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Intelligent Targeting for a Remotely Operated, Rapid Aiming Weapon Platform

Description: Sandia National Laboratories has been investigating the use of remotely operated weapon platforms in Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. These platforms offer significant force multiplication and enhancement by enabling near instantaneous response to attackers, increasing targeting accuracy, removing personnel from direct weapon fire, providing immunity to suppressive fire, and reducing security force size needed to effectively respond. Test results of the Telepresent Rapid Aiming Platform (TRAP) from Precision Remotes, Inc. have been exceptional and response from DOE sites and the U.S. Air Force is enthusiastic. Although this platform performs comparably to a trained marksman, the target acquisition speeds are up to three times longer. TRAP is currently enslaved to a remote operator's joystick. Tracking moving targets with a joystick is difficult; it dependent upon target range, movement patterns, and operator skill. Even well-trained operators encounter difficulty tracking moving targets. Adding intelligent targeting capabilities on a weapon platform such as TRAP would significantly improve security force response in terms of effectiveness and numbers of responders. The initial goal of this project was to integrate intelligent targeting with TRAP. However, the unavailability of a TRAP for laboratory purposes drove the development of a new platform that simulates TRAP but has a greater operating range and is significantly faster to reposition.
Date: November 1, 2002
Creator: NELSON, CYNTHIA L. & CARLSON, JEFFREY J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Database design document (DBDD) for the enhanced logistics intratheater support tool (ELIST) database segment version 8.1.0.0 for solaris 7.

Description: This document is the Database Design Document for the Enhanced Logistics Intratheater Support Tool (ELIST) Database Segment. It describes the physical database design used by the ELIST mission application.
Date: March 6, 2002
Creator: Robinson, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Route and landmark selection tool (RULST) : user's manual.

Description: The Route and Landmark Selection Tool (RULST) is a software program designed to assist military planners in defining geographical objects, such as routes, landmarks, spurs, and yards, at a given facility. Argonne National Laboratory is currently developing a prototype of this tool for use by the Military Traffic Management Command Transportation Engineering Agency (MTMCTEA). The primary objective of RULST is to populate database tables of facility objects for use in MTMCTEA models. RULST defines facility data for use in models such as Port Simulation (PORTSIM) and Transportation System Capability (TRANSCAP), which simulate the transportation of equipment through ports and military installations. The main purpose of RULST is to allow you to specify the relationships between landmarks and routes. The nodes, links, and landmarks that describe a facility are often predefined on the basis of the layout of the physical site.
Date: April 12, 2002
Creator: Widing, M. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Regional Dynamic Simulation Modeling and Analysis of Integrated Energy Futures

Description: The Global Energy Futures Model (GEFM) is a demand-based, gross domestic product (GDP)-driven, dynamic simulation tool that provides an integrated framework to model key aspects of energy, nuclear-materials storage and disposition, environmental effluents from fossil and non fossil energy and global nuclear-materials management. Based entirely on public source data, it links oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear and renewable energy dynamically to greenhouse-gas emissions and 12 other measures of environmental impact. It includes historical data from 1990 to 2000, is benchmarked to the DOE/EIA/IEO 2001 [5] Reference Case for 2000 to 2020, and extrapolates energy demand through the year 2050. The GEFM is globally integrated, and breaks out five regions of the world: United States of America (USA), the Peoples Republic of China (China), the former Soviet Union (FSU), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations excluding the USA (other industrialized countries), and the rest of the world (ROW) (essentially the developing world). The GEFM allows the user to examine a very wide range of ''what if'' scenarios through 2050 and to view the potential effects across widely dispersed, but interrelated areas. The authors believe that this high-level learning tool will help to stimulate public policy debate on energy, environment, economic and national security issues.
Date: November 1, 2002
Creator: MALCZYNSKI, LEONARD A.; BEYELER, WALTER E.; CONRAD, STEPHEN H.; HARRIS, DAVID B; REXROTH, PAUL E. & BAKER, ARNOLD B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Will Duct Tape and Plastic Really Work? Issues Related to Expedient Shelter-In-Place

