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Natural Gas for Cars and Trucks: Options and Challenges

Description: The increase in domestic supplies of natural gas has raised new interest in expanding its use in the transportation sector. This report considers issues related to wider use of natural gas as a fuel in passenger cars and commercial vehicles.
Date: November 19, 2014
Creator: Canis, Bill; Pirog, Robert & Yacobucci, Brent D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Winter fuels report. Week ending: October 13, 1995

Description: The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s, as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6--10-Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city. This report is published weekly by the EIA starting the second week in October 1995 and will continue until the second week in April 1996. The data will also be available electronically after 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday during the heating season through the EIA Electronic Publication System (EPUB). 36 figs., 13 tabs.
Date: October 19, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

US energy industry financial developments, First quarter 1995

Description: This report traces key developments in US energy companies` financial performance for the first quarter of 1995. Financial data (only available for publicly-traded US companies) are included in two broad groups -- fossil fuel production and rate-regulated utilities. All financial data are taken from public sources such as corporate reports and press releases, energy trade publications, and The Wall Street Journal`s Earnings Digest. Return on equity is calculated from data available from Standard and Poor`s Compustat data service. Since several major petroleum companies disclose their income by lines of business and geographic area, these data are also presented in this report. Although the disaggregated income concept varies by company and is not strictly comparable to corporate income, relative movements in income by lines of business and geographic area are summarized as useful indicators of short-term changes in the underlying profitability of these operations.
Date: June 19, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Clean Cities Award Winning Coalition: Atlanta

Description: The Atlanta Clean City was the first to join the program in 1993, and has been successfully spreading the word about the benefits of alternative fuels ever since. They have already surpassed their year 2000 goal of operating more than 2,600 alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). More than 30 stakeholders continue to help spur the Atlanta AFV market development by implementing innovative alternative fuel projects. Stakeholders actively support legislation that encourages the use of AFVs and sponsor workshops on advancing the choice.
Date: May 19, 1999
Creator: Kaiser, ICF
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Clean Cities Award Winning Coalition: Chicago

Description: The Chicago area coalition marks its five-year anniversary in 1999 as a member of the Clean Cities Program. Their progress in the last five years has been remarkable as they advance the alternative fuel and vehicle markets, increase coalition membership, help support new alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) legislation, and educate fleet managers. The coalition boasts more than 90 stakeholders, including industry, government, environmental and academic organizations, and membership continues to grow. Thanks to dedicated coalition members' efforts, a variety of AFVs can be seen on Chicago's streets, including transit and school buses, taxicabs, sedans, vans, and trucks.
Date: May 19, 1999
Creator: Kaiser, ICF
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Clean Cities Award Winning Coalition: Denver

Description: The cities of Denver and Boulder comprise the Denver Clean Cities Coalition. They are committed to cleaner fuels, greener fleets, and bluer skies. More than 25 active stakeholders, including local government agencies, utilities, and private organizations, work together to advance alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles in the region. The city of Denver boasts several neighborhood electric vehicles for employees' use around town. The coalition has also sponsored alternative fuel workshops, special events, and has been successful in passing major alternative fuels legislation.
Date: May 19, 1999
Creator: Kaiser, ICF
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Clean Cities Award Winning Coalition: Los Angeles

Description: As the second largest city in the United States, Los Angeles has more than 9 million motor vehicles on the road, accounting for up to 60% of the region's air pollution. Clean Cities Los Angeles has pioneered efforts in implementing innovation pollution reduction strategies, using alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). More than 475 compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, and electric vehicles (EVs) have been incorporated into city fleets. They've also launched Quick Charge L.A., a comprehensive EV infrastructure program that has established almost 200 EV charging stations at workplaces, event centers, rail stations, and other sites throughout the city. Clean Cities Los Angeles also leads the way in securing grants for AFV projects.
Date: May 19, 1999
Creator: Kaiser, ICF
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Clean Cities Award Winning Coalition: San Diego

