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High efficiency muon beam

Description: Aspects of muon beams pertinent to the establishment of an effective nucleon structure facility are discussed and a preliminary design for such a beam at NAL is advanced. The optical properties, duty factor and proton beam source are already able to be sharply specified, but the pion and muon transports need more work to be optimal. It is already clear, however, that efficiency gains of at least 20 can be made and probably- factors of 50 or even 100 are not impossible. Beam/halo ratios can probably be raised to 14: 1 with proper spoilers. Most important of all, the effective beam time can be raised an order of magnitude over present prospects by establishing a separate source of protons for a muon beam by means of a split or pulsed switch in the present neutrino beam time. (auth)
Date: September 1, 1973
Creator: Kirk, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

50x50 GeV Muon Collider Beam Collimation

Description: A summary of different techniques and systems to scrape beam halo in a 50 x 50 GeV {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider is presented. Such systems are installed in a special utility section with optics specifically designed to meet both the requirements of the scraping system and of injection. Results froma realistic Monte Carlo simulation (STRUCT-MARS) show that a system consisting of steel absorbers several meters in length suppresses halo-induced backgrounds in the collider detector by more than three orders of magnitude. The heat load in superconducting magnets near the scraper system can be reduced to tolerable levels by appropriate collimator design and location. This reduction applies to both injection and collider mode of operation. Also discussed is extraction of halo particles using electrostatic deflectors and bent crys-tals, although neither appears to be effective for a muon collider at this energy.
Date: April 14, 1999
Creator: Drozhdin, A. I.; Johnstone, C. J.; Mokhov, N. V.; Garen, A. A. & Biryukov, V. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An ionization cooling channel for muon beams based on alternating solenoids

Description: The muon collider requires intense, cooled muon bunches to reach the required luminosity. Due to the limited life-time of the muon, the cooling process must take place very rapidly. Ionization cooling seems to be our only option, given the large emittances of the muon beam from pion decay. However, this ionization cooling method has been found quite difficult to implement in practice. We describe a scheme based on the use of liquid hydrogen absorbers fol-lowed by r.f. cavities (�pillbox� or �open iris� type), em-bedded in a transport lattice based on high field solenoids. These solenoidal fields are reversed periodically in order to suppress the growth of the canonical angular momentum. This channel has been simulated in detail with independent codes, featuring conventional tracking in e.m. fields and de-tailed simulation of multiple scattering and straggling in the the absorbers and windows. These calculations show that the 15 Tesla lattice cools in 6-Dphase space by a factor {approx} 2 over a distance of 20 m.
Date: April 16, 1999
Creator: al., Juan C. Gallardo et
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ACCELERATION FOR A HIGH ENERGY MUON COLLIDER

Description: The authors describe a method for designing the acceleration systems for a muon collider, with particular application and examples for a high energy muon collider. This paper primarily concentrates on design considerations coming from longitudinal motion, but some transverse issues are briefly discussed.
Date: April 7, 2000
Creator: BERG,J.S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DOGBONE GEOMETRY FOR RECIRCULATING ACCELERATORS.

Description: Most scenarios for accelerating muons require recirculating acceleration. A racetrack shape for the accelerator requires particles with lower energy in early passes to traverse almost the same length of arc as particles with the highest energy. This extra arc length may lead to excess decays and excess cost. Changing the geometry to a dogbone shape, where there is a single linac and the beam turns completely around at the end of the linac, returning to the same end of the linac from which it exited, addresses this problem. In this design, the arc lengths can be proportional to the particle's momentum. This paper proposes an approximate cost model for a recirculating accelerator, attempts to make cost-optimized designs for both racetrack and dogbone geometries, and demonstrates that the dogbone geometry does appear to be more cost effective.
Date: June 18, 2001
Creator: BERG,J.S.; JOHNSTONE,C. & SUMMERS,D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of sin {sup 2}{Theta}{sub W} at the First Muon Collider

Description: This report summarizes the study of the possibility of measuring sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} using the intense neutrino beam expected from the straight sections of the First Muon Collider ring. This study is based on realistic error calculations from the CCFR and the NuTeV experiments. Using a neutrino detector that is capable of identifying and distinguishing electrons and muons, along with a light isoscalar target, it is conceivable to measure sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} to the precision equivalent to the W mass uncertainty (experimental) of 30 MeV.
Date: January 1, 1998
Creator: Yu, J. & Kotwal, A.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neutrino oscillation physics with BooNE

