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High efficiency muon beam

Description: Aspects of muon beams pertinent to the establishment of an effective nucleon structure facility are discussed and a preliminary design for such a beam at NAL is advanced. The optical properties, duty factor and proton beam source are already able to be sharply specified, but the pion and muon transports need more work to be optimal. It is already clear, however, that efficiency gains of at least 20 can be made and probably- factors of 50 or even 100 are not impossible. Beam/halo ratios can probably be raised to 14: 1 with proper spoilers. Most important of all, the effective beam time can be raised an order of magnitude over present prospects by establishing a separate source of protons for a muon beam by means of a split or pulsed switch in the present neutrino beam time. (auth)
Date: September 1, 1973
Creator: Kirk, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations

Description: Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.
Date: July 1, 2012
Creator: C. Y. Yoshikawa, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov, D.V. Neuffer, K. Yonehara
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations

Description: Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.
Date: May 1, 2012
Creator: Neuffer, D.V.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Johnson, R.P.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

50x50 GeV Muon Collider Beam Collimation

Description: A summary of different techniques and systems to scrape beam halo in a 50 x 50 GeV {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider is presented. Such systems are installed in a special utility section with optics specifically designed to meet both the requirements of the scraping system and of injection. Results froma realistic Monte Carlo simulation (STRUCT-MARS) show that a system consisting of steel absorbers several meters in length suppresses halo-induced backgrounds in the collider detector by more than three orders of magnitude. The heat load in superconducting magnets near the scraper system can be reduced to tolerable levels by appropriate collimator design and location. This reduction applies to both injection and collider mode of operation. Also discussed is extraction of halo particles using electrostatic deflectors and bent crys-tals, although neither appears to be effective for a muon collider at this energy.
Date: April 14, 1999
Creator: Drozhdin, A. I.; Johnstone, C. J.; Mokhov, N. V.; Garen, A. A. & Biryukov, V. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An ionization cooling channel for muon beams based on alternating solenoids

Description: The muon collider requires intense, cooled muon bunches to reach the required luminosity. Due to the limited life-time of the muon, the cooling process must take place very rapidly. Ionization cooling seems to be our only option, given the large emittances of the muon beam from pion decay. However, this ionization cooling method has been found quite difficult to implement in practice. We describe a scheme based on the use of liquid hydrogen absorbers fol-lowed by r.f. cavities (�pillbox� or �open iris� type), em-bedded in a transport lattice based on high field solenoids. These solenoidal fields are reversed periodically in order to suppress the growth of the canonical angular momentum. This channel has been simulated in detail with independent codes, featuring conventional tracking in e.m. fields and de-tailed simulation of multiple scattering and straggling in the the absorbers and windows. These calculations show that the 15 Tesla lattice cools in 6-Dphase space by a factor {approx} 2 over a distance of 20 m.
Date: April 16, 1999
Creator: al., Juan C. Gallardo et
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ACCELERATION FOR A HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDER

Description: The authors describe a method for designing the acceleration systems for a muon collider, with particular application and examples for a high energy muon collider. This paper primarily concentrates on design considerations coming from longitudinal motion, but some transverse issues are briefly discussed.
Date: April 7, 2000
Creator: BERG,J.S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOGBONE GEOMETRY FOR RECIRCULATING ACCELERATORS.

Description: Most scenarios for accelerating muons require recirculating acceleration. A racetrack shape for the accelerator requires particles with lower energy in early passes to traverse almost the same length of arc as particles with the highest energy. This extra arc length may lead to excess decays and excess cost. Changing the geometry to a dogbone shape, where there is a single linac and the beam turns completely around at the end of the linac, returning to the same end of the linac from which it exited, addresses this problem. In this design, the arc lengths can be proportional to the particle's momentum. This paper proposes an approximate cost model for a recirculating accelerator, attempts to make cost-optimized designs for both racetrack and dogbone geometries, and demonstrates that the dogbone geometry does appear to be more cost effective.
Date: June 18, 2001
Creator: BERG,J.S.; JOHNSTONE,C. & SUMMERS,D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of sin {sup 2}{Theta}{sub W} at the First Muon Collider

