas, using combustion of natural gas as the energy source. TANGL was designed to be maintenance-free, inexpensive, portable, and environmentally benign.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Swift, G.; Gardner, D.; Hayden, M.; Radebaugh, R. & Wollan, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

Description: As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have continued to enhance and streamline our software, and we are testing the final stages of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We are continuing to process this well data and are identifying potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, preparation of the final technical report is underway.
Date: July 1, 2001
Creator: Boyer, Charles M., II & MacDonald, Ronald J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fossil Energy Program annual progress report for April 1996 through March 1997

Description: The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fossil Energy Program research and development activities, performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy, cover the areas of coal, clean coal technology, gas, petroleum, and support to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The coal activities include materials research and development; environmental analysis support; bioprocessing of coal to produce liquid or gaseous fuels; and coal combustion research. The work in support of gas technologies includes activities on the Advanced Turbine Systems Program, primarily in the materials and manufacturing aspects. Several activities are contributing to petroleum technologies in the areas of computational tools for seismic analysis and the use of bioconversion for the removal of impurities from heavy oils. This report contains 32 papers describing the various research activities, arranged under the following topical sections: materials research and development; environmental analysis support; bioprocessing research; coal combustion research; fossil fuel supply modeling and research; and advanced turbine systems.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Judkins, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Biomimetic methane oxidation. Final report, October 1, 1989--June 1, 1995

Description: Transportation fuels are a critical energy commodity and they impact nearly every sector of this country. The need for transportation fuels is projected well into the next century. Consequently, there is a strong emphasis on the economical conversion of other domestic fossil energy resources to liquid hydrocarbons that can be used as transportation fuels. Natural gas is currently a readily available resource that has a positive future outlook considering its known and anticipated reserves. There is intense government and industrial interest in developing economic technologies to convert natural gas to liquid fuels. Methane, CH{sub 4}, is the primary hydrocarbon (85-95%) in natural gas. This document covers the following: production soluable of methane monooxygenase; production of particulate methane monooxygenase; production of methane monooxygenase in continuous culture; subunit resolution for active site identification of methylosinus trichosporium OB3b soluble methane monooxygenase; the synthesis and characterization of new copper coordination complexes contairing the asymmetric coordinating chelate ligand application to enzyme active site modeling; the synthesis and characterization of new iron coordination complexes utilizing an asymmetric coordinating chelate ligand; further characterization of new bionuclear iron complexes.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Watkins, B.E.; Satcher, J.H. Jr.; Droege, M.W. & Taylor, R.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

State energy data report 1993: Consumption estimates

Description: The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.
Date: July 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Vitrification of low-level radioactive waste in a slagging combustor

Description: The suitability of a Babcock & Wilcox cyclone furnace to vitrify a low-level radioactive liquid waste was evaluated. The feed stream contained a mixture of simulated radioactive liquid waste and glass formers. The U.S. Department of Energy is testing technologies to vitrify over 60,000,000 gallons of this waste at the Hanford site. The tests reported here demonstrated the technical feasibility of Babcock & Wilcox`s cyclone vitrification technology to produce a glass for near surface disposal. Glass was produced over a period of 24-hours at a rate of 100 to 150 lb/hr. Based on glass analyses performed by an independent laboratory, all of the glass samples had leachabilities at least as low as those of the laboratory glass that the recipe was based upon. This paper presents the results of this demonstration, and includes descriptions of feed preparation, glass properties, system operation, and flue gas composition. The paper also provides discussions on key technical issues required to match cyclone furnace vitrification technology to this U.S. Department of Energy Hanford site application.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Holmes, M.J.; Downs, W. & Higley, B.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Membrane process for separating H{sub 2}S from natural gas

Description: Objective was to develop a membrane process for separating hydrogen sulfide and other impurities (CO{sub 2}, water vapor) from low-quality natural gas. A membrane material was identified with very high H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} selectivity in the range of 40--60; membrane production was scaled up to commercial size rolls; high-pressure membrane and module development and optimization were completed; and a membrane permeation flux of 4{times}10{sub {minus}6} cm{sup 3}/s{center_dot}cm{sup 2}cmHg, twice as high state-of-the-art cellulose acetate membranes, was achieved.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Baker, R.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Research program on fractured petroleum reservoirs. Second quarterly, April 1--June 30, 1995

