Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.
open access

Testing of constitutive models in LAME.

Description: Constitutive models for computational solid mechanics codes are in LAME--the Library of Advanced Materials for Engineering. These models describe complex material behavior and are used in our finite deformation solid mechanics codes. To ensure the correct implementation of these models, regression tests have been created for constitutive models in LAME. A selection of these tests is documented here. Constitutive models are an important part of any solid mechanics code. If an analysis code is meant to provide accurate results, the constitutive models that describe the material behavior need to be implemented correctly. Ensuring the correct implementation of constitutive models is the goal of a testing procedure that is used with the Library of Advanced Materials for Engineering (LAME) (see [1] and [2]). A test suite for constitutive models can serve three purposes. First, the test problems provide the constitutive model developer a means to test the model implementation. This is an activity that is always done by any responsible constitutive model developer. Retaining the test problem in a repository where the problem can be run periodically is an excellent means of ensuring that the model continues to behave correctly. A second purpose of a test suite for constitutive models is that it gives application code developers confidence that the constitutive models work correctly. This is extremely important since any analyst that uses an application code for an engineering analysis will associate a constitutive model in LAME with the application code, not LAME. Therefore, ensuring the correct implementation of constitutive models is essential for application code teams. A third purpose of a constitutive model test suite is that it provides analysts with example problems that they can look at to understand the behavior of a specific model. Since the choice of a constitutive model, and the properties that are used in …
Date: September 1, 2007
Creator: Hammerand, Daniel Carl & Scherzinger, William Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

A Transonic Approximation

Description: The following report develops the theory of an approximation for the transonic flow of a polytropic gas.
Date: March 1954
Creator: Diaz, J. B. & Ludford, G. S. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Numerical Modeling Analysis of Stress Transfer Modification Concepts for Deep Longwall Mines

Description: Abstract: This U. S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) report evaluates three stress-transfermodification concepts for their potential in reducing longwall gate road stresses and closures. In each of the three concepts - packwalling, gob infilling, and entry filling - support structures are constructed on the headgate side of the panel parallel with or inby the face line. When the headgate becomes the tailgate of the adjacent panel, these structures are in place to accept stresses transferred from the mined-out panel. Using the USBM nonlinear boundary-element program MULSIM/NL, baseline models of typical longwall stress transfer behavior were developed for both intermediate depth and deep mining conditions. These models were verified by comparing model results with field measurements and observations. The stresstransfer-modification concepts were then incorporated into the deep baseline model to quantify the effects of each concept on tailgate closure. Modeling results indicated that entry filling is the most effective concept in reducing tailgate escapeway closure. Using only 18 m3 of a weak fill per meter of face advance (7.3 yd3 per ft of face advance), tailgate escapeway closure was reduced by 33%. By improving the quality of the fill, similar results were achieved using 50% less volume.
Date: 1995
Creator: Vandergrift, Thomas L. & Jude, Charles V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Constitutive models in LAME.

Description: The Library of Advanced Materials for Engineering (LAME) provides a common repository for constitutive models that can be used in computational solid mechanics codes. A number of models including both hypoelastic (rate) and hyperelastic (total strain) constitutive forms have been implemented in LAME. The structure and testing of LAME is described in Scherzinger and Hammerand ([3] and [4]). The purpose of the present report is to describe the material models which have already been implemented into LAME. The descriptions are designed to give useful information to both analysts and code developers. Thus far, 33 non-ITAR/non-CRADA protected material models have been incorporated. These include everything from the simple isotropic linear elastic models to a number of elastic-plastic models for metals to models for honeycomb, foams, potting epoxies and rubber. A complete description of each model is outside the scope of the current report. Rather, the aim here is to delineate the properties, state variables, functions, and methods for each model. However, a brief description of some of the constitutive details is provided for a number of the material models. Where appropriate, the SAND reports available for each model have been cited. Many models have state variable aliases for some or all of their state variables. These alias names can be used for outputting desired quantities. The state variable aliases available for results output have been listed in this report. However, not all models use these aliases. For those models, no state variable names are listed. Nevertheless, the number of state variables employed by each model is always given. Currently, there are four possible functions for a material model. This report lists which of these four methods are employed in each material model. As far as analysts are concerned, this information is included only for the awareness purposes. The analyst can take …
Date: September 1, 2007
Creator: Hammerand, Daniel Carl & Scherzinger, William Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Reduced order models for thermal analysis : final report : LDRD Project No. 137807.

