1,531 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

The Development of 6061-Aluminum Windows for the MICE LiquidAbsorber

Description: The thin windows for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) liquid Absorber will be fabricated from 6061-T6-aluminum. The absorber and vacuum vessel thin windows are 300-mm in diameter and are 180 mm thick at the center. The windows are designed for an internal burst pressure of 0.68 MPa (100 psig) when warm. The MICE experiment design calls for changeable windows on the absorber, so a bolted window design was adopted. Welded windows offer some potential advantages over bolted windows when they are on the absorber itself. This report describes the bolted window and its seal. This report also describes an alternate window that is welded directly to the absorber body. The welded window design presented permits the weld to be ground off and re-welded. This report presents a thermal FEA analysis of the window seal-weld, while the window is being welded. Finally, the results of a test of a welded-window are presented.
Date: August 24, 2005
Creator: Lau, W.; Yang, S.Q.; Green, M.A.; Ishimoto, S. & Swanson, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MUON ACCELERATION

Description: One of the major motivations driving recent interest in FFAGs is their use for the cost-effective acceleration of muons. This paper summarizes the progress in this area that was achieved leading up to and at the FFAG workshop at KEK from July 7-12, 2003. Much of the relevant background and references are also given here, to give a context to the progress we have made.
Date: November 18, 2003
Creator: BERG,S. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Search for Ultra High-Energy Neutrinos with AMANDA-II

Description: A search for diffuse neutrinos with energies in excess of 10{sup 5} GeV is conducted with AMANDA-II data recorded between 2000 and 2002. Above 10{sup 7} GeV, the Earth is essentially opaque to neutrinos. This fact, combined with the limited overburden of the AMANDA-II detector (roughly 1.5 km), concentrates these ultra high-energy neutrinos at the horizon. The primary background for this analysis is bundles of downgoing, high-energy muons from the interaction of cosmic rays in the atmosphere. No statistically significant excess above the expected background is seen in the data, and an upper limit is set on the diffuse all-flavor neutrino flux of E{sup 2} {Phi}{sub 90%CL} < 2.7 x 10{sup -7} GeV cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} valid over the energy range of 2 x 10{sup 5} GeV to 10{sup 9} GeV. A number of models which predict neutrino fluxes from active galactic nuclei are excluded at the 90% confidence level.
Date: November 19, 2007
Creator: Collaboration, IceCube; Klein, Spencer & Ackermann, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ATLAS TrackingEvent Data Model -- 12.0.0

Description: In this report the event data model (EDM) relevant for tracking in the ATLAS experiment is presented. The core component of the tracking EDM is a common track object which is suited to describe tracks in the innermost tracking sub-detectors and in the muon detectors in offline as well as online reconstruction. The design of the EDM was driven by a demand for modularity and extensibility while taking into account the different requirements of the clients. The structure of the track object and the representation of the tracking-relevant information are described in detail.
Date: July 23, 2006
Creator: ATLAS; Akesson, F.; Atkinson, T.; Costa, M.J.; Elsing, M.; Fleischmann, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flavorful supersymmetry

Description: Weak scale supersymmetry provides elegant solutions to many of the problems of the standard model, but it also generically gives rise to excessive flavor and CP violation. We show that, if the mechanism that suppresses the Yukawa couplings also suppresses flavor changing interactions in the supersymmetry breaking parameters, essentially all the low energy flavor and CP constraints can be satisfied. The standard assumption of flavor universality in the supersymmetry breaking sector is not necessary. We study signatures of this framework at the LHC. The mass splitting among different generations of squarks and sleptons can be much larger than in conventional scenarios, and even the mass ordering can be changed. We find that there is a plausible scenario in which the next-to-lightest superparticle is a long-lived right-handed selectron or smuon which decays into the lightest superparticle, a gravitino. This leads to the spectacularsignature of monochromatic electrons or muons in a stopper detector, providing strong evidence for the framework.
Date: December 13, 2007
Creator: Nomura, Yasunori; Nomura, Yasunori; Papucci, Michele & Stolarski, Daniel
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MUON SOURCES, NEUTRINO FACTORY TO MU+- COLLIDERS.

Description: Employing intense muon sources to carry out forefront low energy research, such as the search for muon - number non-conservation, or for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams ({nu}factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multiturn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and development. A muon collider require basically same number of muons as for the muon storage ring Neutrino Factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both {+-}{mu}. We present an overview of Muon Sources - Neutrino Factories, example of a muon storage ring at BNL, and possible upgrades to a full Muon Collider.
Date: June 10, 2000
Creator: PARSA,Z.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

MUON SOURCES, NEUTRINO FACTORY TO MU+- COLLIDERS.

Description: Employing intense muon sources to carry out forefront low energy research, such as the search for muon - number non-conservation, or for the purpose of providing intense high energy neutrino beams ({nu}factory) represents very interesting possibilities. If successful, such efforts would significantly advance the state of muon technology and provides intermediate steps in technologies required for a future high energy muon collider complex. High intensity muon: production, capture, cooling, acceleration and multiturn muon storage rings are some of the key technology issues that needs more studies and development. A muon collider require basically same number of muons as for the muon storage ring Neutrino Factory, but would require more cooling, and simultaneous capture of both {+-}{mu}. We present an overview of Muon Sources - Neutrino Factories, example of a muon storage ring at BNL, and possible upgrades to a full Muon Collider.
Date: June 10, 2000
Creator: Parsa, Z.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS POTENTIAL AT MUON COLLIDERS

