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Closure report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations steam-cleaning discharge area, Nevada Test Site

Description: This Closure Report (CR) provides documentation of the completed corrective action at the Area 12 Fleet Operations site located in the southeast portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Field work was performed in July 1997 as outlined in the Corrective Action Plan (CAP). The CAP was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in June 1997. This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) Number 12-19-01 and is the only CAS in Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. The former Area 12 Fleet Operations Building 12-16 functioned as a maintenance facility for light- and heavy-duty vehicles from approximately 1965 to January 1993. Services performed at the site included steam-cleaning, tire service, and preventative maintenance on vehicles and equipment. Past activities impacted the former steam-cleaning discharge area with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as oil.
Date: December 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coupled explosive/structure computational techniques at Sandia National Laboratories

Description: Simulation of the effects of explosives on structures is a challenge because the explosive response can best be simulated using Eulerian computational techniques and structural behavior is best modeled using Lagrangian methods. Due to the different methodology of the two computational techniques and code architecture requirements, they are usually implemented in different computer programs. Explosive and structure modeling in two different codes make it difficult or next to impossible to do coupled explosive/structure interaction simulations. Sandia National Laboratories has developed two techniques for solving this problem. The first is called Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), a relatively new gridless method comparable to Eulerian, that is especially suited for treating liquids and gases such as those produced by an explosive. The SPH capability has been fully implemented into the transient dynamics finite element (Lagrangian) codes PRONTO-2D and -3D. A PRONTO-3D/SPH simulation of the effect of a blast on a protective-wall barrier is presented in this paper. The second technique employed at Sandia uses a new code called Zapotec that combines the 3-D Eulerian code CTH and the Lagrangian code PRONTO-3D with minimal changes to either code. CTH and PRONTO-3D are currently executing on the Sandia Terraflops machine (9000 Pentium Pro processors). Eulerian simulations with 100 million cells have been completed on the current configuration of the machine (4500 Pentium Pro processors). The CTH and PRONTO-3D combination will soon be executing in a coupled fashion on this machine.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Preece, D.S.; Attaway, S.W. & Swegle, J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Polyplanar optic display

Description: The Polyplanar Optical Display (POD) is a unique display screen which can be used with any projection source. This display screen is 2 inches thick and has a matte black face which allows for high contrast images. The prototype being developed is a form, fit and functional replacement display for the B-52 aircraft which uses a monochrome ten-inch display. The new display uses a 100 milliwatt green solid state laser (532 nm) as its optical source. In order to produce real-time video, the laser light is being modulated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP{trademark}) chip manufactured by Texas Instruments, Inc. A variable astigmatic focusing system is used to produce a stigmatic image on the viewing face of the POD. In addition to the optical design, the authors discuss the electronic interfacing to the DLP{trademark} chip, the opto-mechanical design and viewing angle characteristics.
Date: July 1, 1997
Creator: Veligdan, J.; Biscardi, C.; Brewster, C.; DeSanto, L. & Beiser, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laser deflection of space objects -- An overview

Description: Lasers provide the two major attributes required for effective deflection of space objects: agility and efficiency. Lasers act instantaneously over long distances with little losses, but deliver energy at modest power levels. Material interceptors provide large impulses, but deliver only a fraction of the mass launched into space at low speeds. The two deflection concepts are compared, as are some important additional applications.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Canavan, G. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimates of the temperature of impact craters

Description: Scaling results for the growth and size of impact craters are used to estimate the temperatures and signals in impacts. The flow of plasma from the impactor entrance hole affords an opportunity to observe the thermodynamic state of the luminous material and infer the material properties of the target material. The brightness temperature can be determined from the optical thickness of the radiating layer, which can be solved using two-dimensional similarity solutions discussed earlier. The solutions are not overly sensitive to physical parameters. The peak signals should be readily observable from hundreds of kilometers.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Canavan, G. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modular weapon control unit

Description: The goal of the Modular Weapon Control Unit (MWCU) program was to design and develop a reconfigurable weapon controller (programmer/sequencer) that can be adapted to different weapon systems based on the particular requirements for that system. Programmers from previous systems are conceptually the same and perform similar tasks. Because of this commonality and the amount of re-engineering necessary with the advent of every new design, the idea of a modular, adaptable system has emerged. Also, the controller can be used in more than one application for a specific weapon system. Functionality has been divided into a Processor Module (PM) and an Input/Output Module (IOM). The PM will handle all operations that require calculations, memory, and timing. The IOM will handle interfaces to the rest of the system, input level shifting, output drive capability, and detection of interrupt conditions. Configuration flexibility is achieved in two ways. First, the operation of the PM is determined by a surface mount Read-Only Memory (ROM). Other surface-mount components can be added or neglected as necessary for functionality. Second, IOMs consist of configurable input buffers, configurable output drivers, and configurable interrupt generation. Further, these modules can be added singly or in groups to a Processor Module to achieve the required I/O configuration. The culmination of this LDRD was the building of both Processor Module and Input/Output Module. The MWCU was chosen as a test system to evaluate Low-Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) technology, desirable for high component density and good thermal characteristics.
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Boccabella, M.F. & McGovney, G.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Brittle damage models in DYNA2D

