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MAG-GATE System for Molten metal Flow Control

Description: The need for improved active flow control has been recognized as part of the Steel Industry Technology Roadmap. Under TRP 9808 for the American Iron and Steel Institute and the Department of Energy, Concept Engineering Group Inc. has developed MAG-GATE{trademark}, an electromagnetic system for active molten metal flow control. Two hot steel tests were successfully conducted in 2003 at the Whemco Foundry Division, Midland, PA. Approximately 110,000 pounds of 0.2% carbon steel were poured through the device subject to electromagnetic flow control. Excellent agreement between predicted and actual flow control was found. A survey of the molten metal flow control practices at 100 continuous casters in North America was also conducted in 2003. This report summarizes the results of the development program to date. Preliminary designs are described for the next step of a beta test at an operating billet/bloom or slab caster.
Date: May 15, 2004
Creator: Nathenson, Richard D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of the Incentives, Disincentives, and Alternatives for Steel Industry CO2 Reduction

Description: This report presents the results of the third element of a trilogy of studies sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies on the consumption of energy and the emissions of carbon dioxide in the U.S. steel industry
Date: April 16, 2002
Creator: Leuchte, Paul T.; Stubbles, DR. John & Fruehan, Professor
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy use in the U.S. steel industry: a historical perspective and future opportunities

Description: The U.S. steel industry has taken enormous strides over the past decades to reduce its energy consumption; since the end of World War II, the industry has reduced its energy intensity (energy use per shipped ton) by 60 percent. Between 1990 and 1998 alone, intensity has dropped from 20 to 18 million Btu (MBtu) per ton. This figure is projected to decrease to 15 MBtu/ton by 2010 with an asymptotic trend towards 14 MBtu/ton. Domestic shipments are projected to flatten out over the next decade to around 105 million tons which means that total energy consumption will also decrease. Historically, the steel industry has accounted for about 6 percent of U.S. energy consumption. Today, that figure is less than 2 percent and will decrease further to 1.5 percent by 2010. The primary causes for the decrease in energy consumption since WWII are: The use of pellets in the blast furnace and the application of new technology in the ironmaking process to further reduce fuel rates per net ton of hot metal (NTHM); The total replacement of the open hearth process by basic oxygen and electric furnaces; The almost total replacement of ingot casting by continuous casting (which improved yield dramatically and thus reduced the tons of raw steel required per ton of shipments); and The growth of the electric furnace sector of the industry at the expense of hot metal-based processes (which has also stimulated scrap recycling so that about 55 percent of ''new'' steel is now melted from scrap steel). This report focuses on the concept of good practices (i.e., those that are sustainable and can use today's technology). If all the industry could operate on this basis, the additional savings per ton could total 2 MBtu, As further restructuring occurs and the swing from hot metal-based to electric ...
Date: September 1, 2000
Creator: Stubbles, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Phase II Calderon Process to Produce Direct Reduced Iron Research and Development Project

Description: This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.
Date: June 30, 2003
Creator: Calderon, Albert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of Submerged Entry Nozzles that Resist Clogging

Description: Accretion formation and the associated clogging of SENs is a major problem for the steel industry leading to decreased strand speed, premature changing of SENs or strand termination and the associated reductions in productivity, consistency, and steel quality. A program to evaluate potentially clog resistance materials was initiated at the University of Missouri-Rolla. The main objective of the research effort was to identify combinations of steelmaking and refractory practices that would yield improved accretion resistance for tundish nozzles and submerged entry nozzles. A number of tasks were identified during the initial kick-off meeting and each was completed with two exceptions, the thermal shock validation and the industrial trials. Not completing these two tasks related to not having access to industrial scale production facilities. Though much of the results and information generated in the project is of proprietary nature.
Date: October 14, 2002
Creator: Smith, Dr. Jeffrey D. & Peasle, Kent D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

Description: This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.
Date: July 30, 2002
Creator: Calderon, Albert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Metalcasting competitiveness research. Final report

Description: This report comprises eleven separate reports: prediction of non- metallic particle distribution, electromagnetic separation of inclusions from molten Al alloy, clean steel castings, waste stream identification and treatment, elastic wave lithotripsy for removal of ceramic from investment castings, metal penetration in sand molds, mold-metal interface gas composition, improved Alloy 718, specifications for iron oxide additions to no-bake sands, criteria functions for defect prediction, and computer-aided cooling curve analysis.
Date: August 1, 1994
Creator: Piwonka, T.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Metal Casting Research Institute final report. Volume 2, Die casting research

Description: Four subprojects were completed: development and evaluation of die coatings, accelerated die life characterization of die materials, evaluation of fluid flow and solidification modeling programs, selection and characterization of Al-based die casting alloys, and influence of die materials and coatings on die casting quality.
Date: June 1, 1994
Creator: Jensen, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Metal casting industry of the future: An integrated approach to delivering energy efficiency products and services