Description: In this paper, high energy physics possibilities and future colliders are discussed. The {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} collider and experiments with high intensity muon beams as the stepping phase towards building Higher Energy Muon Colliders (HEMC) are briefly reviewed and encouraged.
Date: April 7, 2000
Creator: Parsa, Z.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comments on frictional cooling and the zero energy options for cooling intense muon beams

Description: It is shown that the proposed frictional cooling method is not directly applicable to intense ({approximately} 10{sup 12}) muon bunches, mostly due to space charge constraints. Other difficulties stem from the fact that the initial emittance must be quite small, compared to the nominal muon collider emittance. Excessive heat due to energy deposition in the foils, from the primary muon beam or from secondary electrons could also destroy the thin foils used as moderator. Other zero energy schemes are considered, separately for {mu}{sup {minus}} and {mu}{sup +}. All of them lead the authors to the study of exotic electrons-ions-muons plasma.
Date: February 1, 2000
Creator: Lebrun, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration R and D Program

Description: The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) comprises some 140 scientists and engineers located at U.S. National Laboratories and Universities, and at a number of non-U.S. research institutions. In the past year, the MC R and D program has shifted its focus mainly toward the design issues related to the development of a Neutrino Factory based on a muon storage ring. In this paper the status of the various R and D activities is described, and future plans are outlined.
Date: July 1, 2000
Creator: Zisman, M.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Muon-induced backgrounds in the CUORICINO experiment

Description: To better understand the contribution of cosmic ray muons to the CUORICINO background, ten plastic scintillator detectors were installed at the CUORICINO siteand operated during the final 3 months of the experiment. From these measurements, an upper limit of 0.0021 counts/(keV.kg.yr) (95percent c.l.) was obtained on the cosmicray induced background in the neutrinoless double beta decay region of interest. The measurements were also compared to Geant4 simulations.
Date: April 15, 2010
Creator: Andreotti, E.; Arnaboldi, C.; Avignone III, F. T.; Balata, M.; Bandac, I.; Barucci, M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Muon Fluence Measurements for Homeland Security Applications

Description: This report focuses on work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to better characterize aspects of backgrounds in RPMs deployed for homeland security purposes. Two polyvinyl toluene scintillators were utilized with supporting NIM electronics to measure the muon coincidence rate. Muon spallation is one mechanism by which background neutrons are produced. The measurements performed concentrated on a broad investigation of the dependence of the muon flux on a) variations in solid angle subtended by the detector; b) the detector inclination with the horizontal; c) depth underground; and d) diurnal effects. These tests were conducted inside at Building 318/133, outdoors at Building 331G, and underground at Building 3425 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.
Date: August 10, 2010
Creator: Ankney, Austin S.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Borgardt, James D. & Kouzes, Richard T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thoughts on Incorporating HPRF in a Linear Cooling Channel

Description: We discuss a possible implementation of high-pressure gas-filled RF (HPRF) cavities in a linear cooling channel for muons and some of the technical issues that must be dealt with. The approach we describe is a hybrid approach that uses high-pressure hydrogen gas to avoid cavity breakdown, along with discrete LiH absorbers to provide the majority of the energy loss. Initial simulations show that the channel performs as well as the original vacuum RF channel while potentially avoiding the degradation in RF gradient associated with the strong magnetic field in the cooling channel.
Date: August 20, 2009
Creator: Gallardo, Juan C. & Zisman, Michael S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Future experiments with neutrino superbeams, beta-beams, and neutrino factories

Description: This report describes the goals of the next generations of accelerator-based neutrino experiments, and the various strategies that are being considered to achieve those goals. Because these next steps in the field are significantly different from the current or previous steps, novel techniques must be considered for both the detectors and the neutrino beams themselves. We consider not only conventional neutrino beams created by decays of pions, but also those which could be made by decays of beams of relativistic isotopes (so-called ''beta-beams'') and also by decays of beams of muons (neutrino factories).
Date: October 27, 2003
Creator: Harris, Deborah A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Muon Collider: Muon Generation, Capture and Cooling

Description: A {mu}{sup +} -{mu}{sup -} collider requires a high-intensity proton source for {pi}-production, a high-acceptance {pi}-{mu} decay channel, a {mu}-cooling system, a rapid acceleration system, and a high-luminosity collider ring for the collision of short, intense {mu}{sup +} -{mu}{sup -} bunches. Critical problems exist in developing and compressing high-energy proton bunches for producing {pi}�s, in capturing {pi}�s and their decay {mu}�s, and in cooling {mu}�s into a compressed phase-space at which high luminosity collisions are possible. These problems and some possible solutions are discussed; the current {mu}{sup +} -{mu}{sup -} collider research program is described
Date: February 16, 1999
Creator: Neuffer, David
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flavor and CP violations from sleptons at the Muon Collider

Description: Supersymmetric theories generally have new flavor and CP violation sources in the squark and slepton mass matrices. They will contribute to the lepton flavor violation processes, such as {mu}{yields}e{gamma}, which can be probed far below the current bound with an intense muon source at the front end of the muon collider. In addition, if sleptons can be produced at the muon collider, the flavor violation can occur at their production and decay, allowing us to probe the flavor mixing structure directly. Asymmetry between numbers of {mu}{sup +}e{sup -} and e{sup +}{mu}{sup -} events will be a sign for CP violation in supersymmetric flavor mixing.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Cheng, H.-C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Compositeness test at the FMC with Bhabha scattering

Description: It is possible that quarks and/or leptons have substructure that will become manifest at high energies. Here we investigate the limits on the muon compositeness scale that could be obtained at the First Muon Collider using Bhabha scattering. We study this limit as a function of the collider energy and the angular cut imposed by the detector capability.
Date: January 1, 1998
Creator: Eichten, E.J. & Keller, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department