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On reducing the amplitude of surface waves by source arrays

Description: The Geneva conference of experts stated that surface waves help define the nature of a seismic perturbation. A `phase equalization` method has been proposed by several seismologists to determine the polarity of the source using crustal surface waves. In this report a horizontal source array is designed which will reduce the amplitude of the crustal surface waves by a factor of five. Experimental data from Geophysical Prospecting is cited to support the effectiveness of such arrays. It is thought that phase shifts will accompany this amplitude reduction. It is concluded that these amplitude and phase changes will make the phase equalization method unreliable. The significance of the report is that the Geneva negotiations must take into account the possibility of horizontal as well as vertical arrays.
Date: November 23, 1959
Creator: Werth, G. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of the hydrologic source term from underground nuclear tests in Frenchman Flat at the Nevada Test Site: The Cambric test

Description: The objectives of this project are to develop and apply a modeling frame- work to quantitatively evaluate the nature and extent of radionuclide migration within the immediate, near field environment about an underground nuclear test. Specifically, it will involve evaluation of ² The speciation and abundance of radionuclides that are introduced into groundwater as aqueous species or colloids, and ² The rate and extent of radionuclide movement, dilution, and reaction in groundwater surrounding the working point of a test. To be clear, interest will only be focused on processes that have occurred well after the nuclear test, as opposed to the more dynamic processes that take place during or immediately after detonation. The meaning of "near field" in this case will loosely refer to a volume of diameter 4-8 R<sub>c</sub>, centered on the working point and chimney of the test, where Rc is the radius of the blast cavity. For a given nuclear test, this information will collectively comprise the test's "hydrologic source term". This work relies on and is being supported by existing data, analyses, and interpretations that have been made at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the American nuclear test program and previous and ongoing studies related to radionuclide migration in the subsurface (Kersting, 1996).
Date: March 23, 1999
Creator: Bourcier, W L; Bruton, C J; Carle, S F; Kersting, A B; Pawloski, G A; Rard, J A et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ASSESSING THE PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE OF INNOVATIVE NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES.

Description: The National Nuclear Security Administration is developing methods for nonproliferation assessments to support the development and implementation of U.S. nonproliferation policy. This paper summarizes the key results of that effort. Proliferation resistance is the degree of difficulty that a nuclear material, facility, process, or activity poses to the acquisition of one or more nuclear weapons. A top-level measure of proliferation resistance for a fuel cycle system is developed here from a hierarchy of metrics. At the lowest level, intrinsic and extrinsic barriers to proliferation are defined. These barriers are recommended as a means to characterize the proliferation characteristics of a fuel cycle. Because of the complexity of nonproliferation assessments, the problem is decomposed into: metrics to be computed, barriers to proliferation, and a finite set of threats. The spectrum of potential threats of nuclear proliferation is complex and ranges from small terrorist cells to industrialized countries with advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Two general categories of methods have historically been used for nonproliferation assessments: attribute analysis and scenario analysis. In the former, attributes of the systems being evaluated (often fuel cycle systems) are identified that affect their proliferation potential. For a particular system under consideration, the attributes are weighted subjectively. In scenario analysis, hypothesized scenarios of pathways to proliferation are examined. The analyst models the process undertaken by the proliferant to overcome barriers to proliferation and estimates the likelihood of success in achieving a proliferation objective. An attribute analysis approach should be used at the conceptual design level in the selection of fuel cycles that will receive significant investment for development. In the development of a detailed facility design, a scenario approach should be undertaken to reduce the potential for design vulnerabilities. While, there are distinctive elements in each approach, an analysis could be performed that utilizes aspects of each approach.
Date: June 23, 2003
Creator: BARI,R.; ROGLANS,J.; DENNING,R. & MLADINEO,S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recovery of Plutonium from Refractory Residues Using a Sodium Peroxide Pretreatment Process