Description: The Industries of the Future process is driven by industry. Through technology roadmaps, industry participants set technology priorities, assess the progress of R and D, and ultimately lead the way in applying research results. This approach to private-public partnerships ensures the most strategic allocation possible of limited resources for the development of new technologies and the enhancement of industrial processes. Based on industry`s request, OIT`s role is to help facilitate the Industries of the Future strategy and to support the development and deployment of technologies that will shape the future of the metal casting industry. Part of this role is to encourage industry to undertake long-term, sector-wide technology planning and to selectively cost-share with OIT in collaborative R and D activities that match OIT`s mission. OIT metal casting research requires a dollar for dollar industry cost share.
Date: December 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved life of die casting dies of H13 steel by attaining improved mechanical properties and distortion control during heat treatment. Year 1 report, October 1994--September 1995

Description: Optimum heat treatment of dies (quenching) is critical in ensuring satisfactory service performance: rapid cooling rates increase the thermal fatigue/heat checking resistance of the steel, although very fast cooling rates can also lead to distortion and lower fracture toughness, increasing the danger of catastrophic fracture. Goal of this project is to increase die life by using fast enough quenching rates (> 30 F/min ave cooling rate from 1750 to 550 F, 1/2 in. below working surfaces) to obtain good toughness and fatigue resistance in Premium grade H-13 steel dies. An iterative approach of computer modeling validated by experiment was taken. Cooling curves during gas quenching of H-13 blocks and die shapes were measured under 2, 5, and 7.5 bar N2 and 4 bar Ar. Resulting dimensional changes and residual stresses were determined. To facilitate the computer modeling work, a database of H-13 mechanical and physical properties was compiled. Finite element analysis of the heat treated shapes was conducted. Good fit of modeled vs measured quenched rates was demonstrated for simple die shapes. The models predict well the phase transformation products from the quench. There is good fit between predicted and measured distortion contours; however magnitude of predicted distortion and residual stresses does not match well the measured values. Further fine tuning of the model is required.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Wallace, J.F. & Schwam, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmentally conscious manufacturing & technology access project: Final technical progress report, April 1, 1994--September 30, 1996

Description: This final report is being submitted in fulfillment of the management obligations associated with the TRP/DOE grant which funded the Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing & Technology Access (ECM) Project. A {open_quotes}Federal Assistance Project Status Report{close_quotes} is also being submitted with this form. This report will elaborate on the successful completion of this project in achieving and in most cases exceeding its programmatic goals and fulfilling it statutory financial match obligation. A review of the Year 1 {open_quotes}Technical Progress Report{close_quotes} and the Quarterly Reports filed during the project period, clearly portray that, in all substantive areas, the Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing & Technology Access Project (ECM Project) achieved or exceeded its goals. The success of the Project is largely due to the tremendous support provided by the Center for Technology Transfer (CTT) and the Maine Metal Products Association (MMPA). Both organizations provided extensive administrative and financial support and were instrumental in promoting the work of the project within the metals industry. The programmatic oversight provided by the industry Steering Committee and the broad partnership represented on the Board of Advisors were invaluable in developing, promoting and implementing the work of the ECM Project.
Date: May 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling atmospheric deposition using a stochastic transport model

Description: An advanced stochastic transport model has been modified to include the removal mechanisms of dry and wet deposition. Time-dependent wind and turbulence fields are generated with a prognostic mesoscale numerical model and are used to advect and disperse individually released particles that are each assigned a mass. These particles are subjected to mass reduction in two ways depending on their physical location. Particles near the surface experience a decrease in mass using the concept of a dry deposition velocity, while the mass of particles located within areas of precipitation are depleted using a scavenging coefficient. Two levels of complexity are incorporated into the particle model. The simple case assumes constant values of dry deposition velocity and scavenging coefficient, while the more complex case varies the values according to meteorology, surface conditions, release material, and precipitation intensity. Instantaneous and cumulative dry and wet deposition are determined from the mass loss due to these physical mechanisms. A useful means of validating the model results is with data available from a recent accidental release of Cesium-137 from a steel-processing furnace in Algeciras, Spain in May, 1998. This paper describes the deposition modeling technique, as well as a comparison of simulated concentration and deposition with measurements taken for the Algeciras release.
Date: December 17, 1999
Creator: Buckley, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

Description: This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron (hot metal) consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work which is labeled as Phase II will take place at two levels; namely, the bench scale level and the process development unit (PDU) level. The bench scale work is being divided into two parts; the construction and operation of Bench Scale No.1 to make hot metal direct as one part and the construction and operation of Bench Scale No.2 to make DRI with its conversion to hot metal as the second part. The work at the PDU consists of getting the PDU which exists ready for advancing the activities from bench scale to PDU level.
Date: October 24, 2001
Creator: Calderon, Albert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory experiments on arc deflection and instability

