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Experimental time to burnout of a prototypical ITER divertor plate during a simulated loss of flow accident

Description: Under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy, Office of Utility Technologies, the Energy Storage System Analysis and Development Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) conducted a cost analysis of energy storage systems for electric utility applications. The scope of the study included the analysis of costs for existing and planned battery, SMES, and flywheel energy storage systems. The analysis also identified the potential for cost reduction of key components.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Marshall, T.D.; Watson, R.D. & McDonald, J.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RELAP5 analyses of two hypothetical flow reversal events for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

Description: The reactor design features 4 independent cooling loops (3 active, 1 standby), each containing a main circulation pump (with battery powered pony motor), heat exchanger, an accumulator, and a check valve. The first transient assumes one of these pumps fails, and also that the check valve in that loop remains stuck open. This accident is considered extremely unlikely. Flow reverses in this loop, reducing core flow because much of the coolant is diverted from the intact loops back through the failed loop. The second transient examines a 102-mm-dia instantaneous pipe break near the core inlet (worst break location). A break is assumed to occur 90 s after a total loss-of-offsite power. Core flow reversal occurs because accumulator injection overpowers the diminishing pump flow. Safety margins are evaluated against 4 thermal limits: T{sub wall} = T{sub sat}, incipient boiling, onset of significant void, and critical heat flux. For the first transient, results show that these limits are not exceeded (at 95% non-exceedance probability level) if the pony motor battery lasts 30 minutes (present design value). For the second transient, the closest approach of the fuel surface temperature to local saturation temperature during core flow reversal is about 39 C, so the fuel remains cool during this transient. Although this work is for the ANSR geometry and operating conditions, the general conclusion may be applicable to other highly subcooled reactor systems.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Chen, N.C.J.; Wendel, M.W. & Yoder, G.L. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal and Chemical Stability of Baseline and Improved Crystalline Silicotitanate

Description: The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been evaluating technologies for removing radioactive cesium ({sup 137}Cs) from the supernate solutions stored in the high-level waste tanks at the site. Crystalline silicotitanate (CST) sorbent (IONSIV IE-911{reg_sign}, UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL), which is very effective at removing cesium from high-salt solutions, was one of three technologies that were tested. Because of the extremely high inventory of {sup 137}Cs expected for the large columns of CST that would be used for treating the SRS supernate, any loss of flow or cooling to the columns could result in high temperatures from radiolytic heating. Also, even under normal operating conditions, the CST would be exposed to the supernates for up to a year before being removed. Small-scale batch and column tests conducted last year using samples of production batches of CST showed potential problems with CST clumping and loss of cesium capacity after extended contact with the simulant solutions. Similar tests-using samples of a baseline and improved granular CST and the CST powder used to make both granular samples-were performed this year to compare the performance of the improved CST. The column tests, which used recirculating supernate simulant, showed that the baseline CST generated more precipitates of sodium aluminosilicate than the improved CST. The precipitates were particularly evident in the tubing that carried the simulant solution to and from the column, but the baseline CST also showed higher concentrations of aluminum on the CST than were observed for the improved CST. Recirculating the simulant through just a section of the tubing (no contact with CST) also produced small amounts of precipitate, similar to the amounts seen for the improved CST column. The sodium aluminosilicate formed bridges between the CST granules, causing clumps of CST to form in the column. Clumps were visible in the baseline ...
Date: January 23, 2002
Creator: Taylor, P.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

APT Blanket System Loss-of-Flow Accident (LOFA) Analysis Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Case 1: with Beam Shutdown and Active RHR

Description: This report is one of a series of reports that document normal operation and accident simulations for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket heat removal system. These simulations were performed for the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report.
Date: October 7, 1998
Creator: Hamm, L.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

APT Blanket System Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Case 2: with Beam Shutdown Only

Description: This report is one of a series of reports that document normal operation and accident simulations for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) blanket heat removal system. These simulations were performed for the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report. This report documents the results of simulations of a Loss-of-Flow Accident (LOFA) where power is lost to all of the pumps that circulate water in the blanket region, the accelerator beam is shut off and neither the residual heat removal nor cavity flood systems operate.
Date: October 7, 1998
Creator: Hamm, L.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Natural Convection and Boiling for Cooling SRP Reactors During Loss of Circulation Conditions

Description: This study investigated natural convection and boiling as a means of cooling SRP reactors in the event of a loss of circulation accident. These studies show that single phase natural convection cooling of SRP reactors in shutdown conditions with the present piping geometry is probably not feasible.
Date: June 26, 2001
Creator: Buckner, M.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Structural evaluation of electrosleeved tubes under severe accident transients.

Description: A flow stress model was developed for predicting failure of Electrosleeved PWR steam generator tubing under severe accident transients. The Electrosleeve, which is nanocrystalline pure nickel, loses its strength at temperatures greater than 400 C during severe accidents because of grain growth. A grain growth model and the Hall-Petch relationship were used to calculate the loss of flow stress as a function of time and temperature during the accident. Available tensile test data as well as high temperature failure tests on notched Electrosleeved tube specimens were used to derive the basic parameters of the failure model. The model was used to predict the failure temperatures of Electrosleeved tubes with axial cracks in the parent tube during postulated severe accident transients.
Date: November 12, 1999
Creator: Majumdar, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimation of steady-state and transcient power distributions for the RELAP analyses of the 1963 loss-of-flow and loss-of-pressure tests at BR2.

