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Development of a Workbook for Business Mathematics Based on the Needs of Students of Business at North Texas State Teachers College

Description: The problem of this study is to determine the needs of students who are majoring in business and to design a workbook that will best prepare these students for the business courses offered at North Texas State Teachers College and for the problems of everyday life.
Date: 1947
Creator: Williams, Walter Maxey
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effectiveness of a Guided Discovery Method of Teaching in a College Mathematics Course for Non-Mathematics and Non-Science Majors

Description: The purpose of this study was to ascertain the value, as determined by student achievement, of using a discovery method of teaching mathematics in a college freshman mathematics course for non-mathematics and non-science majors.
Date: January 1969
Creator: Reimer, Dennis D., 1940-
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Comparison of an Inductive and a Deductive Procedure of Teaching in a College Mathematics Course for Prospective Elementary Teachers

Description: To obtain information regarding the effects of two divergent thought processes used in a college mathematics course for prospective elementary school teachers, this study compared the effectiveness of an adaptation of the traditional, deductive teaching method with that of an inductive method reflecting the recommendations of the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics. In the spring semester of 1973, two sections of Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I, at Cameron College, Lawton, Oklahoma, served as experimental groups to test the two adaptations. The course followed the Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics recommendations for a first course in mathematics for prospective elementary teachers.
Date: December 1973
Creator: Morris, James Kent
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Effect of Teaching Beginning College Mathematics by Television

Description: The purposes of this study were (1) to compare the achievement levels of students enrolled in a beginning college mathematics course when taught by (a) closed-circuit television followed by student-assisted study periods, (b) closed circuit television followed by access to videotape replay with no supervised study periods, (c) closed-circuit television followed by unsupervised study and discussion, and (d) regular lecture-recitation methods conducted by the television instructor, and (2) to ascertain the students' attitudes toward their instructor, course, and method of instruction.
Date: August 1970
Creator: Backens, Vern W. (Vern William)
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of the Effectiveness of Supplemental Instruction on Developmental Math Students in Higher Education

Description: This quasi-experimental study examined the effects of participation in a Supplemental Instruction (SI) program on student test performance in a second-level developmental mathematics class in a four-year university setting. This research deviated from past research on Supplemental Instruction in that it examined effects of the program at the end of each test block rather than at the end of the course only. The quasi-experimental design was precipitated by an inability to control factors of participation and limited sample size. Test data were analyzed using analysis of variance; final course grades were analyzed using chi-square.
Date: May 1995
Creator: Stephens, Jan (Jan Ellen)
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study Concerning Self-Help Groups and College Mathematics

Description: The problem with which this investigation is concerned is that of determining whether utilizing self-help groups for remedial mathematics students would improve their course completion rates, achievement, and attitudes toward learning mathematics. The methods of determining the success/failure of self-help groups in this study were the Z-test from inferences concerning two proportions, the t-test from inferences concerning the difference between two independent means, and the t-test from inferences concerning the difference between two dependent means. The participants of the study were chosen from the students enrolled in "daytime" mathematics classes at Tarrant County Junior College - Northeast Campus, Hurst, Texas. The experiment was conducted over two semesters and the data combined for statistical analysis. There were one hundred four students involved in the study. Fifty-two students comprised each of the experimental and control classes. The term self-help group was utilized to describe a small group of two-to-fifteen people who engaged in discussion of responsibility, standards, confession, lay leadership, and action. The students did not study mathematics in self-help group sessions. The group meetings dealt with anxieties, attitudes, and commitment that may be associated with mathematics in general. To investigate the hypotheses of this study, data was collected to calculate the percentage completion rates, the means of the final exams taken by students, and the differences of the Semantic Differential scores given to students in the experimental class at the beginning and the end of the semester. This data was utilized for statistical analysis to determine if the experiment was successful. The report concludes that self-help groups did not significantly improve course completion rates, achievement, or attitudes of students toward learning mathematics. Forty-four per cent of the students that completed the experimental class participated in self-help groups.
Date: August 1985
Creator: Shaw, George A.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Community College Student Success in Developmental Mathematics Courses: a Comparison of Four Instructional Methods

Description: The student success rates for three developmental mathematics courses (prealgebra, elementary algebra, and intermediate algebra) taught through four instructional methods (lecture, personalized system of instruction [PSI], hybrid, and online) were examined. The sample consisted of 9,211 students enrolled in a large Texas community college from fall 2009 through spring 2011. Student success was defined as a grade of C or better. Chi-square tests were used to compare the three developmental mathematics courses success rates. Statistically significant differences in student success were found between all four methods of instruction for all three mathematics courses (prealgebra: χ2 [df = 3] = 107.90, p < 0.001; elementary algebra: χ2 [df = 3] = 88.39, p < 0.001; intermediate algebra χ2 [df = 3] = 254.18, p < 0.001). Binary logistic regression modeling was used to determine to what extent age, gender, ethnicity, residency, Pell eligibility and mode of instruction accounted for the community college students’ course success for each of the three developmental mathematics courses. For prealgebra, the independent variables of gender, race, age, residency, and mode of instruction made statistically significant contributions to the model (χ2 [df = 14, n = 1,743] = 159.196, p < .001; Nagelkerke R2 = .119), with greater success among female, White, younger, out of country students taking the course through lecture. For elementary algebra, the independent variables of race, age, residency, and mode of instruction made statistically significant contributions to the logistic regression model (χ2 [df = 14, n = 2,731] = 816.223, p < .001; Nagelkerke R2 = .358), with greater success among , younger, out of country students taking the course through lecture, hybrid or PSI. For intermediate algebra, only race and Pell eligibility made a statistically significant contribution to the logistic regression, with greater success among White, Pell-eligible students, and mode of instruction ...
Date: May 2014
Creator: Keller, Judith
Partner: UNT Libraries

Prediction of Community College Students' Success in Developmental Math with Traditional Classroom, Computer-Based On-Campus and Computer-Based at a Distance Instruction Using Locus of Control, Math Anxiety and Learning Style

Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between individual student differences and academic success in three pedagogical methods (traditional classroom, computer-aided instruction (CAI) in an on-campus setting, and CAI in a distance education setting) for developmental mathematics classes at the community college level. Locus of control, math anxiety and learning style were the individual differences examined. Final grade, final exam score and persistence were the indicators of success. The literature review focused on developmental mathematics, pedagogical techniques and variables contributing to academic performance. Two parallel research populations consisted of 135 Beginning Algebra students and 113 Intermediate Algebra students. The Rotter I-E Locus of Control Scale, the Abbreviated Mathematics Anxiety Rating Scale, the 4MAT Learning Type Measure, and an instrument to gather demographic data were used. It was the conclusion of this study that the instructional methods were not equal with respect to achievement. In Beginning Algebra, the CAI students received significantly higher final grades than did the traditionally taught students. In Intermediate Algebra traditional students scored significantly higher on the final exam than did the CBI students. There were more students persisting than expected in traditionally taught Beginning Algebra and no significant difference in attrition in Intermediate Algebra. There was no significant prediction of achievement in Beginning Algebra. For Intermediate Algebra math anxiety was a significant predictor for final exam percentage and locus of control was a significant predictor for final grade percentage. Only the instructional method contributed significantly to the prediction of attrition. While these findings are statistically significant, they account for only a small part of student success. However, the results had implications for the future. In particular, further study should be given to the question of whether CAI, and its associated expenses, is prudent for developmental mathematics instruction.
Date: May 2000
Creator: Blackner, Deborah Martin
Partner: UNT Libraries