Description: Expedient sheltering involves the use of common materials to enhance the safety of a room inside a building against the impacts of a chemical plume. The central premise behind taping and sealing with duct tape and plastic is to reduce airflow into a room. This paper reviews issues associated with the use of expedient sheltering materials and the effectiveness of this strategy. Expedient sheltering provides additional protection to people sheltering in place beyond that provided by the house and by a safe room without expedient measures. The materials chosen for taping and sealing--duct tape and plastic--are appropriate because they effectively reduce infiltration and the materials should withstand a vapor challenge. Taping is essential to reduce air infiltration. Plastic sheeting is not a critical element for reducing air infiltration, but it makes sealing off large windows easier.
Date: August 30, 2002
Creator: Sorensen, J. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laser Safety Evaluation of the Oscmar M203PI Grenade Launcher Simulator (GLS) and the Associated Umpire Control Gun

Description: A laser safety evaluation and pertinent output measurements were performed (during March and April 2002) on the M203PI Grenade Launcher Simulator (GLS) and its associated Umpire Control Gun manufactured by Oscmar International Limited, Auckland, New Zealand. The results were the Oscmar Umpire Gun is laser hazard Class 1 and can be used without restrictions. The radiant energy output of the Oscmar M203PI GLS, under ''Small Source'' criteria at 10 centimeters, is laser hazard Class 3b and not usable, under SNL policy, in force-on-force exercises. However, due to a relatively large exit diameter and an intentionally large beam divergence, to simulate a large area blast, the output beam geometry met the criteria for ''Extended Source'' viewing [ANSI Std. 2136.1-2000 (S.l)]. Under this ''Extended Source'' criteria the output of the M203PI GLS unit was, in fact, laser hazard Class 1 (eye safe), for 3 of the 4 possible modes of laser operation. The 4'h mode, ''Auto Fire'', which simulates a continuous grenade firing every second and is not used at SNL, was laser hazard Class 3a (under the ''Extended Source'' viewing criteria). The M203PI GLS does present a laser hazard Class 3a to aided viewing with binoculars inside 3 meters from the unit. Farther than 3 meters it is ''eye safe''. The M203PI GLS can be considered a Class 1 laser hazard and can be used under SNL policy with the following restrictions: (1) The M203PI GLS unit shall only be programmed for: the ''Single Fire'' (which, includes ''Rapid Fire'') and the ''Auto Align'' (used in adjusting the alignment of the grenade launcher simulator system to the target) modes of operation. (2) The M203PI GLS shall never be directed against personnel, using binoculars, inside of 3 meters. DOE Order 5480.16A, Firearms Safety, (Chapter 1)(5)(a)(8)(d) and DOE-STD-1091-96, Firearms Safety (Chapter 4); already prevents ...
Date: June 1, 2002
Creator: Augustoni, Arnold L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation Techniques and Properties of an Exact Solution to a Subsonic Free Surface Jet Flow

Description: Computational techniques for the evaluation of steady plane subsonic flows represented by Chaplygin series in the hodograph plane are presented. These techniques are utilized to examine the properties of the free surface wall jet solution. This solution is a prototype for the shaped charge jet, a problem which is particularly difficult to compute properly using general purpose finite element or finite difference continuum mechanics codes. The shaped charge jet is a classic validation problem for models involving high explosives and material strength. Therefore, the problem studied in this report represents a useful verification problem associated with shaped charge jet modeling.
Date: April 1, 2002
Creator: ROBINSON, ALLEN C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sandia SCADA Program -- High Surety SCADA LDRD Final Report

Description: Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems are a part of the nation's critical infrastructure that is especially vulnerable to attack or disruption. Sandia National Laboratories is developing a high-security SCADA specification to increase the national security posture of the U.S. Because SCADA security is an international problem and is shaped by foreign and multinational interests, Sandia is working to develop a standards-based solution through committees such as the IEC TC 57 WG 15, the IEEE Substation Committee, and the IEEE P1547-related activity on communications and controls. The accepted standards are anticipated to take the form of a Common Criteria Protection Profile. This report provides the status of work completed and discusses several challenges ahead.
Date: April 1, 2002
Creator: CARLSON, ROLF E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CONTRIBUTORS TO HUMAN ERRORS AND BREACHES IN NATIONAL SECURITY APPLICATIONS.