Description: To support the safety analyses required for the conversion of the Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, the simulation of a number of loss-of-flow tests, with or without loss of pressure, has been undertaken. These tests were performed at BR2 in 1963 and used instrumented fuel assemblies (FAs) with thermocouples (TC) imbedded in the cladding as well as probes to measure the FAs power on the basis of their coolant temperature rise. The availability of experimental data for these tests offers an opportunity to better establish the credibility of the RELAP5-3D model and methodology used in the conversion analysis. In order to support the HEU to LEU conversion safety analyses of the BR2 reactor, RELAP simulations of a number of loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure tests have been undertaken. Preliminary analyses showed that the conservative power distributions used historically in the BR2 RELAP model resulted in a significant overestimation of the peak cladding temperature during the transient. Therefore, it was concluded that better estimates of the steady-state and decay power distributions were needed to accurately predict the cladding temperatures measured during the tests and establish the credibility of the RELAP model and methodology. The new approach ('best estimate' methodology) uses the MCNP5, ORIGEN-2 and BERYL codes to obtain steady-state and decay power distributions for the BR2 core during the tests A/400/1, C/600/3 and F/400/1. This methodology can be easily extended to simulate any BR2 core configuration. Comparisons with measured peak cladding temperatures showed a much better agreement when power distributions obtained with the new methodology are used.
Date: May 23, 2011
Creator: Dionne, B. & Tzanos, C. P. (Nuclear Engineering Division)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Key Thermal Fluid Phenomena In Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactors

Description: Several types of gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been suggested as part of the international Generation IV initiative with the proposed NGNP (Next Generation Nuclear Plant) as one of the main concepts [MacDonald et al., 2003]. Meaningful studies for these designs will require accurate, reliable predictions of material temperatures to evaluate the material capabilities; these temperatures depend on the thermal convection in the core and in other important components. Some of these reactors feature complex geometries and wide ranges of temperatures, leading to significant variations of the gas thermodynamic and transport properties plus possible effects of buoyancy during normal and reduced power operations and loss-of-flow (LOFA) and loss-of-coolant scenarios. Potential issues identified to date include ''hot streaking'' in the lower plenum evolving from ''hot channels'' in prismatic cores. In order to predict thermal hydraulic behavior of proposed designs effectively and efficiently, it is useful to identify the dominant phenomena occurring.
Date: June 1, 2005
Creator: McEligot, D. M.; McCreery, G. E.; Bayless, P. D. & Marshall, T. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coupled high fidelity thermal hydraulics and neutronics for reactor safety simulations

Description: This work is a continuation of previous work on the importance of accuracy in the simulation of nuclear reactor safety transients. This work is qualitative in nature and future work will be more quantitative. The focus of this work will be on a simplified single phase nuclear reactor primary. The transient of interest investigates the importance of accuracy related to passive (inherent) safety systems. The transient run here will be an Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) transient. Here the coolant pump is turned off and the un’SCRAM’ed reactor transitions from forced to free convection (Natural circulation). Results will be presented that show the difference that the first order in time truncation physics makes on the transient. The purpose of this document is to illuminate a possible problem in traditional reactor simulation approaches. Detailed studies need to be done on each simulation code for each transient analyzed to determine if the first order truncation physics plays an important role.
Date: September 1, 2008
Creator: Mousseau, Vincent A.; Zhang, Hongbin & Zhao, Haihua
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flow blockage analysis for the advanced neutron source reactor

Description: The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor was designed to provide a research tool with capabilities beyond those of any existing reactors. One portion of its state-of-the-art design required high-speed fluid flow through narrow channels between the fuel plates in the core. Experience with previous reactors has shown that fuel plate damage can occur when debris becomes lodged at the entrance to these channels. Such debris disrupts the fluid flow to the plate surfaces and can prevent adequate cooling of the fuel. Preliminary ANS designs addressed this issue by providing an unheated entrance length for each fuel plate so that any flow disruption would recover, thus providing adequate heat removal from the downstream, heated portions of the fuel plates. As part of the safety analysis, the adequacy of this unheated entrance length was assessed using both analytical models and experimental measurements. The Flow Blockage Test Facility (FBTF) was designed and built to conduct experiments in an environment closely matching the ANS channel geometry. The FBTF permitted careful measurements of both heat transfer and hydraulic parameters. In addition to these experimental efforts, a thin, rectangular channel was modeled using the Fluent computational fluid dynamics computer code. The numerical results were compared with the experimental data to benchmark the hydrodynamics of the model. After this comparison, the model was extended to include those elements of the safety analysis that were difficult to measure experimentally. These elements included the high wall heat flux pattern and variable fluid properties. The results were used to determine the relationship between potential blockage sizes and the unheated entrance length required.
Date: January 1, 1996
Creator: Stovall, T.K.; Crabtree, J.A.; Felde, D.K. & Park, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Natural Circulation in the Blanket Heat Removal System During a Loss-of-Pumping Accident (LOFA) Based on Initial Conceptual Design

