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Operational Guideline: Tenax TA{sup (R)} Collection and In-Injection Port Thermal Desorption Analysis of Trace Levels of Organic Explosive Vapors

Description: This document contains operational guidelines for an organic explosives vapor sampling and analysis method developed in the Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding provided by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. This document is written in a format resembling that of a standard operating procedure (SOP); however, it is intended only as an operational guideline for those wishing to implement the method.
Date: September 6, 2001
Creator: Sigman, M.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

River Protection Project (RPP) Project Management Plan

Description: The Office of River Protection (ORP) Project Management Plan (PMP) for the River Protection Project (RPP) describes the process for developing and operating a Waste Treatment Complex (WTC) to clean up Hanford Site tank waste. The Plan describes the scope of the project, the institutional setting within which the project must be completed, and the management processes and structure planned for implementation. The Plan is written from the perspective of the ORP as the taxpayers' representative. The Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State, has one of the largest concentrations of radioactive waste in the world, as a result of producing plutonium for national defense for more than 40 years. Approximately 53 million gallons of waste stored in 177 aging underground tanks represent major environmental, social, and political challenges for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These challenges require numerous interfaces with state and federal environmental officials, Tribal Nations, stakeholders, Congress, and the US Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ). The cleanup of the Site's tank waste is a national issue with the potential for environmental and economic impacts to the region and the nation.
Date: March 7, 2001
Creator: NAVARRO, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Radioactive Solid Waste Storage and Disposal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Description and Safety Analysis

Description: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a principle Department of Energy (DOE) Research Institution operated by the Union Carbide Corporation - Nuclear Division (UCC-ND) under direction of the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (DOE-ORO). The Laboratory was established in east Tennessee, near what is now the city of Oak Ridge, in the mid 1940s as a part of the World War II effort to develop a nuclear weapon. Since its inception, disposal of radioactively contaminated materials, both solid and liquid, has been an integral part of Laboratory operations. The purpose of this document is to provide a detailed description of the ORNL Solid Waste Storage Areas, to describe the practice and procedure of their operation, and to address the health and safety impacts and concerns of that operation.
Date: January 30, 2001
Creator: Bates, L.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

INSENSITIVE HIGH-NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

Description: The conventional approach to developing energetic molecules is to chemically place one or more nitro groups onto a carbon skeleton, which is why the term ''nitration'' is synonymous to explosives preparation. The nitro group carries the oxygen that reacts with the skeletal carbon and hydrogen fuels, which in turn produces the heat and gaseous reaction products necessary for driving an explosive shock. These nitro-containing energetic molecules typically have heats of formation near zero and therefore most of the released energy is derived from the combustion process. Our investigation of the tetrazine, furazan and tetrazole ring systems has offered a different approach to explosives development, where a significant amount of the chemical potential energy is derived from their large positive heats of formation. Because these compounds often contain a large percentage of nitrogen atoms, they are usually regarded as high-nitrogen fuels or explosives. A general artifact of these high-nitrogen compounds is that they are less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine, several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. Some of the first compounds are 3,6-diamino-s-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide (LAX-112) and 3,6-dihydrazino-s-tetrazine (DHT). LAX-112 was once extensively studied as an insensitive explosive by Los Alamos; DHT is an example of a high-nitrogen explosive that relies entirely on its heat of formation for sustaining a detonation. Recent synthesis efforts have yielded an azo-s-tetrazine, 3,3'-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, which has a very high positive heat of formation. The compounds, 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB--the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is ...
Date: March 1, 2001
Creator: CHAVEZ, D. & AL, ET
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

''Smart Gun'' Technology Update

Description: This report is an update to previous ''smart gun'' work and the corresponding report that were completed in 1996. It incorporates some new terminology and expanded definitions. This effort is the product of an open source look at what has happened to the ''smart gun'' technology landscape since the 1996 report was published.
Date: November 1, 2001
Creator: WIRSBINSKI, JOHN W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Distributed Sensor Particles for Remote Fluorescence Detection of Trace Analytes: UXO/CW