Description: The recycle of plutonium from refractory residues is a necessary activity for the nuclear weapon production complex. Traditionally, high-fired plutonium oxide (PuO2) was leached from the residue matrix using a nitric acid/fluoride dissolving flowsheet. The recovery operations were time consuming and often required multiple contacts with fresh dissolving solution to reduce the plutonium concentration to levels where residual solids could be discarded. Due to these drawbacks, the development of an efficient process for the recovery of plutonium from refractory materials is desirable. To address this need, a pretreatment process was developed. The development program utilized a series of small-scale experiments to optimize processing conditions for the fusion process and demonstrate the plutonium recovery efficiency using ceramic materials developed as potential long-term storage forms for PuO2 and an incinerator ash from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) as te st materials.
Date: October 23, 2003
Creator: Rudisill, T.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LLL comments on The Ultimate Catastrophe

Description: This correspondence provides a discussion of purported hazards of nuclear energy production and weapons research. The possibility of atmospheric burn and oceanic burn are discounted, and the cross sections of Nitrogen are investigated and the concentration of D[sub 2]O in the oceans are considered. In conclusion, extremely conservative calculations demonstrated that it is completely impossible for either the earth`s atmosphere or sea to sustain fusion reactions of either thermonuclear nuclear chain reaction type. And, in particular, such reactions cannot be triggered by the explosion of nuclear weapons, even those having unrealistically high yield and impractical high yield-to-weight.
Date: December 23, 1975
Creator: Batzel, R.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Wooden explosives for woodcock

Description: The explosives group of the Chemistry Division has spent considerable time on the high explosives portion of the Woodcock program. The preliminary results obtained in the course of this investigation as well as data accumulated at other laboratories throughout the country are presented in this memorandum. Part I is concerned with the preparation and properties of the most promising `wooden` explosives (shock insensitive and high-temperature stable) explosives. Part II deals with several substitute explosives which could be used immediately in a hydrodynamic program. Part III presents a tentative schedule and indicates the role various groups at UCRL have agreed to play in the Woodcock explosives program for the next few weeks.
Date: July 23, 1958
Creator: Kury, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Special Nevada report

Description: This report is submitted to Congress by the Secretary of the Air Force, the Secretary of the Navy, and the Secretary of the Interior pursuant to Section 6 of the Military Lands Withdrawal Act of 1986. It contains an analysis and evaluation of the effects on public health and safety resulting from DOD and Department of Energy (DOE) military and defense-related uses on withdrawn public lands in the State of Nevada and in airspace overlying the State. This report describes the cumulative impacts of those activities on public and private property in Nevada and on plants, fish and wildlife, cultural, historic, scientific, recreational, wilderness and other resources of the public lands of Nevada. An analysis and evaluation of possible measures to mitigate the cumulative effects of the withdrawal of lands and the use of airspace in Nevada for defense-related purposes was conducted, and those considered practical are listed.
Date: September 23, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fatigue of LX-14 and LX-19 plastic bonded explosives

Description: The DOD uses the plastic bonded explosive (PBX) LX-14 in a wide variety of applications including shaped charges and explosively forged projectiles. LX- 19 is a higher energy explosive, which could be easily substituted for LX-14 because it contains the identical Estane 5703p binder and more energetic CL-20 explosive. Delivery systems for large shaped charges, such as TOW-2, include the Apache helicopter. Loads associated with vibrations and expansion from thermal excursions in field operations may, even at low levels over long time periods, cause flaws, already present in the PBX to grow. Flaws near the explosive/liner interface of a shaped charge can reduce performance. Small flaws in explosives are one mechanism (the hot spot mechanism) proposed for initiation and growth to detonation of PBXs like LX-14, PBXN 5, LX-04 and LX-17 among others. Unlike cast-cured explosives and propellants, PBXs cannot usually be compression molded to full density. Generally, the amount of explosive ignited by a shock wave is approximately equal to the original void volume. Whether or not these flaws or cracks grow during field operations to an extent sufficient to adversely affect the shaped charge performance or increase the vulnerability of the PBX is the ultimate question this effort could address. Currently the fatigue life of LX-14 under controlled conditions is being studied in order to generate its failure stress as a function of the number of fatigue cycles (S- N curve). Proposed future work will address flaw and crack growth and their relationship to hot-spot concentration and explosive vulnerability to shock and/or fragment initiation.
Date: April 23, 1998
Creator: Hoffman, D. M., LLNL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electrical Contact Performance Degradation in Electromechanical Components