Description: A proposal was submitted to Fermilab for a Booster Neutrino Experiment (BooNE) to confirm the discovery of neutrino oscillations at LANL using a Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND). The location of the experiment at the Fermilab Booster will provide for higher signal rates than were possible at LSND by about an order of magnitude. BooNE will also provide an opportunity for observing the signal under very different conditions and with different systematics than were present at LSND. The muon collider will provide an opportunity to further explore this region of parameter space with a different set of systematics. Most important will be that the neutrino flux will be accurately known, since the current of the parent muon beam can be measured very precisely. This source will provide a and flux equal in magnitude and with easily calculable energy and spatial distributions.
Date: April 1, 1998
Creator: Stefanski, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Muon Collider Overview: Progress and Future Plans

Description: Besides continued work on the parameters of a 3-4 and 0.5 TeV center of mass (COM) collider, many studies are now concentrating on a machine near 100 GeV (COM) that could be a factory for the s-channel production of Higgs particles. We mention the research on the various com- ponents in such muon colliders, starting from the proton accelerator needed to generate pions from a heavy-Z tar- get and proceeding through the phase rotation and decay ({pi}{yields}{mu}{nu}<sub>{mu}</sub>) channel, muon cooling, acceleration storage in a collider ring and the collider detector. We also men- tion theoretical and experimental R & D plans for the next several years that should lead to a better understanding of the design and feasibility issues for all of the components. This note is a summary of a report[l] updating the progress on the R & D since the Feasibility Study of Muon Colliders presented at the Workshop Snowmass'96.[2]
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Gallardo, J.; Palmer, R.; Sessler, A. & Tollestrup, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Possible demonstration of ionization cooling using absorbers in a solenoidal field

Description: Ionization cooling may play an important role in reducing the phase space volume of muons for a future muon-muon collider. We describe a possible experiment to demonstrate transverse emittance cooling using a muon beam at the AGS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The experiment uses device dimensions and parameters and beam conditions similar to what is expected in an actual muon-muon collider.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Fernow, R.C.; Gallardo, J.C. & Kirk, H.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Intense muon beams and neutrino factories

Description: High intensity muon sources are needed in exploring neutrino factories, lepton flavor violating muon processes, and lower energy experiments as the stepping phase towards building higher energy {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} colliders. We present a brief overview, sketch of a neutrino source, and an example of a muon storage ring at BNL with detector(s) at Fermilab, Sudan, etc. Physics with low energy neutrino beams based on muon storage rings ({mu}SR) and conventional Horn Facilities are described and compared. CP violation Asymmetries and a new Statistical Figure of Merit to be used for comparison is given. Improvements in the sensitivity of low energy experiments to study Flavor changing neutral currents are also included.
Date: October 5, 2000
Creator: Parsa, Z.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations

Description: Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.
Date: July 1, 2012
Creator: C. Y. Yoshikawa, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov, D.V. Neuffer, K. Yonehara
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations

Description: Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.
Date: May 1, 2012
Creator: Neuffer, D.V.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Johnson, R.P.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Feasibility Study of Compact Gas-Filled Storage Ring for 6D Cooling of Muon Beams

Description: The future of elementary particle physics in the USA depends in part on the development of new machines such as the International Linear Collider, Muon Collider and Neutrino Factories which can produce particle beams of higher energy, intensity, or particle type than now exists. These beams will enable the continued exploration of the world of elementary particles and interactions. In addition, the associated development of new technologies and machines such as a Muon Ring Cooler is essential. This project was to undertake a feasibility study of a compact gas-filled storage ring for 6D cooling of muon beams. The ultimate goal, in Phase III, was to build, test, and operate a demonstration storage ring. The preferred lattice for the storage ring was determined and dynamic simulations of particles through the lattice were performed. A conceptual design and drawing of the magnets were made and a study of the RF cavity and possible injection/ejection scheme made. Commercial applications for the device were investigated and the writing of the Phase II proposal completed. The research findings conclude that a compact gas-filled storage ring for 6D cooling of muon beams is possible with further research and development.
Date: October 31, 2005
Creator: Garren, A. & Kolonlo, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FIXED FIELD ALTERNATING GRADIENT LATTICE DESIGN WITHOUT OPPOSITE BEND.