Description: This report summarizes the development of sensor particles for remote detection of trace chemical analytes over broad areas, e.g residual trinitrotoluene from buried landmines or other unexploded ordnance (UXO). We also describe the potential of the sensor particle approach for the detection of chemical warfare (CW) agents. The primary goal of this work has been the development of sensor particles that incorporate sample preconcentration, analyte molecular recognition, chemical signal amplification, and fluorescence signal transduction within a ''grain of sand''. Two approaches for particle-based chemical-to-fluorescence signal transduction are described: (1) enzyme-amplified immunoassays using biocompatible inorganic encapsulants, and (2) oxidative quenching of a unique fluorescent polymer by TNT.
Date: November 1, 2001
Creator: SINGH, ANUP K.; GUPTA, ALOK; MULCHANDANI, ASHOK; CHEN, WILFRED; BHATIA, RIMPLE B.; SCHOENIGER, JOSEPH S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lessons Learned from JTA Tester Safety Studies

Description: EP401575, Issue C, calls out a requirement to perform safety studies for testers that are used to accept Joint Test Assembly (JTA) product at Pantex (Reference 1). The underlying motivation is to ensure that personnel hazards due to inadvertent initiation of electro-explosive devices (EEDs) during JTA testing are understood and minimized. Studies have been performed on the B61-7/11 JTA, B61-3/4/10 JTA, B83 JTA, and W76 Type 2F testers at Pantex (References 2-5). Each of these studies includes an examination of the relevant Pantex tester as well as the instrumentation and War Reserve (WR) hardware. In performing these analyses, several themes have emerged that could be useful for the Phase 6.3 design efforts for the weapons, the associated instrumentation, and the JTA testers. This report summarizes the lessons learned from these studies. Note that in some cases, the recommendations provided below to enhance safety during JTA testing operations (e.g., adding isolation resistors in the monitoring lines) may result in a reliability degradation or other surety impact. Thus it is important to consider these lessons learned in the context of the overall design and to make tradeoffs in light of the integrated surety objectives. The lessons learned are listed in five different categories, summarized as: (1) Instrumentation considerations; (2) WR design considerations; (3) Tester considerations; (4) Administrative procedures during JTA assembly; and (5) Administrative procedures prior to and during JTA testing. The first three focus on minimizing the probability of inadvertent application of power to EED initiation lines due to component, connector, and assembly failures. The last two describe procedural steps that can be taken at Pantex to either minimize the risk (e.g., by ensuring that tester power supplies cannot supply excessive power to the unit under test) or to mitigate the consequences of unexpected EED initiation (e.g., by instructing test operators ...
Date: May 1, 2001
Creator: Bierbaum, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seismic Performance Requirements for WETF

Description: This report develops recommendations for requirements on the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) performance during seismic events. These recommendations are based on fragility estimates of WETF structures, systems, and components that were developed by LANL experts during facility walkdowns. They follow DOE guidance as set forth in standards DOE-STD-1021-93, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components'' and DOE-STD-1020-94, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities''. Major recommendations are that WETF institute a stringent combustible loading control program and that additional seismic bracing and anchoring be provided for gloveboxes and heavy equipment.
Date: January 1, 2001
Creator: Jordan, Hans
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Course of Action Analysis within an Effects-Based Operational Context

Description: This article summarizes information related to the automated course of action (COA) development effort. The information contained in this document puts the COA effort into an operational perspective that addresses command and control theory, as well as touching on the military planning concept known as effects-based operations. The sections relating to the COA effort detail the rationale behind the functional models developed and identify technologies that could support the process functions. The functional models include a section related to adversarial modeling, which adds a dynamic to the COA process that is missing in current combat simulations. The information contained in this article lays the foundation for building a unique analytic capability.
Date: November 1, 2001
Creator: SENGLAUB, MICHAEL E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Groundwater Protection Program Management Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: This document presents the Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) management plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12). The Y-12 GWPP functions as the primary point-of-contact for groundwater-related issues at Y-12, provides stewardship of the extensive network of groundwater monitoring wells at Y-12, and serves as a resource for technical expertise, support, and historical data for groundwater-related activities at Y-12. These organizational functions each serve the primary programmatic purpose of the GWPP, which is to ensure that groundwater monitoring activities within areas under Y-12 administrative control provide representative data in compliance with the multiple purposes of applicable state and federal regulations, DOE orders, and the corporate policies of BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (hereafter referenced as BWXT Y-12), the Y-12 management and operations (M and O) subcontractor for DOE.
Date: June 1, 2001
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Personnel Security Assurance Program: Profile From 1992 through 2000