Description: This article describes experiments on arc deflection instability carried out during the past few years at the Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The approach has been that of plasma physicists interested in arcs, but they believe these results may be useful to engineers who are responsible for controlling arc behavior in large electric steel furnaces.
Date: March 21, 2000
Creator: Zweben, S. & Karasik, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced lost foam casting quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

Description: Objective is to advance the state of the art in lost foam casting technology, in order to improve the competitiveness of the US metals casting industries. The following tasks are reported on pyrolysis defects and sand distortion, bronze casting technology, steel casting technology, sand filling and compaction, coating technology, precision pattern production, and computational modeling.
Date: December 31, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

Description: This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron (hot metal) consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work which is labeled as Phase II will take place at two levels; namely, the bench scale level and the process development unit level. During the past quarter approval for the re-direction took place and work was initiated at both levels.
Date: July 23, 2001
Creator: Calderon, Albert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alkaline detergent recycling via ultrafiltration

Description: The metal finishing industry uses alkaline cleaners and detergents to remove oils and dirt from manufactured parts, often before they are painted or plated. The use of these cleaners has grown because environmental regulations are phasing out ozone depleting substances and placing restrictions on the use and disposal of many hazardous solvents. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is examining ultrafiltration as a cleaning approach that reclaims the cleaning solutions and minimizes wastes. The ultrafiltration membrane is made from sheets of polymerized organic film. The sheets are rolled onto a supporting frame and installed in a tube. Spent cleaning solution is pumped into a filter chamber and filtered through the membrane that captures oils and dirt and allows water and detergent to pass. The membrane is monitored and when pressure builds from oil and dirt, an automatic system cleans the surface to maintain solution flow and filtration quality. The results show that the ultrafiltration does not disturb the detergent concentration or alkalinity but removed almost all the oils and dirt leaving the solution in condition to be reused.
Date: June 1, 1995
Creator: Steffani, C. & Meltzer, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NOVEL BINDERS AND METHODS FOR AGGLOMERATION OF ORE

Description: Many metal extraction operations, such as leaching of copper, leaching of precious metals, and reduction of metal oxides to metal in high-temperature furnaces, require agglomeration of ore to ensure that reactive liquids or gases are evenly distributed throughout the ore being processed. Agglomeration of ore into coarse, porous masses achieves this even distribution of fluids by preventing fine particles from migrating and clogging the spaces and channels between the larger ore particles. Binders are critically necessary to produce agglomerates that will not break down during processing. However, for many important metal extraction processes there are no binders known that will work satisfactorily. Primary examples of this are copper heap leaching, where there are no binders that will work in the acidic environment encountered in this process, and advanced ironmaking processes, where binders must function satisfactorily over an extraordinarily large range of temperatures (from room temperature up to over 1200 C). As a result, operators of many facilities see a large loss of process efficiency due to their inability to take advantage of agglomeration. The large quantities of ore that must be handled in metal extraction processes also means that the binder must be inexpensive and useful at low dosages to be economical. The acid-resistant binders and agglomeration procedures developed in this project will also be adapted for use in improving the energy efficiency and performance of a broad range of mineral agglomeration applications, particularly heap leaching and advanced primary ironmaking.
Date: April 1, 2004
Creator: Kawatra, S. K.; Eisele, T. C.; Gurtler, J. A.; Hardison, C. A. & Lewandowski, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

SMA DOE Student Fellowship Initiative

Description: Steel companies in many areas of the country have found it increasingly difficult to attract talented recent graduates of college and university engineering and applied science programs to the Electric Arc Furnace iron & steel industry. College student involvement in co-operative programs at steel companies can attract needed talent to the industry. Additionally, certain R & D needs identified in the Steel Industry Technology Roadmap are addressed as co-operative program activities. The Steel Manufacturers Association (''SMA'') therefore established a co-operative education program for selected college students who have completed the first or second year of a four or five-year college program, to be recognized as SMA Co-Operative Fellows, in regard to their summer and fall semester projects with SMA's member companies.
Date: December 24, 2004
Creator: Association, Steel Manufacturers
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

Description: This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.
Date: January 28, 2003
Creator: Calderon, Albert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

Description: This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.
Date: October 29, 2002
Creator: Calderon, Albert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

Description: This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.
Date: April 28, 2003
Creator: Calderon, Albert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

Description: This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron (hot metal) consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work which is labeled as Phase II will take place at two levels; namely, the bench scale level and the process development unit (PDU) level.
Date: January 22, 2002
Creator: Calderon, Albert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department