Description: This LDRD Senior's Council Project is focused on the development, implementation and evaluation of Reduced Order Models (ROM) for application in the thermal analysis of complex engineering problems. Two basic approaches to developing a ROM for combined thermal conduction and enclosure radiation problems are considered. As a prerequisite to a ROM a fully coupled solution method for conduction/radiation models is required; a parallel implementation is explored for this class of problems. High-fidelity models of large, complex systems are now used routinely to verify design and performance. However, there are applications where the high-fidelity model is too large to be used repetitively in a design mode. One such application is the design of a control system that oversees the functioning of the complex, high-fidelity model. Examples include control systems for manufacturing processes such as brazing and annealing furnaces as well as control systems for the thermal management of optical systems. A reduced order model (ROM) seeks to reduce the number of degrees of freedom needed to represent the overall behavior of the large system without a significant loss in accuracy. The reduction in the number of degrees of freedom of the ROM leads to immediate increases in computational efficiency and allows many design parameters and perturbations to be quickly and effectively evaluated. Reduced order models are routinely used in solid mechanics where techniques such as modal analysis have reached a high state of refinement. Similar techniques have recently been applied in standard thermal conduction problems e.g. though the general use of ROM for heat transfer is not yet widespread. One major difficulty with the development of ROM for general thermal analysis is the need to include the very nonlinear effects of enclosure radiation in many applications. Many ROM methods have considered only linear or mildly nonlinear problems. In the present study …
Date: September 1, 2010
Creator: Hogan, Roy E., Jr. & Gartling, David K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Modeling of friction-induced deformation and microstructures.

Description: Frictional contact results in surface and subsurface damage that could influence the performance, aging, and reliability of moving mechanical assemblies. Changes in surface roughness, hardness, grain size and texture often occur during the initial run-in period, resulting in the evolution of subsurface layers with characteristic microstructural features that are different from those of the bulk. The objective of this LDRD funded research was to model friction-induced microstructures. In order to accomplish this objective, novel experimental techniques were developed to make friction measurements on single crystal surfaces along specific crystallographic surfaces. Focused ion beam techniques were used to prepare cross-sections of wear scars, and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and TEM to understand the deformation, orientation changes, and recrystallization that are associated with sliding wear. The extent of subsurface deformation and the coefficient of friction were strongly dependent on the crystal orientation. These experimental observations and insights were used to develop and validate phenomenological models. A phenomenological model was developed to elucidate the relationships between deformation, microstructure formation, and friction during wear. The contact mechanics problem was described by well-known mathematical solutions for the stresses during sliding friction. Crystal plasticity theory was used to describe the evolution of dislocation content in the worn material, which in turn provided an estimate of the characteristic microstructural feature size as a function of the imposed strain. An analysis of grain boundary sliding in ultra-fine-grained material provided a mechanism for lubrication, and model predictions of the contribution of grain boundary sliding (relative to plastic deformation) to lubrication were in good qualitative agreement with experimental evidence. A nanomechanics-based approach has been developed for characterizing the mechanical response of wear surfaces. Coatings are often required to mitigate friction and wear. Amongst other factors, plastic deformation of the substrate determines the coating-substrate interface reliability. Finite element modeling has been …
Date: December 1, 2006
Creator: Michael, Joseph Richard; Prasad, Somuri V.; Jungk, John Michael; Cordill, Megan J. (University of Minnesota); Bammann, Douglas J.; Battaile, Corbett Chandler et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Sales Forecasting Accuracy Over Time: An Empirical Investigation