Description: DYNA2D is an explicit Lagrangian finite element code used to model dynamic events where stress wave interactions influence the overall response of the system. DYNA2D is often used to model penetration problems involving ductile-to-ductile impacts; however, with the advent of the use of ceramics in the armor-anti-armor community and the need to model damage to laser optics components, good brittle damage models are now needed in DYNA2D. This report will detail the implementation of four brittle damage models in DYNA2D, three scalar damage models and one tensor damage model. These new brittle damage models are then used to predict experimental results from three distinctly different glass damage problems.
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Faux, D.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Shock wave structure in heterogeneous reactive media

Description: Continuum mixture theory and mesoscale modeling are applied to describe the behavior of shock-loaded heterogeneous media. One-dimensional simulations of gas-gun experiments demonstrate that the wave features are well described by mixture theory, including reflected wave behavior and conditions where significant reaction is initiated. Detailed wave fields are resolved in numerical simulations of impact on a lattice of discrete explosive {open_quotes}crystals{close_quotes}. It is shown that rapid distortion first occurs at material contact points; the nature of the dispersive fields includes large amplitude fluctuations of stress over several particle pathlengths. Localization of energy causes {open_quotes}hot-spots{close_quotes} due to shock focusing and plastic work as material flows into interstitial regions.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Baer, M.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Automated ammunition logistics for the Crusader program

Description: The US Army`s next generation artillery system is called the Crusader. A self-propelled howitzer and a resupply vehicle constitute the Crusader system, which will be designed for improved mobility, increased firepower, and greater survivability than current generation vehicles. The Army`s Project Manager, Crusader, gave Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the task of developing and demonstrating a concept for the resupply vehicle. The resupply vehicle is intended to sustain the howitzer with ammunition and fuel and will significantly increase capabilities over those of current resupply vehicles. Ammunition is currently processed and transferred almost entirely by hand. ORNL identified and evaluated various concepts for automated upload, processing, storage, docking and delivery. Each of the critical technologies was then developed separately and demonstrated on discrete test platforms. An integrated technology demonstrator, incorporating each of the individual technology components to realistically simulate performance of the selected vehicle concept, was developed and successfully demonstrated for the Army.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Speaks, D.M.; Kring, C.T.; Lloyd, P.D.; Ray, T.L. & Jatko, W.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MC4523 Sealed Cap: Component & characteristics development report

Description: The MC4523 Sealed Cap is a WW42C1 Percussion Primer that is pressed into a steel cylinder. Hermaticity of the input end is then provided by welding a thin steel closure disk on the input end of the MC4523. Thus, the user is provided with a component that is prequalified in terms of ignition sensitivity and hermeticity. The first customer is the Thermal Battery Department (1522). The MC4523 will be used on the MC2736A Thermal Battery which in turn will be used on the W78 JTA. Attachment of the MC4523 to the battery is with a laser weld. Combined test results of four production lots at a commercial supplier (PPI, TMS, WR1, and WR2) show an all-fire ignition sensitivity (.999 @ 50%) of approximately 60 millijoules of mechanical energy with a 2.2 gram firing pin. The firing pin had an impact tip with a radius of 0.020 inch. This firing pin is like that to be used in the W78 JTA application. Approximately 112 millijoules of mechanical energy will be supplied in the application, thus the design margin is more than adequate.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Begeal, D.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A comparative assessment of the economics of plutonium disposition

Description: The US Department of Energy office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD) has been evaluating three technologies for the disposition of approximately 50 metric tons of surplus plutonium from defense-related programs: reactors, immobilization, and deep boreholes. As part of the process supporting an early CY 1997 Record of Decision (ROD), a comprehensive assessment of technical viability, cost, and schedule has been conducted by DOE/MD and its national laboratory contractors. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has managed and coordinated the life-cycle cost (LCC) assessment effort for this program. This paper discusses the economic analysis methodology and the results prior to ROD. A secondary intent of the paper is to discuss major technical and economic issues that impact cost and schedule. To evaluate the economics of these technologies on an equitable basis, a set of cost-estimating guidelines and a common cost-estimating format were utilized by all three technology teams. This paper also includes the major economic analysis assumptions and the comparative constant-dollar and discounted-dollar LCCs.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Williams, K.A.; Miller, J.W. & Reid, R.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act industrial site environmental restoration site characterization plan: Area 23, Building 650 Leachfield