Description: Detailed materials evaluations have been performed for MC2969 Intent Stronglink switch monitor circuit parts returned from the field out of retired weapon systems. Evaluations of local contact resistance, surface chemical composition and surface roughness and wear have been determined as a function of component level contact loop resistance testing position. Several degradation mechanisms have been identified and correlated with the component level measurements. Operational degradation produces surface smoothing and wear with each actuation of the monitor circuit, while aging degradation is observed in the segregation of contaminant species and alloy constituent elements to the surface in the stressed wear regions.
Date: March 23, 1999
Creator: Peebles, D.E.; Dugger, M.T.; Neff, S.G.; Sorroche, E.H.; Robinson, J.A.; Fanska, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Simulation of the SRI International test Gun-27 using the PAGOSA code

Description: SRI International conducted a set of impact tests with flat disks hitting water-filled chemical submunitions. One of these tests, called Gun-27, involved a 595 gram disk hitting the side of a submunition at 200 m/s. This test was simulated using the PAGOSA code with a materials model that was a good overall match to the data, and with a sequence of five mesh sizes. It was found that when a mesh was used which had at least five cells across the wall of the submunition, PAGOSA was able to provide reasonably satisfactory agreement with the test results, except for the partial fracture of a welded joint. One feature of the test that was reproduced very well by the simulation that used the finest mesh was the fracture of the diaphragm around its edge. Results are compared for all five simulations so that trends can be seen.
Date: June 23, 1997
Creator: Jacoby, J.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of {micro}Chemlab{sup TM}/CG for Detection of Biotoxins

Description: The authors have developed a research prototype device for low level detection of SEB, ricin, botulinum toxin and ovalbumin in liquid samples. This hand-held, low power device analyzes samples by capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) in a parallel microchannel format, and provides sensitive detection of fluorescently-tagged analytes using miniature 392 nm diode laser-induced fluorescence. They have successfully demonstrated simultaneous parallel channel separations, fully automated high voltage control of fluidics and automated data analysis with toxin identification and semi-quantitation in the presence of aerosol backgrounds in a stand-alone self-contained unit. Tests of the fully integrated device indicate high sensitivity detection (as low as 5 nM) and cycle times of 5-10 minutes.
Date: October 23, 2000
Creator: Fruetel, J.; Renzi, R.; Crocker, R.; VanderNoot, V.; Ferko, S.; Stamps, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, February 2001)

Description: This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended Corrective Action Alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490, Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 490 is located on the Nellis Air Force Range and the Tonopah Test Range and is approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. This CAU is comprised of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (located southwest of Area 3); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area (located west of Main Lake); 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard (located north of the northwest corner of Area 3); and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area (located south of the Area 9 Compound on the TTR). A Corrective Action Investigation was performed in July and August 2000, and analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against preliminary action levels to determine contaminants of concern (COCs). There were no COCs identified in soil at the Gun Propellant Burn Area or the Station 44 Burn Area; therefore, there is no need for corrective actions at these two sites. Five soil samples at the Fire Training Area and seven at the Sandia Service Yard exceeded PALs for total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel. Upon the identification of COCs specific to CAU 490, Corrective Action Objectives were developed based on a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the TTR, with the following three CAAs under consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure In Place - No Further Action With Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Clean Closure by Excavation and Disposal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection ...
Date: February 23, 2001
Creator: United States. Department of Energy. Nevada Operations Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