Description: This report summarizes the study of the possibility of measuring sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} using the intense neutrino beam expected from the straight sections of the First Muon Collider ring. This study is based on realistic error calculations from the CCFR and the NuTeV experiments. Using a neutrino detector that is capable of identifying and distinguishing electrons and muons, along with a light isoscalar target, it is conceivable to measure sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} to the precision equivalent to the W mass uncertainty (experimental) of 30 MeV.
Date: January 1, 1998
Creator: Yu, J. & Kotwal, A.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neutrino oscillation physics with BooNE

Description: A proposal was submitted to Fermilab for a Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE) to confirm the discovery of neutrino oscillations at LANL using a Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND). The location of the experiment at the Fermilab Booster will provide for higher signal rates than were possible at LSND by about an order of magnitude. BooNE will also provide an opportunity for observing the signal under very different conditions and with different systematics than were present at LSND. The muon collider will provide an opportunity to further explore this region of parameter space with a different set of systematics. Most important will be that the neutrino flux will be accurately known, since the current of the parent muon beam can be measured very precisely. This source will provide a and flux equal in magnitude and with easily calculable energy and spatial distributions.
Date: April 1, 1998
Creator: Stefanski, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Muon Collider Overview: Progress and Future Plans

Description: Besides continued work on the parameters of a 3-4 and 0.5 TeV center of mass (COM) collider, many studies are now concentrating on a machine near 100 GeV (COM) that could be a factory for the s-channel production of Higgs particles. We mention the research on the various com- ponents in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate pions from a heavy-Z tar- get and proceeding through the phase rotation and decay ({pi}{yields}{mu}{nu}<sub>{mu}</sub>) channel, muon cooling, acceleration storage in a collider ring and the collider detector. We also men- tion theoretical and experimental R & D plans for the next several years that should lead to a better understanding of the design and feasibility issues for all of the components. This note is a summary of a report[l] updating the progress on the R & D since the Feasibility Study of Muon Colliders presented at the Workshop Snowmass'96.[2]
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Gallardo, J.; Palmer, R.; Sessler, A. & Tollestrup, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Possible demonstration of ionization cooling using absorbers in a solenoidal field

Description: Ionization cooling may play an important role in reducing the phase space volume of muons for a future muon-muon collider. We describe a possible experiment to demonstrate transverse emittance cooling using a muon beam at the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The experiment uses device dimensions and parameters and beam conditions similar to what is expected in an actual muon-muon collider.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Fernow, R.C.; Gallardo, J.C. & Kirk, H.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Intense muon beams and neutrino factories

Description: High intensity muon sources are needed in exploring neutrino factories, lepton flavor violating muon processes, and lower energy experiments as the stepping phase towards building higher energy {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders. We present a brief overview, sketch of a neutrino source, and an example of a muon storage ring at BNL with detector(s) at Fermilab, Sudan, etc. Physics with low energy neutrino beams based on muon storage rings ({mu}SR) and conventional Horn Facilities are described and compared. CP violation Asymmetries and a new Statistical Figure of Merit to be used for comparison is given. Improvements in the sensitivity of low energy experiments to study Flavor changing neutral currents are also included.
Date: October 5, 2000
Creator: Parsa, Z.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility Study of Compact Gas-Filled Storage Ring for 6D Cooling of Muon Beams