Description: Los Alamos National Laboratory has recognized that security infractions are often the consequence of various types of human errors (e.g., mistakes, lapses, slips) and/or breaches (i.e., deliberate deviations from policies or required procedures with no intention to bring about an adverse security consequence) and therefore has established an error reduction program based in part on the techniques used to mitigate hazard and accident potentials. One cornerstone of this program, definition of the situational and personal factors that increase the likelihood of employee errors and breaches, is detailed here. This information can be used retrospectively (as in accident investigations) to support and guide inquiries into security incidents or prospectively (as in hazard assessments) to guide efforts to reduce the likelihood of error/incident occurrence. Both approaches provide the foundation for targeted interventions to reduce the influence of these factors and for the formation of subsequent ''lessons learned.'' Overall security is enhanced not only by reducing the inadvertent releases of classified information but also by reducing the security and safeguards resources devoted to them, thereby allowing these resources to be concentrated on acts of malevolence.
Date: August 30, 2002
Creator: POND, DANIEL J; HOUGHTON, F KAY & GILMORE, WALTER E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear War Survival Skills

Description: The purpose of this book is to provide Americans with information and instructions that will significantly increase their chances of surviving a possible nuclear attack. It brings together field-tested instructions that, if followed by a large fraction of Americans during a crisis that preceded an attack, could save millions of lives. The author is convinced that the vulnerability of our country to nuclear threat or attack must be reduced and that the wide dissemination of the information contained in this book would help achieve that objective of our overall defense strategy.
Date: June 24, 2002
Creator: Kearny, C.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 5: Landfills, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0) includes Record of Technical Change No. 1 (dated 9/17/2002)

Description: This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 5 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 5 consists of eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 05-15-01, Sanitary Landfill; 05-16-01, Landfill; 06-08-01, Landfill; 06-15-02, Sanitary Landfill; 06-15-03, Sanitary Landfill; 12-15-01, Sanitary Landfill; 20-15-01, Landfill; 23-15-03, Disposal Site. Located between Areas 5, 6, 12, 20, and 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), CAU 5 consists of unlined landfills used in support of disposal operations between 1952 and 1992. Large volumes of solid waste were produced from the projects which used the CAU 5 landfills. Waste disposed in these landfills may be present without appropriate controls (i.e., use restrictions, adequate cover) and hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present at concentrations and locations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment. During the 1992 to 1995 time frame, the NTS was used for various research and development projects including nuclear weapons testing. Instead of managing solid waste at one or two disposal sites, the practice on the NTS was to dispose of solid waste in the vicinity of the project. A review of historical documentation, process knowledge, personal interviews, and inferred activities associated with this CAU identified the following as potential contaminants of concern: volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, petroleum hydrocarbons (diesel- and gasoline-range organics), Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Metals, plus nickel and zinc. A two-phase approach has been selected to collect information and generate data to satisfy needed resolution criteria and resolve the decision statements. Phase I will concentrate on geophysical surveys to confirm the presence or absence of ...
Date: May 28, 2002
Creator: IT Corporation, Las Vegas, NV
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement and Model for Hazardous Chemical and Mixed Waste

Description: Mixed solvent aqueous waste of various chemical compositions constitutes a significant fraction of the total waste produced by industry in the United States. Not only does the chemical process industry create large quantities of aqueous waste, but the majority of the waste inventory at the Department of Energy (DOE) sites previously used for nuclear weapons production is mixed solvent aqueous waste. In addition, large quantities of waste are expected to be generated in the clean-up of those sites. In order to effectively treat, safely handle, and properly dispose of these wastes, accurate and comprehensive knowledge of basic thermophysical properties is essential. The goal of this work is to develop a phase equilibrium model for mixed solvent aqueous solutions containing salts. An equation of state was sought for these mixtures that (a) would require a minimum of adjustable parameters and (b) could be obtained from a available data or data that were easily measured. A model was developed to predict vapor composition and pressure given the liquid composition and temperature. It is based on the Peng-Robinson equation of state, adapted to include non-volatile and salt components. The model itself is capable of predicting the vapor-liquid equilibria of a wide variety of systems composed of water, organic solvents, salts, nonvolatile solutes, and acids or bases. The representative system of water + acetone + 2-propanol + NaNO3 was selected to test and verify the model. Vapor-liquid equilibrium and phase density measurements were performed for this system and its constituent binaries.
Date: July 30, 2002
Creator: Mullins, Michael E.; Rogers, Tony N.; Outcalt, Stephanie L.; Louie, Beverly; Watts, Laurel A. & Holcomb, Cynthia D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Nuclear Security Administration Knowledge Base Core Table Schema Document