Description: This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report (CADD/CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, CAU 232 is comprised of Corrective Action Site 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon. This CADD/CR identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) recommendation that no corrective action is deemed necessary for CAU 232. The Corrective Action Decision Document and Closure Report have been combined into one report because sample data collected during the July 1999 corrective action investigation (CAI) activities disclosed no evidence of contamination at the site. Contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) addressed during the CAI included total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total pesticides, total herbicides, total petroleum hydrocarbons (gasoline and diesel/oil range), polychlorinated biphenyls, isotopic uranium, isotopic plutonium, strontium-90, and gamma-emitting radionuclides. The data confirmed that none of the COPCs identified exceeded preliminary action levels outlined in the CAIP; therefore, no corrective actions were necessary for CAU 232. After the CAI, best management practice activities were completed and included installation of a fence and signs to limit access to the lagoons, cementing Manhole No. 2 and the diverter box, and closing off influent and effluent ends of the sewage lagoon piping. As a result of the CAI, the DOE/NV recommended that: (1) no further actions were required; (2) no Corrective Action Plan would be required; and (3) no use restrictions were required to be placed on the CAU.
Date: December 23, 1999
Creator: United States. Department of Energy. Nevada Operations Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CORRRECTIVE ACTION DECISION DOCUMENT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 427: AREA 3 SEPTIC WASTE SYSTEMS 2 AND 6, TONOPAH TEST RANGE, NEVADA, REVISION 0, JUNE 1998

Description: This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 2 and 6 (Corrective Action Unit 427) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 427 is located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and is comprised of the following Corrective Action Sites, each an individual septic waste system (DOE/NV, 1996a): (1) Septic Waste System 2 is Corrective Action Site Number 03-05-002-SW02. (2) Septic Waste System 6 is Corrective Action Site Number 03-05-002-SW06. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for each Corrective Action Site. The scope of this Correction Action Decision Document consists of the following tasks: (1) Develop corrective action objectives. (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria. (3) Develop corrective action alternatives. (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria. (5) Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for each CAS. From November 1997 through January 1998, a corrective action investigation was performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit No. 427: Area 3 Septic Waste System Numbers 2 and 6, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (DOE/NV, 1997b). Details can be found in Appendix A of this document. The results indicated that contamination is present in some portions of the CAU and not in others as described in Table ES-1 and shown in Figure A.2-2 of Appendix A. Based on the potential exposure pathways, the following corrective action objectives have been identified for Corrective Action Unit 427: (1) Prevent or mitigate human exposure to subsurface soils containing TPH at concentrations greater than 100 milligrams per kilogram (NAC, ...
Date: June 23, 1998
Creator: /NV, DOE
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The incorporation of high resolution climatological data into environmental tactical decision aids.

Description: The environment can significantly impact the performance of weapons systems and how they are used in a theater of operations. A tool has been developed by the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) to enable operators to assess the impact of environmental factors on the performance of military systems, subsystems, and components. The ARL system, the Integrated Weather Effects Decision Aid (IWEDA) takes weather and environmental data and compares them to a set of rules that relate environmental parameters to weapons system performance. The results from the IWEDA system can enable operators to identify regions and time periods when weapons system performance may be marginal or unfavorable. The Department of Defense (DOD) Air and Space Natural Environment (ASNE) Executive Agents have developed a program, the Advanced Climate Modeling and Environmental Simulations (ACMES), to produce high resolution gridded data for use in generating high resolution climate statistics from simulated weather observations at any desired location around the world. It is intended that data from the ACMES effort could be used by commanders to assess the environmental effects on operations. This paper describes an effort to use data generated from ACMES to drive the IWEDA rules on system performance. The results from this effort are high resolution, gridded values of weapons performance statistics that can be used to support the mission planning cycle.
Date: September 23, 1999
Creator: Hummel, J. R.; Campbell, A. P.; Kehrer, M. L.; Lurie, G. R. & Simunich, K. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Photoproduction of tritium

Description: {sup 3}H (Tritium) is required for maintenance of nuclear weapons in the stockpile. The National Defense need for {sup 3}H was historically met by the Savannah River Facility. This facility is no longer safe for operation. {sup 3}H decays with a mean lifetime {tau} = 17.8 y, and therefore new methods of {sup 3}H production are required to meet US military requirements. Irradiation of {sup 7}Li by low-energy photons produces tritium ({sup 3}H) via the photodisintegration process. Waste heat from the {sup 7}Li target can be extracted and used for the direct generation of electricity. Other advantages include: negligible residual radioactivity, simple target technology, small low-energy electron accelerators for bremsstrahlung production (the photon source), developed liquid metal technology, modularity, simple extraction of {sup 3}H from a recirculating {sup 7}Li target, abundant supply of {sup 7}Li, and straightforward target-accelerator-bremsstrahlung converter interface. A schematic plant characterized by very low risk is described, and a figure-of-merit is obtained.
Date: March 23, 1995
Creator: Becker, J. A.; Anderson, J. D. & Weiss, M. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Excavation and Remediation of the Sandia National Laboratories Chemical Waste Landfill