Description: The future of elementary particle physics in the USA depends in part on the development of new machines such as the International Linear Collider, Muon Collider and Neutrino Factories which can produce particle beams of higher energy, intensity, or particle type than now exists. These beams will enable the continued exploration of the world of elementary particles and interactions. In addition, the associated development of new technologies and machines such as a Muon Ring Cooler is essential. This project was to undertake a feasibility study of a compact gas-filled storage ring for 6D cooling of muon beams. The ultimate goal, in Phase III, was to build, test, and operate a demonstration storage ring. The preferred lattice for the storage ring was determined and dynamic simulations of particles through the lattice were performed. A conceptual design and drawing of the magnets were made and a study of the RF cavity and possible injection/ejection scheme made. Commercial applications for the device were investigated and the writing of the Phase II proposal completed. The research findings conclude that a compact gas-filled storage ring for 6D cooling of muon beams is possible with further research and development.
Date: October 31, 2005
Creator: Garren, A. & Kolonlo, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders

Description: Muon collider luminosity depends on the number of muons in the storage ring and on the transverse size of the beams in collision. Ionization cooling as it is currently envisioned will not cool the beam sizes sufficiently well to provide adequate luminosity without large muon intensities. Six-dimensional cooling schemes will reduce the longitudinal emittance of a muon beam so that smaller high frequency RF cavities can be used for later stages of cooling and for acceleration. However, the bunch length at collision energy is then shorter than needed to match the interaction region beta function. New ideas to shrink transverse beam dimensions by lengthening each bunch will help achieve high luminosity in muon colliders. Analytic expressions for the reverse emittance exchange mechanism were derived, including a new resonant method of beam focusing.
Date: May 1, 2009
Creator: V. Ivanov, A. Afanasev, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, G.M. Wang, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Mechanical and Thermal Design for the MICE Detector SolenoidMagnet System

Description: The detector solenoid for MICE surrounds a scintillating fiber tracker that is used to analyze the muon beam within the detector. There are two detector magnets for measuring the beam emittance entering and leaving the cooling channel that forms the central part of the experiment. The field in the region of the fiber detectors must be from 2.8 to 4 T and uniform to better than 1 percent over a volume that is 300 mm in diameter by 1000 mm long. The portion of the detector magnet that is around the uniform field section of the magnet consists of two short end coils and a long center coil. In addition, in the direction of the MICE cooling channel, there are two additional coils that are used to match the muon beam in the cooling channel to the beam required for the detectors. Each detector magnet module, with its five coils, will have a design stored-energy of about 4 MJ. Each detector magnet is designed to be cooled using three 1.5 W coolers. This report presents the mechanical and electrical parameters for the detector magnet system.
Date: September 26, 2004
Creator: Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Perrella, M.; Bravar, U. & Green,M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Design Parameters for the MICE Tracker Solenoid

Description: The first superconducting magnets to be installed in the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) will be the tracker solenoids. The tracker solenoid module is a five coil superconducting solenoid with a 400 mm diameter warm bore that is used to provide a 4 T magnetic field for the experiment tracker module. Three of the coils are used to produce a uniform field (up to 4 T with better than 1 percent uniformity) in a region that is 300 mm in diameter and 1000 mm long. The other two coils are used to match the muon beam into the MICE cooling channel. Two 2.94-meter long superconducting tracker solenoid modules have been ordered for MICE. The tracker solenoid will be cooled using two-coolers that produce 1.5 W each at 4.2 K. The magnet system is described. The decisions that drive the magnet design will be discussed in this report.
Date: August 20, 2006
Creator: Green, Michael A.; Chen, C.Y.; Juang, Tiki; Lau, Wing W.; Taylor,Clyde; Virostek, Steve P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress on the MICE Liquid Absorber Cooling and CryogenicDistribution System