Description: The National Nuclear Security Administration is creating a Knowledge Base to store technical information to support the United States nuclear explosion monitoring mission. This document defines the core database tables that are used in the Knowledge Base. The purpose of this document is to present the ORACLE database tables in the NNSA Knowledge Base that on modifications to the CSS3.0 Database Schema developed in 1990. (Anderson et al., 1990). These modifications include additional columns to the affiliation table, an increase in the internal ORACLE format from 8 integers to 9 integers for thirteen IDs, and new primary and unique key definitions for six tables. It is intended to be used as a reference by researchers inside and outside of NNSA/DOE as they compile information to submit to the NNSA Knowledge Base. These ''core'' tables are separated into two groups. The Primary tables are dynamic and consist of information that can be used in automatic and interactive processing (e.g. arrivals, locations). The Lookup tables change infrequently and are used for auxiliary information used by the processing. In general, the information stored in the core tables consists of: arrivals; events, origins, associations of arrivals; magnitude information; station information (networks, site descriptions, instrument responses); pointers to waveform data; and comments pertaining to the information. This document is divided into four sections, the first being this introduction. Section two defines the sixteen tables that make up the core tables of the NNSA Knowledge Base database. Both internal (ORACLE) and external formats for the attributes are defined, along with a short description of each attribute. In addition, the primary, unique and foreign keys are defined. Section three of the document shows the relationships between the different tables by using entity-relationship diagrams. The last section, defines the columns or attributes of the various tables. Information that ...
Date: September 1, 2002
Creator: CARR,DORTHE B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Low Dose Studies with Focused X-Rays in cell and Tissue Models: Mechanisms of Bystander and Genomic Instability Responses

Description: The management of the risks of exposure of people to ionizing radiation is important in relation to its uses in industry and medicine, also to natural and man-made radiation in the environment. The vase majority of exposures are at a very low level of radiation dose. The risks are of inducing cancer in the exposed individuals and a smaller risk of inducing genetic damage that can be indicate that they are low. As a result, the risks are impossible to detect in population studies with any accuracy above the normal levels of cancer and genetic defects unless the dose levels are high. In practice, this means that our knowledge depends very largely on the information gained from the follow-up of the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Japanese cities. The risks calculated from these high-dose short-duration exposures then have to be projected down to the low-dose long-term exposures that apply generally. Recent research using cells in culture has revealed that the relationship between high- and low-dose biological damage may be much more complex than had previously been thought. The aims of this and other projects in the DOE's Low-Dose Program are to gain an understanding of the biological actions of low-dose radiation, ultimately to provide information that will lead to more accurate quantification of low-dose risk. Our project is based on the concept that the processes by which radiation induces cancer start where the individual tracks of radiation impact on cells and tissues. At the dose levels of most low-dose exposures, these events are rare and any individual cells only ''sees'' radiation tracks at intervals averaging from weeks to years apart. This contrasts with the atomic bomb exposures where, on average, each cell was hit by hundreds of tracks instantaneously. We have therefore developed microbeam techniques that enable us ...
Date: December 14, 2002
Creator: Held, Kathy; Prise, Kevin; Michael, Barry & Folkard, Melvyn
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gunite and Associated Tanks Waste Conditioning System: Description and Operational Summary