Description: The Personnel Security Assurance Program (PSAP) was initiated to ensure that individuals employed in certain positions in the Department of Energy (DOE) meet and maintain high standards of reliability and trustworthiness. The positions included in the PSAP fall into three groups: (1) positions that provide direct access to, or have direct responsibility for transporting, category I quantities of special nuclear material; (2) positions that afford unescorted access to the control areas of nuclear material production reactors; and (3) positions having the potential for causing unacceptable damage to national security. Although individuals in the PSAP are subject to the customary access authorization criteria, the program establishes a more intensive and frequent review process for maintaining PSAP access authorizations. This report presents information from 1992 through 2000, both overall and stratified by DOE site, on individuals removed from the PSAP. Only a small percentage of removals (generally less than 5% per year) were caused by actions on the part of program participants that brought into question their loyalty, trustworthiness, or reliability. Most removals were due to administrative reasons, such as employees retiring, paperwork delays, or positions being reclassified due to change in scope. In this report the term ''reliability issues'' will be used for causes of removal that are based on derogatory issues delineated in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 710 (10 CFR, Part 710), and ''non-reliability issues'' will refer to all other sources for removal of employees from PSAP.
Date: May 1, 2001
Creator: Studies, Center for Human Reliability
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THE FISSILE MATERIAL TRANSPARENCY TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION (FMTTD)

Description: The United States Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency Cooperative Threat Reduction program is supporting the construction of a fissile material storage facility at Mayak in the Russian Federation. Up to 34 tons of weapon-grade plutonium will be stored in the facility to await disposition. In order to meet arms control and nonproliferation objectives, the U.S. Congress has requested assurances that the nuclear material stored at the Mayak facility is derived from dismantled nuclear weapons. The usual approach to identify the origin or state of radioactive materials is to measure the intensity and energy of neutron and gamma radiation emitted. However, the Russian Federation considers such details as isotopic composition and mass to be classified. The solution arrived at by a DOE multilaboratory team is to place the radioactive specimen, the gamma and neutron counters, and all the computational equipment behind an information barrier. In the Fissile Materials Transparency Technology Demonstration (FMTD), this equipment was configured and programmed to measure the following six attributes: isotopic ratio, threshold mass, absence of oxide, presence of plutonium, age, and symmetry. On August 16, 2000, at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a delegation of Russian officials observed the successful demonstration of this new technology (called an Attribute Measurement System with Information Barrier, or AMS/IB). The scientists were able to demonstrate without releasing classified information that the nuclear material sample being tested (a nuclear weapon pit) had the declared weapon-grade plutonium characteristics. Once fully developed, AMS/IB technology will protect sensitive information while providing the United States increased confidence that the mandated Russian fissile materials have been stored. Attribute measurement systems can play a role in a number of U.S.-Russian nuclear security regimes such as the Trilateral Initiative, the Plutonium Production Reactor Agreement, and future strategic arms agreements. This paper discusses the details of this new ...
Date: June 1, 2001
Creator: AVENS, L. R.; DOYLE, J. E. & MULLEN, M. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Work Plan Mud Pit Release Sites, Amchitka Island, Alaska

Description: This Work Plan describes the approach that will be used to conduct human health and ecological risk assessments for Amchitka Island, Alaska, which was utilized as an underground nuclear test site between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U.S. Department of Energy) conducted two nuclear tests (known as Long Shot and Milrow) and assisted the U.S. Department of Defense with a third test (known as Cannikin). Amchitka Island is approximately 42 miles long and located 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, in the western end of the Aleutian Island archipelago in a group of islands known as the Rat Islands. Historically including deep drilling operations required large volumes of drilling mud, a considerable amount of which was left on the island in exposed mud pits after testing was completed. Therefore, there is a need for drilling mud pit remediation and risk assessment of historical mud pit releases. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the constituents in soil, surface water, and sediment at these former testing sites. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate what further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of these three sites that will protect both human health and the environment. Suspected compounds of potential ecological concern for investigative analysis at these sites include diesel-range organics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, volatile organic compounds, and chromium. The results of these characterizations and risk assessments will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-sit ...
Date: March 12, 2001
Creator: United States. Department of Energy. Nevada Operations Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Generalized Security Framework