Description: Stakeholders in the San Diego coalition have already helped remove about 125 tons of nitrogen oxides and 867 tons of carbon dioxide every year since their inception in 1996. They are proud of their numerous accomplishments, including the San Diego Gas and Electric's installation of a solar chargeport, which can charge up to six electric vehicles simultaneously and at no cost. San Diego Regional Clean Cities Coalition will also soon be home to the first alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) showroom in the world, as the Regional Transportation Center plans to open during the summer of 2000. The million-dollar facility will display the latest AFV models, rent and demonstrate vehicles, and offer a fueling and service center with public access. An educational center is also part of the plan.
Date: May 19, 1999
Creator: Kaiser, ICF
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dodge B2500 dedicated CNG van

Description: The US Department of Energy (DOE) is promoting the use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). To support this activity, DOE has directed the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to conduct projects to evaluate the performance and acceptability of light-duty AFVs. The authors tested a 1999 B2500 dedicated CNG Ram Wagon with a 5.2L V8 engine. The vehicle was run through a series of tests explained briefly in this fact sheet.
Date: April 19, 2000
Creator: Eudy, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of AEO 2006 Natural Gas Price Forecast to NYMEX FuturesPrices

Description: On December 12, 2005, the reference case projections from ''Annual Energy Outlook 2006'' (AEO 2006) were posted on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) web site. We at LBNL have in the past compared the EIA's reference case long-term natural gas price forecasts from the AEO series to contemporaneous natural gas prices that can be locked in through the forward market, with the goal of better understanding fuel price risk and the role that renewables play in mitigating such risk (see, for example, http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf). As such, we were curious to see how the latest AEO gas price forecast compares to the NYMEX natural gas futures strip. This brief memo presents our findings. As a refresher, our past work in this area has found that over the past five years, forward natural gas contracts (with prices that can be locked in--e.g., gas futures, swaps, and physical supply) have traded at a premium relative to contemporaneous long-term reference case gas price forecasts from the EIA. As such, we have concluded that, over the past five years at least, levelized cost comparisons of fixed-price renewable generation with variable price gas-fired generation that have been based on AEO natural gas price forecasts (rather than forward prices) have yielded results that are ''biased'' in favor of gas-fired generation, presuming that long-term price stability is valued. In this memo we simply update our past analysis to include the latest long-term gas price forecast from the EIA, as contained in AEO 2006. For the sake of brevity, we do not rehash information (on methodology, potential explanations for the premiums, etc.) contained in our earlier reports on this topic; readers interested in such information are encouraged to download that work from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/reports/53587.pdf or http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/ems/reports/54751.pdf. As was the case in the past five AEO releases (AEO 2001-AEO 2005), ...
Date: December 19, 2005
Creator: Bolinger, Mark & Wiser, Ryan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DETECTION OF UNAUTHORIZED CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT IN PIPELINE RIGHT-OF-WAYS

Description: Natural gas transmission companies mark the right-of-way areas where pipelines are buried with warning signs to prevent accidental third-party damage. Nevertheless, pipelines are sometimes damaged by third-party construction equipment. A single incident can be devastating, causing death and millions of dollars of property loss. This damage would be prevented if potentially hazardous construction equipment could be detected, identified, and an alert given before the pipeline was damaged. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) is developing a system to solve this problem by using an optical fiber as a distributed sensor and interrogating the fiber with an custom optical time domain reflectometer. Key issues are the ability to detect encroachment and the ability to discriminate among potentially hazardous and benign encroachments. The work performed in the third quarter of the project (2nd quarter of 2002) includes design of the diode laser driver and high-speed detector electronics and programming of the custom optical time domain reflectometer.
Date: July 19, 2002
Creator: Huebler, James E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of slurry injection technology for management of drilling wastes.

Description: Each year, thousands of new oil and gas wells are drilled in the United States and around the world. The drilling process generates millions of barrels of drilling waste each year, primarily used drilling fluids (also known as muds) and drill cuttings. The drilling wastes from most onshore U.S. wells are disposed of by removing the liquids from the drilling or reserve pits and then burying the remaining solids in place (called pit burial). This practice has low cost and the approval of most regulatory agencies. However, there are some environmental settings in which pit burial is not allowed, such as areas with high water tables. In the U.S. offshore environment, many water-based and synthetic-based muds and cuttings can be discharged to the ocean if discharge permit requirements are met, but oil-based muds cannot be discharged at all. At some offshore facilities, drilling wastes must be either hauled back to shore for disposal or disposed of onsite through an injection process.
Date: February 19, 2003
Creator: Veil, J. A. & Dusseault, M. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1999 annual progress report -- Energy conservation team