Description: The purpose of this report is to describe and document the function, operational performance, problems encountered, lessons-learned, and overall assessment of the performance of the waste conditioning system (WCS) in the Gunite{trademark} and Associated Tanks (GAAT) remediation project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The GAAT are located in the main plant area of ORNL in the North and South Tank Farms. These tanks were constructed in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. Each tank in the South Tank Farm (STF) has a 50-ft inside diameter and a capacity of {approx}170,000 gal. Each Gunite tank in the North Tank Farm (NTF) has a 25-ft inside diameter with a capacity of {approx}44,000 gal. The GAAT were designed to receive radioactive and chemical wastes from ORNL processes. The tanks were constructed of Gunite, which is created by pneumatically spraying concrete over a wire mesh. Following construction, the site was backfilled so the domes of the tanks were covered with {approx}6 ft of earth. The STF tanks (W-5, -6, -7, -8, -9, and -10) are set in a 2 x 3 array with an east-west axis. The two GAAT in the NTF are on the north side of Central Avenue, and the STF is across the street. One additional Gunite tank, TH-4, is located {approx}300 ft east of the STF. TH-4 is a smaller, 20-ft inside diameter tank with a capacity of {approx}14,000 gal. Approximately 90% of the sludge inventory was removed from the STF tanks during a sluicing campaign in 1982-84 (Autry et al., 1990). Over 95% of the residual from the original sluicing was removed during the GAAT Remediation Project of 1997-2000. The NTF and STF tanks, as well as tank TH-4 were remediated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) with ...
Date: March 14, 2002
Creator: Emison, JA
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Syndrome Surveillance Using Parametric Space-Time Clustering

Description: As demonstrated by the anthrax attack through the United States mail, people infected by the biological agent itself will give the first indication of a bioterror attack. Thus, a distributed information system that can rapidly and efficiently gather and analyze public health data would aid epidemiologists in detecting and characterizing emerging diseases, including bioterror attacks. We propose using clusters of adverse health events in space and time to detect possible bioterror attacks. Space-time clusters can indicate exposure to infectious diseases or localized exposure to toxins. Most space-time clustering approaches require individual patient data. To protect the patient's privacy, we have extended these approaches to aggregated data and have embedded this extension in a sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) framework. The real-time and sequential nature of health data makes the SPRT an ideal candidate. The result of space-time clustering gives the statistical significance of a cluster at every location in the surveillance area and can be thought of as a ''health-index'' of the people living in this area. As a surrogate to bioterrorism data, we have experimented with two flu data sets. For both databases, we show that space-time clustering can detect a flu epidemic up to 21 to 28 days earlier than a conventional periodic regression technique. We have also tested using simulated anthrax attack data on top of a respiratory illness diagnostic category. Results show we do very well at detecting an attack as early as the second or third day after infected people start becoming severely symptomatic.
Date: November 1, 2002
Creator: KOCH, MARK W.; MCKENNA, SEAN A. & BILISOLY, ROGER L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling Dispersion of Chemical-Biological Agents in Three Dimensional Living Space

Description: This report documents a series of calculations designed to demonstrate Sandia's capability in modeling the dispersal of chemical and biological agents in complex three-dimensional spaces. The transport of particles representing biological agents is modeled in a single room and in several connected rooms. The influence of particle size, particle weight and injection method are studied.
Date: February 1, 2002
Creator: Winters, William S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Innovative Measurement Diagnostics for Analysis of Jet Interactions in Rotating Flowfields

Description: The present document summarizes the experimental efforts of a three-year study funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program of Sandia National Laboratories. The Innovative Diagnostics LDRD project was designed to develop new measurement capabilities to examine the interaction of a propulsive spin jet in a transonic freestream for a model in a wind tunnel. The project motivation was the type of jet/fin interactions commonly occurring during deployment of weapon systems. In particular, the two phenomena of interest were the interaction of the propulsive spin jet with the freestream in the vicinity of the nozzle and the impact of the spin rocket plume and its vortices on the downstream fins. The main thrust of the technical developments was to incorporate small-size, Lagrangian sensors for pressure and roll-rate on a scale model and include data acquisition, transmission, and power circuitry onboard. FY01 was the final year of the three-year LDRD project and the team accomplished much of the project goals including use of micron-scale pressure sensors, an onboard telemetry system for data acquisition and transfer, onboard jet exhaust, and roll-rate measurements. A new wind tunnel model was designed, fabricated, and tested for the program which incorporated the ability to house multiple MEMS-based pressure sensors, interchangeable vehicle fins with pressure instrumentation, an onboard multiple-channel telemetry data package, and a high-pressure jet exhaust simulating a spin rocket motor plume. Experiments were conducted for a variety of MEMS-based pressure sensors to determine performance and sensitivity in order to select pressure transducers for use. The data acquisition and analysis path was most successful by using multiple, 16-channel data processors with telemetry capability to a receiver outside the wind tunnel. The development of the various instrumentation paths led to the fabrication and installation of a new wind tunnel model for baseline non-rotating experiments to validate ...
Date: January 1, 2002
Creator: AMATUCCI, VINCENT A.; BERESH, STEVEN J.; HENFLING, JOHN F.; ERVEN, ROCKY J. & BOURDON, CHRIS J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Post-Closure Inspection Report for Corrective Action Unit 404: Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, Calendar Year 2001