Description: This plan presents the strategy for the characterization of Corrective Action Unit 94, Area 23, Building 650 Leachfield. It is a land disposal unit, located southeast of Building 650, that was in operation from 1965 to October 1992, with an estimated annual discharge rate of less than 984 liters from designated sinks, floor drains, and emergency decontamination showers in Building 650. The objectives of the planned activities are to: obtain sufficient sample analytical data from which further assessment, remediation, and/or closure strategies may be developed for the site: and obtain sufficient sample analytical data for management of investigation-derived waste (IDW). All references to regulations in this plan are to the versions of the regulations that are current at the time of publication of this plan. The scope of the characterization will include subsurface soil boring (i.e., drilling), in situ sampling of the soil within subsurface soil borings, and sample analysis for both site characterization and waste management purposes.
Date: March 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mobile, scanning x-ray source for mine detection using backscattered x-rays

Description: A continuously operating, scanning x-ray machine is being developed for landmine detection using backscattered x-rays. The source operates at 130 kV and 650 mA. The x-rays are formed by electrons striking a high Z target. Target shape is an approximate 5 cm wide by 210 cm long racetrack. The electron beam is scanned across this target with electromagnets. There are 105, 1-cm by 1-cm collimators in each leg of the racetrack for a total of 210 collimators. The source is moved in the forward direction(the direction perpendicular to the 210-cm dimension) at 3 mi/h. The forward velocity and collimator spacing are such that a grid of collimated x-rays are projected at normal incidence to the soil. The spacing between the collimators and the ground results in a 2-cm by 2-cm x-ray pixel on the ground. A unique detector arrangement of collimated and uncollimated detectors allows surface features to be recognized and removed, leaving an image of a buried landmine. Another detector monitors the uncollimated x-ray output and is used to normalize the source output. The mine detector is being prepared for an Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD). The ATD is scheduled for midyear of 1998. The results of the source performance in pre ATD tests will be presented.
Date: April 1997
Creator: Shope, S.; Lockwood, G.; Bishop, L.; Selph, M.; Jojola, J.; Wavrik, R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Statistical modeling of corrosion-induced wirebond failure

Description: This paper describes the initial results of one portion of a project to develop effective analytical tools for predicting the effect of atmospheric corrosion on the reliability of electronic devices. The specific objectives of this work were to experimentally characterize the atmospheric corrosion of aluminum-gold wirebonds and to develop a statistical-based model that describes the effect of the resulting stochastic process on the reliability of a selected electronic assembly. The experimental characterization included an attempt at accelerated aging. Modeling involved: (1) the development and validation of empirical models that describe the effects of environmental parameters on corrosion rate, and (2) the formulation and validation of a reliability-prediction model using the accelerated aging data and long-term field information as it becomes available. A preliminary assessment of the effect of three environmental factors on wirebond failure rate was performed and an empirical rate model defined. Subsequently, a statistical treatment of the rate information was used in a Monte Carlo simulation technique to determine the service life of a hypothetical electronic assembly. This work demonstrated that stochastic, corrosion-induced degradation can be successfully incorporated in classical techniques to analyze component reliability. 19 figs., 3 tabs.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Sorensen, N.R. & Braithwaite, J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Closure report for CAU No. 450: Historical UST release sites, Nevada Test Site. Volume 1

Description: This report addresses the closure of 11 historical underground storage tank (UST) release sites within various areas of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The closure of each hydrocarbon release has not been documented, therefore, this report addresses the remedial activities completed for each release site. The hydrocarbon release associated with each tank site within CAU 450 was remediated by excavating the impacted soil. Clean closure of the release was verified through soil sample analysis by an off-site laboratory. All release closure activities were completed following standard environmental and regulatory guidelines. Based upon site observations during the remedial activities and the soil sample analytical results, which indicated that soil concentrations were below the Nevada Administrative code (NAC) Action Level of 100 mg/kg, it is anticipated that each of the release CASs be closed without further action.
Date: September 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A microstructural analysis of solder joints from the electronic assemblies of dismantled nuclear weapons