Description: This report highlights progress achieved during FY 1999 under the Light-duty Fuels Utilization R and D Program. The program is comprised of two elements: the Advanced Petroleum-Based APB Fuels Program which focused on developing and testing advanced fuels for use with compression-ignition direct-injection (CIDI) engines and fuel cells and the Alternative Fuels Program which focused on Natural gas and natural gas derived fuels. The report contains 17 summaries of industry and National Laboratory projects. Fuel efficient vehicles with very low emissions are essential to meet the challenges of climate change, energy security, and improved air quality. The authors anticipate cooperative efforts with the auto and energy industries to develop new and innovative technologies that will be used to make advanced transportation vehicles that are fuel efficient, clean, and safe.
Date: October 19, 1999
Creator: Chalk, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CALGRID Photochemical Modeling of Air Quality Impacts of Alternative Transportation Fuel Use in Los Angeles

Description: The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive program to quantify and assess the air quality impacts of the emissions of ozone precursors, air toxins, and greenhouse gases from alternative fuel vehicles. This program includes both an emissions estimation component and a photochemical modeling component to study three fuels: reformulated gasoline, compressed natural gas, and 85% methanol (M85). This report describes the use of the CALGRID model in the Los Angeles modeling domain using the State-Wide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC90) chemical mechanism and an early version of the SAPRC93 mechanism. A variety of conclusions can be drawn from the results of this study, including results from chemical mechanism testing; development of meteorological inputs; model evaluation and comparison; and the analyses of the impacts of the emissions scenarios. The report summarizes the study's major findings in these areas.
Date: November 19, 1998
Creator: Moore, G. E.; Londergan, R. J. & Fernau, M. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Particulate Measurements and Emissions Characterization of Alternative Fuel Vehicle Exhaust

Description: The objective of this project was to measure and characterize particulate emissions from light-duty alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and equivalent gasoline-fueled vehicles. The project included emission testing of a fleet of 129 gasoline-fueled vehicles and 19 diesel vehicles. Particulate measurements were obtained over Federal Test Procedure and US06 cycles. Chemical characterization of the exhaust particulate was also performed. Overall, the particulate emissions from modern technology compressed natural gas and methanol vehicles were low, but were still comparable to those of similar technology gasoline vehicles.
Date: November 19, 1998
Creator: Durbin, T. D.; Truex, T. J. & Norbeck, J. M. (Center for Environmental Research and Technology College of Engineering, University of California - Riverside, California)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Displacing Coal with Generation from Existing Natural Gas-Fired Power Plants

Description: This report provides an overview of the issues involved in displacing coal-fired generation with electricity from existing and underutilized natural gas plants in order to cut greenhouse gas emissions. Reducing carbon dioxide emissions from coal plants is a focus of many proposals for cutting greenhouse gas emissions.
Date: January 19, 2010
Creator: Kaplan, Stan M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Low Pressure Storage of Natural Gas for Vehicular Applications

Description: Natural gas is an attractive fuel for vehicles because it is a relatively clean-burning fuel compared with gasoline. Moreover, methane can be stored in the physically adsorbed state [at a pressure of 3.5 MPa (500 psi)] at energy densities comparable to methane compressed at 24.8 MPa (3600 psi). Here we report the development of natural gas storage monoliths [1]. The monolith manufacture and activation methods are reported along with pore structure characterization data. The storage capacities of these monoliths are measured gravimetrically at a pressure of 3.5 MPa (500 psi) and ambient temperature, and storage capacities of >150 V/V have been demonstrated and are reported.
Date: June 19, 2000
Creator: Burchell, Tim & Rogers, Mike
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program: Progress and Highlights

Description: The Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials Program was begun in 1997 to support the enabling materials needs of the DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). The technical agenda for the program grew out of the technology roadmap for the OHVT and includes efforts in materials for: fuel systems, exhaust aftertreatment, valve train, air handling, structural components, electrochemical propulsion, natural gas storage, and thermal management. A five-year program plan was written in early 2000, following a stakeholders workshop. The technical issues and planned and ongoing projects are discussed. Brief summaries of several technical highlights are given.
Date: June 19, 2000
Creator: Johnson, D. Ray & Diamond, Sidney
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Liquefied Natural Gas for Trucks and Buses