Description: This report describes the progress made on the design of the cryogenic cooling system for the liquid absorber for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). The absorber consists of a 20.7-liter vessel that contains liquid hydrogen (1.48 kg at 20.3 K) or liquid helium (2.59 kg at 4.2 K). The liquid cryogen vessel is located within the warm bore of the focusing magnet for the MICE. The purpose of the magnet is to provide a low beam beta region within the absorber. For safety reasons, the vacuum vessel for the hydrogen absorber is separated from the vacuum vessel for the superconducting magnet and the vacuum that surrounds the RF cavities or the detector. The absorber thin windows separate the liquid in the absorber from the absorber vacuum. The absorber vacuum vessel also has thin windows that separate the absorber vacuum space from adjacent vacuum spaces. Because the muon beam in MICE is of low intensity, there is no beam heating in the absorber. The absorber can use a single 4 K cooler to cool either liquid helium or liquid hydrogen within the absorber.
Date: May 13, 2005
Creator: Green, M.A.; Baynham, E.; Bradshaw, T.; Drumm, P.; Ivanyushenkov,Y.; Ishimoto, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress on the MICE Tracker Solenoid

Description: This report describes the 400 mm warm bore tracker solenoid for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). The 2.923 m long tracker solenoid module includes the radiation shutter between the end absorber focus coil modules and the tracker as well as the 2.735 m long magnet cryostat vacuum vessel. The 2.554 m long tracker solenoid cold mass consists of two sections, a three-coil spectrometer magnet and a two-coil matching section that matches the uniform field 4 T spectrometer solenoid into the MICE cooling channel. The two tracker magnets are used to provide a uniform magnetic field for the fiber detectors that are used to measure the muon beam emittance at the two ends of the cooling channel. This paper describes the design for the tracker magnet coils and the 4.2 K cryogenic coolers that are used to cool the superconducting magnet. Interfaces between the magnet and the detectors are discussed.
Date: June 10, 2006
Creator: Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.; Lau, W. & Yang, Stephanie Q.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fabrication and test of short helical solenoid model based on YBCO tape

Description: A helical cooling channel (HCC) is a new technique proposed for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams. To achieve the optimal cooling rate, the high field section of HCC need to be developed, which suggests using High Temperature Superconductors (HTS). This paper updates the parameters of a YBCO based helical solenoid (HS) model, describes the fabrication of HS segments (double-pancake units) and the assembly of six-coil short HS model with two dummy cavity insertions. Three HS segments and the six-coil short model were tested. The results are presented and discussed.
Date: March 1, 2011
Creator: Yu, M.; Lombardo, V.; Lopes, M. L.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A. V.; Flanagan, G. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Far Future Colliders and Required R&D Program

Description: Particle colliders for high energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the collider has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size and the cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but its pace of progress has greatly slowed down. In this paper we very briefly review the R&amp;D toward near future colliders and make an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and outline the changes in the paradigm required for the next breakthroughs.
Date: June 1, 2012
Creator: Shiltsev, V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Novel Muon Beam Facilities for Project X at Fermilab

Description: Innovative muon beam concepts for intensity-frontier experiments such as muon-to-electron conversion are described. Elaborating upon a previous single-beam idea, we have developed a design concept for a system to generate four high quality, low-energy muon beams (two of each sign) from a single beam of protons. As a first step, the production of pions by 1 and 3 GeV protons from the proposed Project X linac at Fermilab is being simulated and compared with the 8-GeV results from the previous study.
Date: May 1, 2012
Creator: Neuffer, D.V.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Abrams, R.; Roberts, T.J.; Yoshikawa, C.Y. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Initial Configuration of Acceleration for the IDS-NF Neutrino Factory

Description: The IDS-NF neutrino factory acceleration system must accelerate the muon beam coming out of cooling to a total energy of 25 GeV. The parameters of the beam being accelerated are given in Table 1. While a certain fraction of the beam will be lost early in acceleration, losses of the beam that falls within the acceptance (see Table 1) should be dominated by decay losses (as opposed to dynamic losses or losses on apertures). Decay losses will be kept small, and the cost of the machine will be reduced to the extent possible, consistent with the above requirements. There is a tradeoff between machine cost and the amount of decay losses, and a reasonable compromise will be made between them. Both muon signs will be accelerated simultaneously.
Date: October 1, 2011
Creator: Berg, J.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department