Description: MC1814 Interconnection Boxes from dismantled B57 bombs, and MC2839 firing Sets from retired W70-1 warheads were obtained from the Pantex facility. Printed circuit boards were selected from these components for microstructural analysis of their solder joints. The analysis included a qualitative examination of the solder joints and quantitative assessments of (1) the thickness of the intermetallic compound layer that formed between the solder and circuit board Cu features, and (2) the Pb-rich phase particle distribution within the solder joint microstructure. The MC2839 solder joints had very good workmanship qualities. The intermetallic compound layer stoichiometry was determined to be that of Cu6Sn5. The mean intermetallic compound layer thickness for all solder joints was 0.885 mm. The magnitude of these values did not indicate significant growth over the weapon lifetime. The size distribution of the Pb-rich phase particles for each of the joints were represented by the mean of 9.85 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} mm{sup 2}. Assuming a spherical geometry, the mean particle diameter would be 3.54 mm. The joint-to-joint difference of intermetallic compound layer thickness and Pb-rich particle size distribution was not caused by varying thermal environments, but rather, was a result of natural variations in the joint microstructure that probably existed at the time of manufacture. The microstructural evaluation of the through-hole solder joints form the MC2839 and MC1814 components indicated that the environmental conditions to which these electronic units were exposed in the stockpile, were benign regarding solder joint aging. There was an absence of thermal fatigue damage in MC2839 circuit board, through-hole solder joints. The damage to the eyelet solder joints of the MC1814 more likely represented infant mortality failures at or very near the time of manufacture, resulting from a marginal design status of this type of solder joint design.
Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Vianco, P.T. & Rejent, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calculation of O-ring failure due to material aging

Description: Applications where O-rings are used to isolate atmospheric environments within a structure are critical to weapon reliability. Failure occurs when gases are able to travel from one side of the O-ring to the other. The anticipated cause of failure is the relaxation of the rubber over decades, the reduction in closure force, and the O-ring`s consequent inability to offer a barrier to gas transport. A predictive model with tractable complexity has been developed to predict the time over which an O-ring is able to maintain an acceptable value of closure force.
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Segalman, D.; Weingarten, L. & Chambers, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Semiconductor bridge, SCB, ignition studies of Al/CuO thermite

Description: The authors briefly summarize semiconductor bridge operation and review their ignition studies of Al/CuO thermite as a function of the capacitor discharge unit (CDU) firing set capacitance, charge holder material and morphology of the CuO. Ignition thresholds were obtained using a brass charge holder and a non-conducting fiber-glass-epoxy composite material, G10. At - 18 C and a charge voltage of 50V, the capacitance thresholds were 30.1 {mu}F and 2.0 {mu}F respectively. They also present new data on electrostatic discharge (ESD) and radio frequency (RF) vulnerability tests.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Wackerbarth, D.E. & Mohler, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of the mechanical properties of LTCC ``Green Tape``{trademark} for the MC4352 MET

Description: During the qualification of Low Temperature Cofire Ceramic (LTCC) as an enabling WR packaging technology for manufacturing the MC4352 (MET), issues pertaining to the mechanical performance of the DuPont 951 ``Green Tape{trademark}`` tape were investigated. Understanding the fundamental mechanical performance of the DuPont 951 substrate material, including the effect of surface metallization in STS environments, is required to determine MC4352 survivability. Both fast fracture and slow crack growth behavior were characterized for the MET configuration. A minimum stress threshold of 6.5 Kpsi for slow crack growth was established for substrates containing surface conductors, resistors, and resistor glaze. Finite element analysis was used to optimize the MET substrate thickness and to design the supporting structures to limit mechanical loading of the populated substrate below the slow crack growth threshold. Additionally, test coupons that failed during environmental testing are discussed. The root cause of electrical failures was attributed to solder leaching of the thick film metallization. Changes to solder pad configuration were incorporated to reduce the solder-metallization intermetallic from reaching the substrate interface. Finally, four-point bend tests revealed that the YAG laser approach for sizing LTCC substrates induced flaws, which substantially reduced the overall strength of the test samples as compared to samples sized using a diamond saw.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Uribe, F.; Garrett, S.; Monroe, S. & Burchett, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final environmental impact statement for the Nevada Test Site and off-site locations in the state of Nevada: Mitigation action plan

Description: The DOE Notice of Availability for this environmental impact statement was published in the Federal Register on Friday, October 18, 1996 (61 FR 54437). The final environmental impact statement identifies potential adverse effects resulting from the four use alternatives evaluated and discusses measures that DOE considered for the mitigation of these potential adverse effects. The Secretary of Energy signed the Record of Decision on the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site and other DOE sites in the state of Nevada on December 9, 1996. These decisions will result in the continuation of the multipurpose, multi-program use of the Nevada Test Site, under which DOE will pursue a further diversification of interagency, private industry, and public-education uses while meeting its Defense Program, Waste Management, and Environmental Restoration mission requirements at the Nevada Test Site and other Nevada sites, including the Tonopah Test Range, the Project Shoal Site, the Central Nevada Test Area, and on the Nellis Air Force Range Complex. The Record of Decision also identifies specific mitigation actions beyond the routine day-to-day physical and administrative controls needed for implementation of the decisions. These specific mitigation actions are focused on the transportation of waste and on groundwater availability. This Mitigation Action Plan elaborates on these mitigation commitments.
Date: February 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Critical issues for the application of integrated MEMS/CMOS technologies to inertial measurement units