Description: A transient natural convection model of the APT blanket primary heat removal (HR) system was developed to demonstrate that the blanket could be cooled for a sufficient period of time for long term cooling to be established following a loss-of-flow accident (LOFA). The particular case of interest in this report is a complete loss-of-pumping accident. For the accident scenario in which pumps are lost in both the target and blanket HR systems, natural convection provides effective cooling of the blanket for approximately 68 hours, and, if only the blanket HR systems are involved, natural convection is effective for approximately 210 hours. The heat sink for both of these accident scenarios is the assumed stagnant fluid and metal on the secondary sides of the heat exchangers.
Date: October 7, 1998
Creator: Hamm, L.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermal and Chemical Stability of Crystalline Silicotitanate Sorbent

Description: The Savannah River Site (SRS) is evaluating technologies for removing radioactive cesium ({sup 137}Cs) from the supernate solutions stored in the high-level waste tanks at the site. Crystalline silicotitanate sorbent (IONSIV IE-911,{reg_sign} UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL), which is very effective at removing cesium from high-salt solution, is one of three technologies currently being tested. Because of the extremely high inventory of {sup 137}Cs expected for the large columns of crystalline silicotitanate (CST) that would be used for treating the SRS supernate, any loss of flow or cooling to the columns could result in high temperatures from radiolytic heating. Also, even for normal operation, the CST would be exposed to the supernates for up to a year before being removed. Small-scale tests using simulant solutions were used to determine the long-term stability of the CST to the solutions at various temperatures. In the tests performed in this study, the cesium capacity of the CST decreased significantly (76%) as the temperature of the simulant and CST during loading was increased from 23 to 80 C. CST exposed to recirculating SRS average simulant solution at room temperature in a column test showed a slow decrease in cesium loading capacity (measured at 23 C), with a drop of 30% for CST from the top of the bed and 13% for CST from the bottom of the bed after a 12-month period of exposure. A similar column test using a high-pH salt solution did not show any change in the cesium capacity of the CST. An increase was noted in pressure drop through the column using average simulant, but no change was observed for the column using high-pH salt solution.
Date: October 4, 2000
Creator: Taylor, P.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Summary of FY 1997 related to JAPC-U.S. DOE contract study on improvement of core safety -- study on GEM (III)

Description: FFTF was originally designed/constructed/operated to develop LMFBR fuels and materials. Inherent safety became a major focus of the US nuclear industry in the mid 1980`s. The inherent safety characteristics of LMFBRs were recognized but additional enhancement was desired. The presentation contents are: Fast Flux Test Facility history and status; Overview of contract activities; Summary of loss of flow without scram with GEMs testing; and Summary of pump start with GEMs testing.
Date: February 3, 1998
Creator: Burke, T. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of emergency cooling water system

Description: Evaluation of the adequacy of the emergency cooling water addition system (ECWA system) requires analysis of the postulated accidents for which the system is required to function. Analysis of these accidents requires a knowledge of the amount of the ECW added that goes to the fuel; both the total amount to the fuel and the amount to the central fuel assemblies. This memorandum presents the methods used to calculate the flows to the fuel and the results of the calculations. The calculations are illustrated with a loss of pumping power accident and a plenum line break accident.
Date: October 1, 1968
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Description: This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effects of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S. & Georgevich, V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of flow reversal test

Description: A series of tests has been conducted to measure the dryout power associated with a flow transient whereby the coolant in a heated channel undergoes a change in flow direction. An analysis of the test was made with the aid of a system code, RELAP5. A dryout criterion was developed in terms of a time-averaged void fraction calculated by RELAP5 for the heated channel. The dryout criterion was also compared with several CHF correlations developed for the channel geometry.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Cheng, L.Y. & Tichler, P.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Determination of maximum reactor power level consistent with the requirement that flow reversal occurs without fuel damage

Description: The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) operated by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) employs forced downflow for heat removal during normal operation. In the event of total loss of forced flow, the reactor will shutdown and the flow reversal valves open. When the downward core flow becomes sufficiently small then the opposing thermal buoyancy induces flow reversal leading to decay heat removal by natural convection. There is some uncertainty as to whether the natural circulation is adequate for decay heat removal after 60 MW operation. BNL- staff carried out a series of calculations to establish the adequacy of flow reversal to remove decay heat. Their calculations are based on a natural convective CHF model. The primary purpose of the present calculations is to review the accuracy and applicability of Fauske`s CHF model for the HFBR, and the assumptions and methodology employed by BNL-staff to determine the heat removal limit in the HFBR during a flow reversal and natural convection situation.
Date: April 19, 1990
Creator: Rao, D.V.; Darby, J.L.; Ross, S.B. & Clark, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department