Description: The Generalized Security Framework (GSF) consists of a set of libraries, classes, and tools that provide developers with the ability to easily secure distributed applications and collaborative environments. The GSF uses and enhances the Generic Security Services API (GSSAPI) to provide authentication, authorization, data protection, delegation, and auditing. It currently works with either DCE or Kerberos as the underlying security mechanism, and it has been designed so support for PKI can be easily added in the future. DCE/Kerberos is a scaleable, mature, robust security infrastructure embraced and accredited throughout the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) for a secure collaborative modeling and simulation environment. The goal of the GSF is to provide a common security foundation that can be applied and extended to create secure distributed applications, independent of the communications protocol. The GSF provides a number of extensions that embed GSF security in specific remote communication APIs, such as Java sockets and Java RMI. The extensions have been designed and implemented in such a manner as to require minimum changes to application code in order to move from an unsecure application to a secure application. The advantage of this approach is that security can be enforced reliably and consistently since very little is required of the application developer. In this paper, the authors describe the goals, design, and implementation of the Generalized Security Framework.
Date: June 1, 2001
Creator: Detry, Richard J.; Kleban, Stephen D. & Moore, Patrick C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of the Radiological Survey of the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant, Middletown, Iowa

Description: At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted an indoor radiological survey of property at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant (IAAAP), Middletown, Iowa in June 2000. The purpose of the survey was to determine if radioactive residuals resulting from previous Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) activities were present inside selected Line 1 buildings at the IAAAP and conduct sampling in those areas of previous AEC operations that utilized radioactive components at some point during the manufacturing process, in order to evaluate any possible immediate health hazards and to collect sufficient information to determine the next type of survey. The AEC occupied portions of IAAAP from 1947 to 1975 to assemble nuclear weapons. The surveyed areas were identified through interviews with current and former IAAAP employees who had worked at the plant during AEC's tenure, and from AEC records.
Date: July 17, 2001
Creator: Murray, M.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

De-Alerting and De-Activating Strategic Nuclear Weapons

Description: Despite the end of the Cold War, the US and Russia continue to maintain their ICBMs and many SLBMs in a highly alerted state--they are technically prepared to launch the missiles within minutes of a command decision to do so. Some analysts argue that, particularly in light of the distressed condition of the Russian military, these high alert conditions are tantamount to standing on the edge of a nuclear cliff from which we should now step back. They have proposed various bilateral ''de-alerting'' measures, to be taken prior to and outside the context of the formal strategic arms reduction treaty (START) process. This paper identifies several criteria for a stable de-alerting regime, but fails to find de-alerting measures that convincingly satisfy the criteria. However, some de-alerting measures have promise as de-activation measures for systems due for elimination under the START II and prospective START III treaties. Moreover, once these systems are deactivated, a considerable part of the perceived need to keep nuclear forces on high alert as a survivability hedge will be reduced. At the same time, the U.S. and Russia could consider building on their earlier cooperative actions to reduce the risk of inadvertent nuclear war by enhancing their communications links and possibly joining in efforts to improve early warning systems.
Date: April 1, 2001
Creator: Karas, Thomas H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report of Official Foreign Travel to Germany, May 16-June 1, 2001