Description: This study investigated forecasting accuracy over time. Several quantitative and qualitative forecasting models were tested and a number of combinational methods was investigated. Six time series methods, one causal model, and one subjective technique were compared in this study. Six combinational forecasts were generated and compared to individual forecasts. A combining technique was developed. Thirty data sets, obtained from a market leader in the cosmetics industry, were used to forecast sales. All series represent monthly sales from January 1985 to December 1989. Gross sales forecasts from January 1988 to June 1989 were generated by the company using econometric models. All data sets exhibited seasonality and trend.
Date: May 1991
Creator: Zbib, Imad J.(Imad Jamil)
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

KAYENTA : theory and user's guide.

Description: The physical foundations and domain of applicability of the Kayenta constitutive model are presented along with descriptions of the source code and user instructions. Kayenta, which is an outgrowth of the Sandia GeoModel, includes features and fitting functions appropriate to a broad class of materials including rocks, rock-like engineered materials (such as concretes and ceramics), and metals. Fundamentally, Kayenta is a computational framework for generalized plasticity models. As such, it includes a yield surface, but the term 'yield' is generalized to include any form of inelastic material response including microcrack growth and pore collapse. Kayenta supports optional anisotropic elasticity associated with ubiquitous joint sets. Kayenta supports optional deformation-induced anisotropy through kinematic hardening (in which the initially isotropic yield surface is permitted to translate in deviatoric stress space to model Bauschinger effects). The governing equations are otherwise isotropic. Because Kayenta is a unification and generalization of simpler models, it can be run using as few as 2 parameters (for linear elasticity) to as many as 40 material and control parameters in the exceptionally rare case when all features are used. For high-strain-rate applications, Kayenta supports rate dependence through an overstress model. Isotropic damage is modeled through loss of stiffness and strength.
Date: March 1, 2009
Creator: Brannon, Rebecca Moss (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Fossum, Arlo Frederick (BP America, Inc., Houston, TX) & Strack, Otto Eric
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Oil and Gas Supply Modeling

Description: Abstract: The symposium on Oil and Gas Supply Modeling, held at the Department of Commerce, Washington, DC (June 18-20, 1980), was funded by the Energy Information Administration of the Department of Energy and co-sponsored by the National Bureau of Standards' Operations Research Division. The symposium was organized to be a forum in which the theoretical and applied state-of-the-art of oil and gas supply models could be presented and discussed. Speakers addressed the following areas: the realities of oil and gas supply, prediction of oil and gas production, problems in oil and gas modeling, resource appraisal procedures, forecasting field size and production, investment and production strategies, estimating cost and production schedules for undiscovered fields production regulations, resource data, sensitivity analysis of forecasts, econometric analysis of resource depletion, oil and gas finding rates, and various models of oil and gas supply. This volume documents the proceedings (papers and discussion) of the symposium.
Date: May 1982
Creator: Gass, Saul I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Input Impedance of a Probe Antenna Exciting a TEM Cell

Description: Abstract: The input impedance of a probe antenna exciting a transverse electromagnetic (TEM) transmission line cell is formulated by a variational approach. The formulation also utilizes the results from a previous work on the field distribution inside a TEM cell excited by a vertical electrical Hertzian dipole. The final result of imoedance is shown to consist of two distinct terms, which are respectively contributed by the ordinary rectangular waveguide and the gap perturbation. Numerical results for both the real and imaginary parts of the impedance are given. The resistive part is found to be proportional to the square of the probe length, and the reactive part largely capacitive.
Date: April 1982
Creator: Wilson, Perry F.; Chang, David C. & Ma, Mark T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Excitation of a TEM Cell by a Vertical Electric Hertzian Dipole

Description: From abstract: The excitation of a transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell by a vertical electric Hertzian dipole is analyzed where the gap between the septum and side wall is assumed to be small. Approximate expressions for the field distribution and characteristic impedance are derived. These expressions are numerically evaluated for some typical geometries, and good agreement with previously published results is shown. The formation also allows a vertical offset for the septum position, thus offering more flexibility of increasing the size of the test area to accommodate larger pieces of test equipment.
Date: March 1981
Creator: Wilson, Perry F.; Chang, David C. & Ma, Mark T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Binary Solution Model for Computation of Equilibrium Compositions

Description: A NASA computer program (CEC) for calculation of complex equilibrium compositions has been modified to take into account the formation of an ideal binary solution from pure condensed species. The thermodynamics of the modification are discussed. Applications are presented.
Date: June 1978
Creator: Hsu, Chen C.; Land, Robert H. & Blander, Milton
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

A decision-theoretic method for surrogate model selection.