Description: Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is being developed as a heavy vehicle fuel. The reason for developing LNG is to reduce our dependency on imported oil by eliminating technical and costs barriers associated with its usage. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a program, currently in its third year, to develop and advance cost-effective technologies for operating and refueling natural gas-fueled heavy vehicles (Class 7-8 trucks). The objectives of the DOE Natural Gas Vehicle Systems Program are to achieve market penetration by reducing vehicle conversion and fuel costs, to increase consumer acceptance by improving the reliability and efficiency, and to improve air quality by reducing tailpipe emissions. One way to reduce fuel costs is to develop new supplies of cheap natural gas. Significant progress is being made towards developing more energy-efficient, low-cost, small-scale natural gas liquefiers for exploiting alternative sources of natural gas such as from landfill and remote gas sites. In particular, the DOE program provides funds for research and development in the areas of; natural gas clean up, LNG production, advanced vehicle onboard storage tanks, improved fuel delivery systems and LNG market strategies. In general, the program seeks to integrate the individual components being developed into complete systems, and then demonstrate the technology to establish technical and economic feasibility. The paper also reviews the importance of cryogenics in designing LNG fuel delivery systems.
Date: June 19, 2000
Creator: Wegrzyn, James & Gurevich, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Emissions from Trucks using Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Fuel

Description: The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process can be used to synthesize diesel fuels from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuels may also be economically competitive with California B- diesel fuel if produced in large volumes. overview of Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel production and engine emissions testing is presented. Previous engine laboratory tests indicate that F-T diesel is a promising alternative fuel because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and substantial exhaust emissions reductions can be realized. The authors have performed preliminary tests to assess the real-world performance of F-T diesel fuels in heavy-duty trucks. Seven White-GMC Class 8 trucks equipped with Caterpillar 10.3 liter engines were tested using F-T diesel fuel. Vehicle emissions tests were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The trucks were found to perform adequately on neat F-T diesel fuel. Compared to a California diesel fuel baseline, neat F-T diesel fuel emitted about 12% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 24% lower particulate matter over a five-mile driving cycle.
Date: October 19, 1998
Creator: Norton, Paul; Vertin, Keith; Bailey, Brent; Clark, Nigel N.; Lyons, Donald W.; Goguen, Stephen et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Health, Safety, and Environmental Screening and Ranking Frameworkfor Geologic CO2 Storage Site Selection

Description: This report describes a screening and ranking framework(SRF) developed to evaluate potential geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites on the basis of health, safety, and environmental (HSE) risk arising from possible CO2 leakage. The approach is based on the assumption that HSE risk due to CO2 leakage is dependent on three basic characteristics of a geologic CO2 storage site: (1) the potential for primary containment by the target formation; (2) the potential for secondary containment if the primary formation leaks; and (3) the potential for attenuation and dispersion of leaking CO2 if the primary formation leaks and secondary containment fails. The framework is implemented in a spreadsheet in which users enter numerical scores representing expert opinions or general information available from published materials along with estimates of uncertainty to evaluate the three basic characteristics in order to screen and rank candidate sites. Application of the framework to the Rio Visa Gas Field, Ventura Oil Field, and Mammoth Mountain demonstrates the approach. Refinements and extensions are possible through the use of more detailed data or model results in place of property proxies. Revisions and extensions to improve the approach are anticipated in the near future as it is used and tested by colleagues and collaborators.
Date: September 19, 2005
Creator: Oldenburg, Curtis M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Efficiency Liquid-Desiccant Regenerator for Air Conditioning and Industrial Drying