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) and associated agencies have moved rapidly toward electronic production, management, and dissemination of scientific and technical information. The World-Wide Web (WWW) has become a primary means of information dissemination. Electronic commerce (EC) is becoming the preferred means of procurement. DOE, like other government agencies, depends on and encourages the use of international standards in data communications. Like most government agencies, DOE has expressed a preference for openly developed standards over proprietary designs promoted as ''standards'' by vendors. In particular, there is a preference for standards developed by organizations such as the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) that use open, public processes to develop their standards. Among the most widely adopted international standards is the Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML, ISO 8879:1986, FIPS 152), to which DOE long ago made a commitment. Besides the official commitment, which has resulted in several specialized projects, DOE makes heavy use of coding derived from SGML: Most documents on the WWW are coded in HTML (Hypertext Markup Language), which is an application of SGML. The World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C), with the backing of major software houses like Adobe, IBM, Microsoft, Netscape, Oracle, and Sun, is promoting XML (eXtensible Markup Language), a class of SGML applications, for the future of the WWW and the basis for EC. In support of DOE's use of these standards, I have served since 1985 as Chairman of the international committee responsible for SGML and related standards, ISO/IEC JTC1/SC34 (SC34) and its predecessor organizations. During my May 2001 trip, I chaired the spring 2001 meeting of SC34 in Berlin, Germany. I also attended XML Europe 2001, a major conference on the use of SGML and XML sponsored by the Graphic Communications Association (GCA), and chaired a meeting of the ...
Date: June 18, 2001
Creator: Mason, J. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SOFTWARE TOOLS THAT ADDRESS HAZARDOUS MATERIAL ISSUES DURING NUCLEAR FACILITY D and D

Description: The 49-year-old Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility is where analytical chemistry and metallurgical studies on samples of plutonium and nuclear materials are conduct in support of the Department of Energy's nuclear weapons program. The CMR Facility is expected to be decontaminated and decommissioned (D and D) over the next ten to twenty years. Over the decades, several hazardous material issues have developed that need to be address. Unstable chemicals must be properly reassigned or disposed of from the workspace during D and D operation. Materials that have critical effects that are primarily chronic in nature, carcinogens, reproductive toxin, and materials that exhibit high chronic toxicity, have unique decontamination requirements, including the decontrolling of areas where these chemicals were used. Certain types of equipment and materials that contain mercury, asbestos, lead, and polychlorinated biphenyls have special provisions that must be addressed. Utilization of commercially available software programs for addressing hazardous material issues during D and D operations such as legacy chemicals and documentation are presented. These user-friendly programs eliminate part of the tediousness associated with the complex requirements of legacy hazardous materials. A key element of this approach is having a program that inventories and tracks all hazardous materials. Without an inventory of chemicals stored in a particular location, many important questions pertinent to D and D operations can be difficult to answer. On the other hand, a well-managed inventory system can address unstable and highly toxic chemicals and hazardous material records concerns before they become an issue. Tapping into the institutional database provides a way to take advantage of the combined expertise of the institution in managing a cost effective D and D program as well as adding a quality assurance element to the program. Using laboratory requirements as a logic flow diagram, quality and cost effective methods are ...
Date: March 1, 2001
Creator: COURNOYER, M. & GRUNDEMANN, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 405: Area 3 Septic Systems, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada(April 2001, Rev. 0) with Record of Technical Change No. 1

Description: This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 405, Area 3 Septic Systems, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 405 consists of Corrective Action Sites 03-05-002-SW03, 03-05-002-SW04, and 03-05-002-SW07 (also collectively known as: Septic Waste Systems [SWSs] 3, 4, and 7). Located in Area 3 in the northwest section of the TTR, approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, this location was historically (between 1960 and 1990) used as a research facility with the mission to perform defense-related projects, and whose operations generated sanitary and industrial wastewaters potentially contaminated with COPCs and disposed of in septic tanks and leachfields. Though Septic Waste Systems 3, 4, and 7 were origin ally constructed to receive sanitary sewage, they may have inadvertently received effluent containing potentially hazardous and radiological constituents containing acetone, benzene, ethylbenzene, 4-methyl-2-pentanone, toluene, xylenes, volatile organic compound constituents, phenols, arsenic, barium, lead, mercury, hydrocarbons of oil and grease, and uranium-234, -235, and -238. The Area 3 septic systems were documented in a DOE/NV 1996 report as being included in the septic tank abandonment program conducted by Sandia National Laboratories in 1993; however, this program was not completed and the possibility exists that some of the Area 3 septic tanks may not have been abandoned. Even though all of the SWSs addressed in this CAIP are inactive, geophysical surveys conducted in 1993 were generally inconclusive and did not provide useful data for the purposes of this investigation. The scope of this current investigation, therefore, will be to determine the existence of the identified CO PCs and excavation will be the primary investigation method employed for ...
Date: April 26, 2001
Creator: /NV, DOE
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, June 2001)