Description: The use of surrogate models to approximate computationally expensive simulation models, e.g., large comprehensive finite element models, is widespread. Applications include surrogate models for design, sensitivity analysis, and/or uncertainty quantification. Typically, a surrogate model is defined by a postulated functional form; values for the surrogate model parameters are estimated using results from a limited number of solutions to the comprehensive model. In general, there may be multiple surrogate models, each defined by possibly a different functional form, consistent with the limited data from the comprehensive model. We refer to each as a candidate surrogate model. Methods are developed and applied to select the optimal surrogate model from the collection of candidate surrogate models. The classical approach is to select the surrogate model that best fits the data provided by the comprehensive model; this technique is independent of the model use and, therefore, may be inappropriate for some applications. The proposed approach applies techniques from decision theory, where postulated utility functions are used to quantify the model use. Two applications are presented to illustrate the methods. These include surrogate model selection for the purpose of: (1) estimating the minimum of a deterministic function, and (2) the design under uncertainty of a physical system.
Date: June 1, 2005
Creator: Field, Richard V., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

A turbulence model for buoyant flows based on vorticity generation.

Description: A turbulence model for buoyant flows has been developed in the context of a k-{var_epsilon} turbulence modeling approach. A production term is added to the turbulent kinetic energy equation based on dimensional reasoning using an appropriate time scale for buoyancy-induced turbulence taken from the vorticity conservation equation. The resulting turbulence model is calibrated against far field helium-air spread rate data, and validated with near source, strongly buoyant helium plume data sets. This model is more numerically stable and gives better predictions over a much broader range of mesh densities than the standard k-{var_epsilon} model for these strongly buoyant flows.
Date: October 1, 2005
Creator: Domino, Stefan Paul; Nicolette, Vernon F.; O'Hern, Timothy John; Tieszen, Sheldon R. & Black, Amalia Rebecca
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Sensitivity in risk analyses with uncertain numbers.

Description: Sensitivity analysis is a study of how changes in the inputs to a model influence the results of the model. Many techniques have recently been proposed for use when the model is probabilistic. This report considers the related problem of sensitivity analysis when the model includes uncertain numbers that can involve both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty and the method of calculation is Dempster-Shafer evidence theory or probability bounds analysis. Some traditional methods for sensitivity analysis generalize directly for use with uncertain numbers, but, in some respects, sensitivity analysis for these analyses differs from traditional deterministic or probabilistic sensitivity analyses. A case study of a dike reliability assessment illustrates several methods of sensitivity analysis, including traditional probabilistic assessment, local derivatives, and a ''pinching'' strategy that hypothetically reduces the epistemic uncertainty or aleatory uncertainty, or both, in an input variable to estimate the reduction of uncertainty in the outputs. The prospects for applying the methods to black box models are also considered.
Date: June 1, 2006
Creator: Tucker, W. Troy & Ferson, Scott
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Experimental assessment of unvalidated assumptions in classical plasticity theory.