Description: Very large compositional variation both areally and vertically has been observed in some hydrocarbon reservoirs. Several mechanisms are believed to contribute to such variations: gravitational segregation, molecular diffusion, thermal diffusion, and thermal convection. At isothermal conditions only gravitational segregation and molecular diffusion contribute to vertical compositional grading. The Gibbs segregation concept can properly account for this process. Under nonisothermal conditions, which is often the case, the process is thermodynamically irreversible and therefore Gibbs criteria of equilibrium cannot be invoked. The current literature often combines the Gibbs segregation concept and the natural convection process to formulate the interaction of convection and gravity segregation for multicomponent systems at nonisothermal conditions. The Dary law is also used without the modification of the velocity weighing for multicomponent systems. Such a formulation may not describe the process properly. This report formulates compositional variation in hydrocarbon reservoirs at nonisothermal condition. Results for the special case of gravity and thermal diffusion are also presented.
Date: July 31, 1995
Creator: Firoozabadi, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Steerable percussion air drilling system

Description: In the Steerable Percussion Air Drilling System (SPADS), air percussion is used to drill directionally in hard formations. Compared to mud or air powered PDM motors, SPADS offers directional drilling at high penetration rate, reduced mud costs, negligible formation damage, and immediate indication of hole productivity. Field tests turned up problems ranging from tool design to operation procedures; remedies were developed. There is an optimum WOB (weight on bit) at which torque is reasonably low. The hammer was tested at three different line pressures (200, 300, 350 psig) at optimum WOB in granite, limestone, and sandstone.
Date: July 1, 1995
Creator: Bui, H.D.; Gray, M.A. & Oliver, M.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Technologies for Distributed Energy Resources. Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Technical Assistance Fact Sheet

Description: This four-page fact sheet describes distributed energy resources for Federal facilities, which are being supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). Distributed energy resources include both existing and emerging energy technologies: advanced industrial turbines and microturbines; combined heat and power (CHP) systems; fuel cells; geothermal systems; natural gas reciprocating engines; photovoltaics and other solar systems; wind turbines; small, modular biopower; energy storage systems; and hybrid systems. DOE FEMP is investigating ways to use these alternative energy systems in government facilities to meet greater demand, to increase the reliability of the power-generation system, and to reduce the greenhouse gases associated with burning fossil fuels.
Date: July 16, 2001
Creator: Pitchford, P. & Brown, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Distributed Energy Resources at Federal Facilities. Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Technical Assistance Fact Sheet

Description: This two-page overview describes how the use of distributed energy resources at Federal facilities is being supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). Distributed energy resources include both existing and emerging energy technologies: advanced industrial turbines and microturbines; combined heat and power (CHP) systems; fuel cells; geothermal systems; natural gas reciprocating engines; photovoltaics and other solar systems; wind turbines; small, modular biopower; energy storage systems; and hybrid systems. DOE FEMP is investigating ways to use these alternative energy systems in government facilities to meet greater demand, to increase the reliability of the power-generation system, and to reduce the greenhouse gases associated with burning fossil fuels.
Date: July 16, 2001
Creator: Pitchford, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT - Final Report

Description: Asea Brown Boveri (ABB) has completed its technology based program. The results developed under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 8, concentrated on technology development and demonstration have been partially implemented in newer turbine designs. A significant improvement in heat rate and power output has been demonstrated. ABB will use the knowledge gained to further improve the efficiency of its Advanced Cycle System, which has been developed and introduced into the marked out side ABB's Advanced Turbine System (ATS) activities. The technology will lead to a power plant design that meets the ATS performance goals of over 60% plant efficiency, decreased electricity costs to consumers and lowest emissions.
Date: July 15, 2000
Creator: Mayer, Albrecht H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department