Description: This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 409: Other Waste Sites, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located near Area 3 on the TTR approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, CAU 409 is comprised of three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS RG-24-001-RGCR, Battery Dump Site; CAS TA-53-001-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit (referred to as Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.1); CAS TA-53-002-TAB2, Septic Sludge Disposal Pit (referred to as Septic Sludge Disposal Pit No.2). This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office's (NNSA/NV's) recommendation that no corrective action is deemed necessary for CAU 409. The CADD/CR have been combined into one report based on sample data collected during the field investigation performed in November 2000. Analysis of the data generated from these investigation activities indicates preliminary action levels were not exceeded for total volatile organic compounds, Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, TCLP semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (except arsenic), TCLP RCRA metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, total petroleum hydrocarbons as gasoline- and diesel-range organics, isotopic uranium, and gamma-emitting radionuclides (except thorium-234) for any of the soil samples collected. Concentrations of arsenic were detected above the preliminary action level in all samples; however, the concentrations are considered representative of ambient conditions at the site. Thorium-234 was tentatively identified in one sample; however, the concentration is considered no greater than background. The NNSA/NV's final determination is that CAU 409 shows no evidence of soil contamination at any of the associated CASs; therefore, the recommendation for no corrective action is justified.
Date: June 12, 2001
Creator: United States. Department of Energy. Nevada Operations Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Toward the Computational Representation of Individual Cultural, Cognitive, and Physiological State: The Sensor Shooter Simulation

Description: This report documents an exploratory FY 00 LDRD project that sought to demonstrate the first steps toward a realistic computational representation of the variability encountered in individual human behavior. Realism, as conceptualized in this project, required that the human representation address the underlying psychological, cultural, physiological, and environmental stressors. The present report outlines the researchers' approach to representing cognitive, cultural, and physiological variability of an individual in an ambiguous situation while faced with a high-consequence decision that would greatly impact subsequent events. The present project was framed around a sensor-shooter scenario as a soldier interacts with an unexpected target (two young Iraqi girls). A software model of the ''Sensor Shooter'' scenario from Desert Storm was developed in which the framework consisted of a computational instantiation of Recognition Primed Decision Making in the context of a Naturalistic Decision Making model [1]. Recognition Primed Decision Making was augmented with an underlying foundation based on our current understanding of human neurophysiology and its relationship to human cognitive processes. While the Gulf War scenario that constitutes the framework for the Sensor Shooter prototype is highly specific, the human decision architecture and the subsequent simulation are applicable to other problems similar in concept, intensity, and degree of uncertainty. The goal was to provide initial steps toward a computational representation of human variability in cultural, cognitive, and physiological state in order to attain a better understanding of the full depth of human decision-making processes in the context of ambiguity, novelty, and heightened arousal.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: RAYBOURN,ELAINE M. & FORSYTHE,JAMES C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of Near-field and Far-field Air Monitoring of Plutonium-contaminated Soils from the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

Description: Operation Roller Coaster, a series of nuclear material dispersal experiments, resulted in three areas (Clean Slates 1, 2, and 3) of widespread surface soil plutonium (Pu) contamination on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), located 225 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The State's Division of Environmental Protection raised concerns that dispersal of airborne Pu particles from the sites could result in undetected deposition further downwind that the background monitoring stations. Air monitoring data from different distances from the Clean Slate sites but during the same period of time were compared. From the available data, there is no indication that airborne PM10 particles are being transported to the farther distance,however, the data are statistically insufficient to conclude whether there is a difference in transport of respirable Pu particles to the closer verses the farther sites from the Clean Slate sites.
Date: May 1, 2001
Creator: Bowen, John L. & Shafer, David S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department