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Stability and control characteristics of a free-flying model with an unswept wing of aspect ratio 3 (XS-3)

Description: The results of power-off force tests and flight tests of a model with a thin unswept low-aspect-ratio wing are presented. The tests were made with the flaps retracted and deflected. The effects on the lateral flight characteristics of decreasing directional stability were noted.
Date: November 15, 1948
Creator: Bennett, Charles V. & Hassell, James L., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactor Configuration Development for ARIES-CS

Description: New compact, quasi-axially symmetric stellarator configurations have been developed as part of the ARIES-CS reactor studies. These new configurations have good plasma confinement and transport properties, including low losses of α particles and good integrity of flux surfaces at high β. We summarize the recent progress by showcasing two attractive classes of configurations — configurations with judiciously chosen rotational transforms to avoid undesirable effects of low order resonances on the flux surface integrity and configurations with very small aspect ratios (∼2.5) that have excellent quasi-axisymmetry and low field ripples.
Date: September 27, 2005
Creator: Ku LP, the ARIES-CS Team
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modular Coil Design for the Ultra-low Aspect Ratio Quasi-axially Symmetric Stellarator MHH2

Description: A family of two field-period quasi-axisymmetric stellarators generally known as MHH2 with aspect ratios of only {approx}2.5 was found. These configurations have low field ripples and excellent confinement of {alpha} particles. This discovery raises the hope that a compact stellarator reactor may eventually be designed with the property of tokamak transport and stellarator stability. In this paper we demonstrate that smooth modular coils may be designed for this family of configurations that not only yield plasmas with good physics properties but also possess engineering properties desirable for compact power producing reactors. We show designs featuring 16 modular coils with ratios of major radius to minimum coil-plasma separation {approx}5.5, major radius to minimum coil-coil separation {approx}10 and the maximum field in coil bodies to the field on axis {approx}2 for 0.2 m{sup 2} conductors. These coils is expected to allow plasmas operated at 5% {beta} with {alpha} energy loss < 10% for a reactor of major radius <9 m at 5 T.
Date: September 27, 2005
Creator: Ku LP, the ARIES-CS Team
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiments with Liquid Metal Walls: Status of the Lithium Tokamak Experiment

Description: Liquid metal walls have been proposed to address the first wall challenge for fusion reactors. The Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is the first magnetic confinement device to have liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFC's) that encloses virtually the entire plasma. In the Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX-U), a predecessor to LTX at PPPL, the highest improvement in energy confinement ever observed in Ohmically-heated tokamak plasmas was achieved with a toroidal liquid lithium limiter. The LTX extends this liquid lithium PFC by using a conducting conformal shell that almost completely surrounds the plasma. By heating the shell, a lithium coating on the plasma-facing side can be kept liquefied. A consequence of the low-recycling conditions from liquid lithium walls is the need for efficient plasma fueling. For this purpose, a molecular cluster injector is being developed. Future plans include the installation of a neutral beam for core plasma fueling, and also ion temperature measurements using charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy. Low edge recycling is also predicted to reduce temperature gradients that drive drift wave turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations are in progress to calculate fluctuation levels and transport for LTX plasmas, and new fluctuation diagnostics are under development to test these predictions. __________________________________________________
Date: February 16, 2010
Creator: Kaita, Robert; Boyle, Dennis; Gray, Timothy; Granstedt, Erik; Hammett, Gregory; Jacobson, Craig M et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department