Description: The Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) is a 1.9-acre disposal site that was used for the disposal of chemical wastes generated by many of SNL/NM research laboratories from 1962 until 1985. These laboratories were primarily involved in the design, research and development of non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons and the waste generated by these labs included small quantities of a wide assortment of chemical products. A Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan for the Chemical Waste Landfill was approved by the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) in 1992. Subsequent site characterization activities identified the presence of significant amounts of chromium in the soil as far as 80 feet below ground surface (fbgs) and the delineation of a solvent plume in the vadose zone that extends to groundwater approximately 500 fbgs. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was detected in some groundwater samples at concentrations slightly above the drinking water limit of 5 parts per billion. In 1997 an active vapor extraction system reduced the size of the TCE vapor plume and for the last six quarterly sampling events groundwater samples have not detected TCE above the drinking water standard. A source term removal, being conducted as a Voluntary Corrective Measure (VCM), began in September 1998 and is expected to take up to two years. Four distinct disposal areas were identified from historical data and the contents of disposal pits and trenches in these areas, in addition to much of the highly contaminated soil surrounding the disposal cells, are currently being excavated. Buried waste and debris are expected to extend to a depth of 12 to 15 fbgs. Excavation will focus on the removal of buried debris and contaminated soil in a sequential, area by area manner and will proceed to whatever depth is required in order to ...
Date: November 23, 1999
Creator: KWIECINSKI,DANIEL ALBERT; METHVIN,RHONDA KAY; SCHOFIELD,DONALD P. & YOUNG,SHARISSA G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LLNL's Regional Seismic Discrimination Research

Description: As part of the Department of Energy's research and development effort to improve the monitoring capability of the planned Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty international monitoring system, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL) is testing and calibrating regional seismic discrimination algorithms in the Middle East, North Africa and Western Former Soviet Union. The calibration process consists of a number of steps: (1) populating the database with independently identified regional events; (2) developing regional boundaries and pre-identifying severe regional phase blockage zones; (3) measuring and calibrating coda based magnitude scales; (4a) measuring regional amplitudes and making magnitude and distance amplitude corrections (MDAC); (4b) applying the DOE modified kriging methodology to MDAC results using the regionalized background model; (5) determining the thresholds of detectability of regional phases as a function of phase type and frequency; (6) evaluating regional phase discriminant performance both singly and in combination; (7) combining steps 1-6 to create a calibrated discrimination surface for each stations; (8) assessing progress and iterating. We have now developed this calibration procedure to the point where it is fairly straightforward to apply earthquake-explosion discrimination in regions with ample empirical data. Several of the steps outlined above are discussed in greater detail in other DOE papers in this volume or in recent publications. Here we emphasize the results of the above process: station correction surfaces and their improvement to discrimination results compared with simpler calibration methods. Some of the outstanding discrimination research issues involve cases in which there is little or no empirical data. For example in many cases there is no regional nuclear explosion data at IMS stations or nearby surrogates. We have taken two approaches to this problem, first finding and using mining explosion data when available, and second using test-site based models to transport earthquake-explosion discrimination behavior to new regions. Finally an important component of ...
Date: July 23, 1999
Creator: Hanley, W; Mayeda, K; Myers, S; Pasyanos, M; Rodgers, A; Sicherman, A et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analytic model of ion emission from the focus of an intense relativistic electron beam on a target