Description: This report presents an attempt of the lattice design with a fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) magnets without the usual opposite bends. It should allow particle acceleration through a small aperture. An example was made for the muon beam acceleration in an energy range 10-20 GeV with distributed RF cavities. The dispersion function for the central energy of 15 GeV has maximum value of the order of 7 cm. The lattice is composed of a combined function elements and sextupoles. We present the magnet configuration, orbit, chromaticities, tunes, and betatron function dependence on momentum (energies) during acceleration. For the lattice design we used SYNCH an MAD programs. For these large momentum offsets {delta}p/p = +-33% we found discrepancies between analytical and codes' results. This will be corrected in the new versions of codes (MAD-X). Because of uncertainties of the programs MAD and SYNCH some details of the presented results might not be correct.
Date: June 2, 2002
Creator: TRBOJEVIC,D.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; COURANT,E.D. & GARREN,A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Target and collection optimization for muon colliders

Description: To achieve adequate luminosity in a muon collider it is necessary to produce and collect large numbers of muons. The basic method used in this paper follows closely a proposed scheme which starts with a proton beam impinging on a thick target ({approximately} one interaction length) followed by a long solenoid which collects muons resulting mainly from pion decay. Production and collection of pions and their decay muons must be optimized while keeping in mind limitations of target integrity and of the technology of magnets and cavities. Results of extensive simulations for 8 GeV protons on various targets and with various collection schemes are reported. Besides muon yields results include-energy deposition in target and solenoid to address cooling requirements for these systems. Target composition, diameter, and length are varied in this study as well as the configuration and field strengths of the solenoid channel. A curved solenoid field is introduced to separate positive and negative pions within a few meters of the target. This permits each to be placed in separate RF buckets for acceleration which effectively doubles the number of muons per bunch available for collisions and increases the luminosity fourfold.
Date: January 10, 1996
Creator: Mokhov, N.V.; Noble, R.J. & Van Ginneken, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1-GeV Linac Upgrade Study at Fermilab

Description: A linac injector for a new proton source complex at Fermilab is assumed to have a kinetic energy of 1 GeV. This linac would be sized to accelerate 100 mA of H{sup -} beam in a 200 microsecond pulse at a 15 Hz repetition rate. This would be adequate to produce {approximately}10{sup 14} protons per pulse allowing for future improvements of the new proton source complex. An alternate proposal is to add 600 MeV of side coupled cavity linac at 805 MHz to the existing 400 MeV Linac. This addition may either be in a new location or use the present Booster tunnel. A discussion of these possibilities will be given.
Date: September 1998
Creator: Popovic, M.; Moretti, A.; Noble, R. & Schmidt, C. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Center for Beam Physics papers

Description: Six papers are included in this collection. They cover: a second interaction region for gamma-gamma, gamma-electron and electron- electron collisions; constraints on laser-driven accelerators for a high-energy linear collider; progress on the design of a high luminosity muon-muon collider; RF power source development at the RTA test facility; sensitivity studies of crystalline beams; and single bunch collective effects in muon colliders.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Sessler, A.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ring cooler for muon collider

Description: The possibilities of a ring cooler stage in a muon collider are explored. A basic design is examined both with analytic calculations and simulation of the evolution of beam phase space.
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Balbekov, V.I. & Van Ginneken, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Transverse cooling in the muon collider

Description: Ionization cooling is the preferred method for reducing the emittance of muon beams in a muon collider. The method described here uses passive liquid hydrogen absorbers and rf acceleration in an alternating lattice of solenoids. The authors consider the basic principles of ionization cooling, indicating the reasons for selecting various parameters. Tracking simulations are used to make detailed examinations of effects on the beam, such as transmission losses, transverse cooling, bunch lengthening, and introduction of energy spread. The system reduces the overall 6-dimensional emittance to 44% of its initial value.
Date: July 1, 1998
Creator: Fernow, R.C.; Gallardo, J.C.; Kirk, H.G. & Palmer, R.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High intensity muon storage rings for neutrino production: Lattice design

Description: Five energies, 250, 100, 50, 20, and 10 GeV, have been explored in the design of a muon storage ring for neutrino-beam production. The ring design incorporates exceptionally long straight sections with large beta functions in order to produce an intense, parallel neutrino beam via muon decay. To emphasize compactness and reduce the number of muon decays in the arcs, high-field superconducting dipoles are used in the arc design.
Date: May 1, 1998
Creator: Johnstone, C>
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Testing technicolor with scalars at the first muon collider

Description: An interesting class of models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking allows only the third generation fermions to acquire dynamical masses, such that the masses of the first two generations should be given by coupling to a nonstandard ``Higgs`` doublet. The scalars in this case have large couplings to the second generation, so that they are copiously produced at a muon collider. We analyze the potential for discovery of the neutral scalars in the s-channel, and we show that at resonance there will be observed in excess of 10{sup 5} events per year.
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Dobrescu, B.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department