Description: Post-closure monitoring requirements for the Roller Coaster Lagoons and Trench (Corrective Action Unit [CAU] 404) (Figure 1) are described in Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 404. Roller Coaster Sewage Lagoons and North Disposal Trench. Tonopah Test Range. Nevada, report number DOE/NV--187, September 1998. The Closure Report (CR) was submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on September 11, 1998. Permeability results of soils adjacent to the engineered cover and a request for closure of CAU 404 were transmitted to the NDEP on April 29, 1999. The CR (containing the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan) was approved by the NDEP on May 18, 1999. As stated in Section 5.0 of the NDEP-approved CRY post-closure monitoring at CAU 404 consists of the following: (1) Visual site inspections done twice a year to evaluate the condition of the cover and plant development. (2) Verification that the site is secure and condition of the fence and posted warning signs. (3) Notice of any subsidence, erosion, unauthorized excavation, etc., deficiencies that may compromise the integrity of the unit. (4) Remedy of any deficiencies within 90 days of discovery. (5) Preparation and submittal of an annual report. In addition to the above activities, vegetative monitoring of the cover (a plant census) will be done in the first, third and fifth year following revegetation. (Vegetative monitoring will done in fiscal year 2001, and the results reported in the 2002 Post-Closure Inspection Report.) Site inspections were conducted on May 16, 2001, and November 6, 2001. The site inspections were conducted after completion of the revegetation activities (October 30, 1997) and NDEP approval of the CR (May 18, 1999). All site inspections were conducted in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan in the NDEP-approved CR. This report includes copies of inspection checklists, photographs, recommendations, and conclusions. The Post-Closure ...
Date: January 1, 2002
Creator: Campbell, K. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sandia Extended Network: Design Requirements

Description: This report contains the design requirements for creating a limited-access Sandia Extended Network (SXN), which would be used to collaborate with Nuclear Weapons Complex Labs personnel, university collaborators, industry, and others who may not be allowed accounts on the Sandia Restricted Network (SRN). This document contains the design requirements for creating a limited-access Sandia Extended Network (SXN), which would be used by non-Sandians to collaborate with NWC Labs personnel and others who are not allowed accounts on the Sandia Restricted Network (SRN). Its main purpose is to articulate the requirements upon which the design options and hardware costs for the Sandia eXtended Network (SXN) can be based and in turn presented to 8900 and 9300 Management. The requirements are further addressed in reports outlining its security architecture and in the five-volume set of network architecture reports: An Architecture for the Sandia Extended Network: Overview; Detailed Description of the Architecture, Design of the Model, and Balanced Protections; Background of the Architecture and its Relevance to Sandia; Terminology and Concepts Relevant to Networks; and Policy-Based Networks and Information Management.
Date: November 1, 2002
Creator: GOMEZ, MICHAEL D. & GOSSAGE, STEVEN A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Temporary shelter-in-place as protection against a release of airborne hazardous material : report of a literature search.