Description: Advanced radiographic systems for stockpile stewardship require very small x-ray sources to achieve the required resolution. Focusing multi-kiloampere beams to diameters on the order of 1 mm onto a Bremsstrahlung target leads to the generation of axial electric fields on the order of several MV/cm which act to extract ions out of the surface plasma and accelerate them upstream into the beam. These backstreaming ions act as a distributed electrostatic lens which can perturb the focus of the electron beam in a time varying manner during the pulse. An analytic model of the ion extraction is presented for a particular target geometry along with scaling laws for the perturbation of the focal spot.
Date: August 23, 1998
Creator: Caporaso, G. J. & Chen, Y. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Magnetotelluric Data, Across Quartzite Ridge, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

Description: Nuclear weapons are integral to the defense of the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as the steward of these devices, must continue to gauge the efficacy of the individual weapons. This could be accomplished by occasional testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, northwest of Las Vegas. Yucca Flat Basin is one of the testing areas at the NTS. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area subsequent to a nuclear test. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and processed Magnetotelluric (MT) and Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to help characterize this pre-Tertiary geology. That work will help to define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU) in the Yucca Flat area. Interpretation will include a three-dimensional (3-D) character analysis and two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model. The purpose of this report is to release the MT soundings across Quartzite Ridge, Profiles 5, 6a, and 6b, as shown in Figure 1. No interpretation of the data is included here.
Date: November 23, 2005
Creator: Williams, J.M. & B.D. Rodriguez, and T.H. Asch
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Magnetotelluric Data, North Central Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

Description: Nuclear weapons are integral to the defense of the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as the steward of these devices, must continue to gauge the efficacy of the individual weapons. This could be accomplished by occasional testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, northwest of Las Vegas. Yucca Flat Basin is one of the testing areas at the NTS. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area subsequent to a nuclear test. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and processed Magnetotelluric (MT) and Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to help characterize this pre-Tertiary geology. That work will help to define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU) in the Yucca Flat area. Interpretation will include a three-dimensional (3-D) character analysis and two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data for north central Yucca Flat, Profile 7, as shown in Figure 1. No interpretation of the data is included here.
Date: November 23, 2005
Creator: Williams, J.M. & B.D. Rodriguez, and T.H. Asch
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Magnetotelluric Data, Central Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

Description: Nuclear weapons are integral to the defense of the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as the steward of these devices, must continue to gauge the efficacy of the individual weapons. This could be accomplished by occasional testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, northwest of Las Vegas. Yucca Flat Basin is one of the testing areas at the NTS. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area subsequent to a nuclear test. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and processed Magnetotelluric (MT) and Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to help characterize this pre-Tertiary geology. That work will help to define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU) in the Yucca Flat area. Interpretation will include a three-dimensional (3-D) character analysis and two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data for Central Yucca Flat, Profile 1, as shown in figure 1. No interpretation of the data is included here.
Date: November 23, 2005
Creator: Williams, J.M. & B.D. Rodriguez, and T.H. Asch
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Magnetotelluric Data, Northern Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

Description: Nuclear weapons are integral to the defense of the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy, as the steward of these devices, must continue to gauge the efficacy of the individual weapons. This could be accomplished by occasional testing at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada, northwest of Las Vegas. Yucca Flat Basin is one of the testing areas at the NTS. One issue of concern is the nature of the somewhat poorly constrained pre-Tertiary geology and its effects on ground-water flow in the area subsequent to a nuclear test. Ground-water modelers would like to know more about the hydrostratigraphy and geologic structure to support a hydrostratigraphic framework model that is under development for the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). During 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected and processed Magnetotelluric (MT) and Audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) data at the Nevada Test Site in and near Yucca Flat to help characterize this pre-Tertiary geology. That work will help to define the character, thickness, and lateral extent of pre-Tertiary confining units. In particular, a major goal has been to define the upper clastic confining unit (UCCU) in the Yucca Flat area. Interpretation will include a three-dimensional (3-D) character analysis and two-dimensional (2-D) resistivity model. The purpose of this report is to release the MT sounding data for Profile 2, (fig. 1), located in the northern Yucca Flat area. No interpretation of the data is included here.
Date: November 23, 2005
Creator: Williams, J.M. & B.D. Rodriguez, and T.H. Asch
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department