Description: Over 2 quads of fossil fuels are used each year for moisture removal. This includes industrial and agricultural processes where feedstocks and final products must be dried, as well as comfort conditioning of indoor spaces where the control of humidity is essential to maintaining healthy, productive and comfortable working conditions. Desiccants, materials that have a high affinity for water vapor, can greatly reduce energy use for both drying and dehumidification. An opportunity exists to greatly improve the competitiveness of advanced liquid-desiccant systems by increasing the efficiency of their regenerators. It is common practice within the chemical process industry to use multiple stage boilers to improve the efficiency of thermal separation processes. The energy needed to regenerate a liquid desiccant, which is a thermal separation process, can also be reduced by using a multiple stage boiler. In this project, a two-stage regenerator was developed in which the first stage is a boiler and the second stage is a scavenging-air regenerator. The only energy input to this regenerator is the natural gas that fires the boiler. The steam produced in the boiler provides the thermal energy to run the second-stage scavenging-air regenerator. This two-stage regenerator is referred to as a 1?-effect regenerator. A model of the high-temperature stage of a 1?-effect regenerator for liquid desiccants was designed, built and successfully tested. At nominal operating conditions (i.e., 2.35 gpm of 36% lithium chloride solution, 307,000 Btu/h firing rate), the boiler removed 153 lb/h of water from the desiccant at a gas-based efficiency of 52.9 % (which corresponds to a COP of 0.95 when a scavenging-air regenerator is added). The steam leaving the boiler, when condensed, had a solids concentration of less than 10 ppm. This low level of solids in the condensate places an upper bound of about 6 lb per year for ...
Date: December 19, 2005
Creator: Lowenstein, Andrew
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission, Integrated Process Heater System

Description: The team of TIAX LLC, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, and Callidus Technologies, LLC conducted a six-year program to develop an ultra-low emission process heater burner and an advanced high efficiency heater design. This project addresses the critical need of process heater operators for reliable, economical emission reduction technologies to comply with stringent emission regulations, and for heater design alternatives that reduce process heater energy requirements without significant cost increase. The key project targets were NOx emissions of 10 ppm (@ 3% O2), and a heater thermal efficiency of 95 percent. The ultra low NOx burner was developed through a series of pilot-scale and field tests combined with computational fluid dynamic modeling to arrive at simultaneous low emissions and suitable flame shape and stability. Pilot scale tests were run at TIAX, at the 2 MMBtu/hr scale, and at Callidus at 8 MMBtu/hr. The full scale burner was installed on a 14 burner atmospheric pipestill furnace at an ExxonMobil refinery. A variety of burner configurations, gas tips and flame stabilizers were tested to determine the lowest emissions with acceptable flame shape and stability. The resulting NOx emissions were 22 ppm on average. Starting in 2001, Callidus commercialized the original ultra low NOx burner and made subsequent design improvements in a series of commercial burners evolving from the original concept and/or development. Emissions in the field with the ultra low-NOx burner over a broad spectrum of heater applications have varied from 5 ppm to 30 ppm depending on heater geometry, heater service, fuel and firing capacity. To date, 1550 of the original burners, and 2500 of subsequent generation burners have been sold by Callidus. The advanced heater design was developed by parametric evaluations of a variety of furnace and combustion air preheater configurations and technologies for enhancing convective and radiative heat transfer. ...
Date: June 19, 2006
Creator: Mason, Howard; Boral, Anindya; Chhotray, San & Martin, Matthew
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THE ORIGIN OF LIFE ON EARTH AND ELSEWHERE. II

Description: The synthesis of relatively complex organic molecules by ionizing and radical mechanisms (induced by high energy radiations, ultraviolet and electric discharge) from methane, ammonia, water, and hydrogen is described, both theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that the molecules which tend to be formed under such random conditions are the very ones which today are the common building blocks in the biological reconstruction of organic material. Such molecules are the amino acids, the simple carboxylic and hydroxy acids, purines, pyrimidines, etc. The appearance of order among such random molecules is induced by two forces, namely, autocatalysis and crystallization. The latter is particularly important in the appearance of highly efficient macromolecular structures and arrangements which are so characteristic of present-day living organisms. Points of contact of these theories with experiment are indicated, and where confirmation has been obtained it is described, and the areas of ignorance, requiring further experimentation, are defined. A first step in a possible test of these prebiotic organic syntheses on other astral bodies has been made by examining the organic material found in meteorites. The nature of the structures appearing therein is indicated.
Date: October 19, 1960
Creator: Calvin, Melvin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department