Description: This report investigates the validity of several key assumptions in classical plasticity theory regarding material response to changes in the loading direction. Three metals, two rock types, and one ceramic were subjected to non-standard loading directions, and the resulting strain response increments were displayed in Gudehus diagrams to illustrate the approximation error of classical plasticity theories. A rigorous mathematical framework for fitting classical theories to the data, thus quantifying the error, is provided. Further data analysis techniques are presented that allow testing for the effect of changes in loading direction without having to use a new sample and for inferring the yield normal and flow directions without having to measure the yield surface. Though the data are inconclusive, there is indication that classical, incrementally linear, plasticity theory may be inadequate over a certain range of loading directions. This range of loading directions also coincides with loading directions that are known to produce a physically inadmissible instability for any nonassociative plasticity model.
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Brannon, Rebecca Moss (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Burghardt, Jeffrey A. (University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT); Bauer, Stephen J. & Bronowski, David R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

On the formulation of a crystal plasticity model.

Description: This report presents the formulation of a crystal elasto-viscoplastic model and the corresponding integration scheme. The model is suitable to represent the isothermal, anisotropic, large deformation of polycrystalline metals. The formulation is an extension of a rigid viscoplastic model to account for elasticity effects, and incorporates a number of changes with respect to a previous formulation [Marin & Dawson, 1998]. This extension is formally derived using the well-known multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into an elastic and plastic components, where the elastic part is additionally decomposed into the elastic stretch V{sup e} and the proper orthogonal R{sup e} tensors. The constitutive equations are written in the intermediate, stress-free configuration obtained by unloading the deformed crystal through the elastic stretch V{sup e-}. The model is framed in a thermodynamic setting, and developed initially for large elastic strains. The crystal equations are then specialized to the case of small elastic strains, an assumption typically valid for metals. The developed integration scheme is implicit and proceeds by separating the spherical and deviatoric crystal responses. An ''approximate'' algorithmic material moduli is also derived for applications in implicit numerical codes. The model equations and their integration procedure have been implemented in both a material point simulator and a commercial finite element code. Both implementations are validated by solving a number of examples involving aggregates of either face centered cubic (FCC) or hexagonal close-packed (HCP) crystals subjected to different loading paths.
Date: August 1, 2006
Creator: Marin, Esteban B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Final report for the ASC gas-powder two-phase flow modeling project AD2006-09.

Description: This report documents activities performed in FY2006 under the ''Gas-Powder Two-Phase Flow Modeling Project'', ASC project AD2006-09. Sandia has a need to understand phenomena related to the transport of powders in systems. This report documents a modeling strategy inspired by powder transport experiments conducted at Sandia in 2002. A baseline gas-powder two-phase flow model, developed under a companion PEM project and implemented into the Sierra code FUEGO, is presented and discussed here. This report also documents a number of computational tests that were conducted to evaluate the accuracy and robustness of the new model. Although considerable progress was made in implementing the complex two-phase flow model, this project has identified two important areas that need further attention. These include the need to compute robust compressible flow solutions for Mach numbers exceeding 0.35 and the need to improve conservation of mass for the powder phase. Recommendations for future work in the area of gas-powder two-phase flow are provided.
Date: January 1, 2007
Creator: Evans, Gregory Herbert & Winters, William S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Social Network Simulation and Mining Social Media to Advance Epidemiology

Description: Traditional Public Health decision-support can benefit from the Web and social media revolution. This dissertation presents approaches to mining social media benefiting public health epidemiology. Through discovery and analysis of trends in Influenza related blogs, a correlation to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) influenza-like-illness patient reporting at sentinel health-care providers is verified. A second approach considers personal beliefs of vaccination in social media. A vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV) was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in May 2006. The virus is present in nearly all cervical cancers and implicated in many throat and oral cancers. Results from automatic sentiment classification of HPV vaccination beliefs are presented which will enable more accurate prediction of the vaccine's population-level impact. Two epidemic models are introduced that embody the intimate social networks related to HPV transmission. Ultimately, aggregating these methodologies with epidemic and social network modeling facilitate effective development of strategies for targeted interventions.
Date: August 2009
Creator: Corley, Courtney David
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Application of Method of Characteristics to Model the Transport of Discrete Solids in Partially-Filled Pipe Flow

Description: Report issued by the National Bureau of Standards over transporting discrete solids in partially-filled flow pipes. The methods and application of drainage flow are discussed. This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: February 1982
Creator: Swaffield, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
Back to Top of Screen