Description: ''Temporary shelter-in place'' is the combination of prompt shelter-in-place (SIP) to minimize initial exposure to airborne hazardous material, followed by timely action to terminate this protection to minimize exposure to hazardous vapor accumulations in the shelter once the air outside becomes less hazardous than the air inside the shelter. Temporary SIP, if properly executed, is considered to be an effective way to protect populations from hazardous chemical vapors, especially from high concentrations for short periods. This is supported by laboratory and field experiments. The need for timely termination of temporary SIP as protection from infiltrated vapors is an integral component of a temporary SIP strategy. It was from this premise that Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) was asked to develop methodologies for deciding when and how to terminate SIP. These methodologies, in turn, could be the basis for site-specific operational guidelines (e.g., decision matrix, decision-tree, or algorithm) for terminating SIP on each of the eight Army chemical stockpile storage sites, and in the off-post communities surrounding them. This project consists of two tasks. Task 1 was to collect and analyze existing literature that might be relevant to the termination of temporary SIP. This report is the product of Task 1. Task 2, which will begin on 2 February 2001, will use the results of the literature search as the baseline to investigate the concepts associated with temporary SIP, and to develop methodologies for termination of temporary SIP that can be incorporated in site-specific operational guidelines. It is understood that these methods will be consistent with Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) policy that ''the most important objective of the emergency preparedness and implementation process is the avoidance of fatalities to the maximum extent practicable, should an accidental release of chemical agent occur.'' It is also anticipated that these methods will be ...
Date: February 25, 2002
Creator: Yantosik, G. D.; Lerner, K. & Maloney, D. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Software test plan/description/report (STP/STD/STR) for the enhanced logistics intratheater support tool (ELIST) global data segment. Version 8.1.0.0, Database Instance Segment Version 8.1.0.0, ... [elided] and Reference Data Segment Version 8.1.0.0 for Solaris 7

Description: This document is the Software Test Plan/Description/Report (STP/STD/STR) for the DII COE Enhanced Logistics Intratheater Support Tool (ELIST) mission application. It combines in one document the information normally presented separately in a Software Test Plan, a Software Test Description, and a Software Test Report; it also presents this information in one place for all the segments of the ELIST mission application. The primary purpose of this document is to show that ELIST has been tested by the developer and found, by that testing, to install, deinstall, and work properly. The information presented here is detailed enough to allow the reader to repeat the testing independently. The remainder of this document is organized as follows. Section 1.1 identifies the ELIST mission application. Section 2 is the list of all documents referenced in this document. Section 3, the Software Test Plan, outlines the testing methodology and scope--the latter by way of a concise summary of the tests performed. Section 4 presents detailed descriptions of the tests, along with the expected and observed results; that section therefore combines the information normally found in a Software Test Description and a Software Test Report. The remaining small sections present supplementary information. Throughout this document, the phrase ELIST IP refers to the Installation Procedures (IP) for the Enhanced Logistics Intratheater Support Tool (ELIST) Global Data Segment, Database Instance Segment, Database Fill Segment, Database Segment, Database Utility Segment, Software Segment, and Reference Data Segment.
Date: March 6, 2002
Creator: Dritz, K.; Absil-Mills, M. & Jacobs, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurements and Models for Hazardous chemical and Mixed Wastes

Description: Mixed solvent aqueous waste of various chemical compositions constitutes a significant fraction of the total waste produced by industry in the United States. Not only does the chemical process industry create large quantities of aqueous waste, but the majority of the waste inventory at the DOE sites previously used for nuclear weapons production is mixed solvent aqueous waste. In addition, large quantities of waste are expected to be generated in the clean-up of those sites. In order to effectively treat, safely handle, and properly dispose of these wastes, accurate and comprehensive knowledge of basic thermophysical properties is essential. The goal of this work is to develop a phase equilibrium model for mixed solvent aqueous solutions containing salts. An equation of state was sought for these mixtures that (a) would require a minimum of adjustable parameters and (b) could be obtained from a available data or data that were easily measured. A model was developed to predict vapor composition and pressure given the liquid composition and temperature. It is based on the Peng-Robinson equation of state, adapted to include non-volatile and salt components. The model itself is capable of predicting the vapor-liquid equilibria of a wide variety of systems composed of water, organic solvents, salts, nonvolatile solutes, and acids or bases. The representative system o water + acetone + 2-propanol + NaNo3 was selected to test and verify the model. Vapor-liquid equilibrium and phase density measurements were performed for this system and its constituent binaries.
Date: August 21, 2002
Creator: Watts, Laurel A.; Holcomb, Cynthia D.; Outcalt, Stephanie L.; Louie, Beverly; Mullins, Michael E. & Rogers, Tony N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department