Description: One of the principal applications of monolithically integrated micromechanical/microelectronic systems has been accelerometers for automotive applications. As integrated MEMS/CMOS technologies such as those developed by U.C. Berkeley, Analog Devices, and Sandia National Laboratories mature, additional systems for more sensitive inertial measurements will enter the commercial marketplace. In this paper, the authors will examine key technology design rules which impact the performance and cost of inertial measurement devices manufactured in integrated MEMS/CMOS technologies. These design parameters include: (1) minimum MEMS feature size, (2) minimum CMOS feature size, (3) maximum MEMS linear dimension, (4) number of mechanical MEMS layers, (5) MEMS/CMOS spacing. In particular, the embedded approach to integration developed at Sandia will be examined in the context of these technology features. Presently, this technology offers MEMS feature sizes as small as 1 {micro}m, CMOS critical dimensions of 1.25 {micro}m, MEMS linear dimensions of 1,000 {micro}m, a single mechanical level of polysilicon, and a 100 {micro}m space between MEMS and CMOS. This is applicable to modern precision guided munitions.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Smith, J.H.; Ellis, J.R.; Montague, S. & Allen, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress report on the accelerator production of tritium materials irradiation program

Description: The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project is developing an accelerator and a spoliation neutron source capable of producing tritium through neutron capture on He-3. A high atomic weight target is used to produce neutrons that are then multiplied and moderated in a blanket prior to capture. Materials used in the target and blanket region of an APT facility will be subjected to several different and mixed particle radiation environments; high energy protons (1-2 GeV), protons in the 20 MeV range, high energy neutrons, and low energy neutrons, depending on position in the target and blanket. Flux levels exceed 10{sup 14}/cm{sup 2}s in some areas. The APT project is sponsoring an irradiation damage effects program that will generate the first data-base for materials exposed to high energy particles typical of spallation neutron sources. The program includes a number of candidate materials in small specimen and model component form and uses the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the 800 MeV, Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator.
Date: May 1997
Creator: Maloy, S. A.; Sommer, W. F.; Brown, R. D. & Roberts, J. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tuff Pile 1 -- A justification of the projection of material properties within a portion of Los Alamos Test Areas 1, 3, 4 and 7 -- Nevada Test Site

Description: The Los Alamos underground nuclear test area which is located west of the Yucca fault and north of Nevada state coordinate N256000 m has been used for testing since 1964. The area encompasses parts of Areas 1, 3, 4 and 7. All of the 25 events conducted in the area have been successfully contained. As knowledge of the geology has improved with additional holes and geophysical surveys, it has become increasingly apparent that this is one of the least complex areas they have for testing outside of Area 3 alluvium. Particularly in the southern three quarters of the area, they found that as each new hole was drilled, the stratigraphy and physical properties encountered were as expected. They have never been surprised. This prompted them to formally evaluate a large portion of the area as a Tuff Pile, a term borrowed from the Area 3 Sandpile, and one that implies that physical properties in the area are sufficiently predictable that most measurements no longer need to be routinely made for containment evaluation. This report is the result of that evaluation.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: App, F.N. & Marusak, N.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Concepts and applications of wireless security systems for tactical, portable, and fixed sites

Description: Intrusion detection systems sometimes use radio signals to convey sensor status in areas that wire conduits do not service or as a redundant path to wired systems. Some applications benefit from radio technology by minimizing setup time and reducing installation and operation costs. In recent years with the explosion in wireless communications, these radio-based security systems have become more capable while lowering costs, size, and power consumption. However, the very nature of radio communication raises issues regarding setup, operation, and security of these systems. Sandia National Laboratories, in cooperation with government and industry, has addressed many of these issues through the analysis and development of security systems, communications protocols, and operational procedures. Message encryption and frequent channel supervision are used to enhance security. Installation and maintenance of these systems are simplified by incorporating built-in radio link analysis, menu-driven configuration equipment, and other techniques. Commercial communications satellites and spread-spectrum radios are also being integrated to provide unique capabilities to the security community. The status of this work is presented here along with details of its development.
Date: June 1, 1997
Creator: Harrington, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department