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Demand Response Spinning Reserve Demonstration

Description: The Demand Response Spinning Reserve project is a pioneeringdemonstration of how existing utility load-management assets can providean important electricity system reliability resource known as spinningreserve. Using aggregated demand-side resources to provide spinningreserve will give grid operators at the California Independent SystemOperator (CAISO) and Southern California Edison (SCE) a powerful, newtool to improve system reliability, prevent rolling blackouts, and lowersystem operating costs.
Date: May 1, 2007
Creator: Eto, Joseph H.; Nelson-Hoffman, Janine; Torres, Carlos; Hirth,Scott; Yinger, Bob; Kueck, John et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

California customer load reductions during the electricity crisis: Did they help to keep the lights on?

Description: During summer 2001, Californians reduced electricity usage by 6 percent and average monthly peak demand by 8 percent, compared to summer 2000. These load reductions played an important role in avoiding the hundreds of hours of rotating power outages predicted several months prior. Many factors affected electricity use and peak demand in summer 2001, including weather, changes in the State's economy, and deliberate consumer responses to a variety of stimuli associated with the crisis. This paper assesses the roles played by these contributing factors, with a special focus on the extraordinary efforts made by Californians to reduce electricity consumption. We review the role of media coverage and informational campaigns on public awareness and the impact of rate increases and a variety of publicly funded programs in reducing electricity consumption. We also draw lessons for other regions that may be faced with the prospect of electricity shortages.
Date: May 1, 2002
Creator: Goldman, Charles A.; L., Barbose Galen & Eto, Joseph H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

End-use load control for power system dynamic stability enhancement

Description: Faced with the prospect of increasing utilization of the transmission and distribution infrastructure without significant upgrade, the domestic electric power utility industry is investing heavily in technologies to improve network dynamic performance through a program loosely referred to as Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS). Devices exploiting recent advances in power electronics are being installed in the power system to offset the need to construct new transmission lines. These devices collectively represent investment potential of several billion dollars over the next decade. A similar development, designed to curtail the peak loads and thus defer new transmission, distribution, and generation investment, falls under a category of technologies referred to as demand side management (DSM). A subset of broader conservation measures, DSM acts directly on the load to reduce peak consumption. DSM techniques include direct load control, in which a utility has the ability to curtail specific loads as conditions warrant. A novel approach has been conceived by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to combine the objectives of FACTS and the technologies inherent in DSM to provide a distributed power system dynamic controller. This technology has the potential to dramatically offset major investments in FACTS devices by using direct load control to achieve dynamic stability objectives. The potential value of distributed versus centralized grid modulation has been examined by simulating the western power grid under extreme loading conditions. In these simulations, a scenario is analyzed in which active grid stabilization enables power imports into the southern California region to be increased several hundred megawatts beyond present limitations. Modeling results show distributed load control is up to 30 percent more effective than traditional centralized control schemes in achieving grid stability.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Dagle, J. E.; Winiarski, D. W. & Donnelly, M. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impact of information and communications technologies on residental customer energy services

Description: This study analyzes the potential impact of information and communications technologies on utility delivery of residential customer energy services. Many utilities are conducting trials which test energy-related and non-energy services using advanced communications systems.
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Goldman, C.; Kempton, W.; Eide, A. & Iyer, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Demand-side management implementation and verification at Fort Drum, New York

Description: Through the Facility Energy Decision Screening (FEDS) process, the US Army Forces Command (FORSCOM) has identified present value savings of nearly $47 million in cost-effective energy conservation measures (ECMs) at Fort Drum, New York. With associated costs of more than $16 million (1992 $), the measures provide a net present value of $30.6 million for all identified projects. By implementing all cost-effective ECMs, Fort Drum can reduce its annual energy use by more than 230,000 MBtu (11% of its fossil energy consumption) and more than 27,000 MWh (32% of its electric energy consumption). The annual cost of energy services will decrease by $2.8 million (20%) at current energy rates. The servicing utility (Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation) has informally agreed to finance and implement cost-effective ECMs and to participate in the verification of energy savings. Verification baselining is under way; implementation of retrofit projects is expected to begin in late 1994. The utility-administered financing and contracting arrangements and the alternative federal programs for implementing the projects are described. The verification protocols and sampling plans for audit, indirect, and direct measurement levels of verification and the responsibilities of Fort Drum, the utility, the energy service companies (ESCOs), and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in the verification process are also presented. A preliminary weather-normalized model of baseline energy consumption has been developed based on a full year`s metered data.
Date: December 1, 1994
Creator: Armstrong, P.R.; Dixon, D.R.; Richman, E.E. & Rowley, S.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Model documentation report: Commercial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System

Description: This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Commercial Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components. This report serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for model analysts, users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports (Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1)). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements as future projects.
Date: February 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimating effects of energy planning on environmental impacts in the Western United States

Description: As part of their long-term planning process, utilities and government agencies are choosing power generation and conservation strategies that will effect environmental interactions for decades to come. In the US, power marketing administrations within the US Department of Energy have a strong influence over the strategies to be implemented in large multi-state regions. Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) prepared environmental impact statements (EIS) for two power marketing agencies, the Western Area Power Administration (Western) and Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville). The Western EIS assessed the effects of integrated resource planing (IRP) on the public utilities Western serves, while the Bonneville EIS assessed the effects of acquiring new energy resources in the pacific Northwest. The results were found using models that simulated utility systems. In both cases, environmental impacts were reduced when the conservation strategy in question was considered. This paper describes the results of the environmental analyses for the two agencies and compares the results with those of another simplified approach that relies on attributing emissions of new resources based on an extrapolation of existing capacity.
Date: December 1, 1994
Creator: Baechler, M.C. & Cothran, J.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ancillary-service details: regulation, load following, and generator response

Description: The purpose of this report is to examine empirically these intrahour and interhour load changes and the responses of a utility`s generating resources to those load changes. We analyze data, primarily from one control area, to see how it maintains ACE close to zero in an effort to meet the A1 and A2 criteria. Overall, we estimate that load following costs US electric utilities over one billion dollars a year. We first test alternative ways to identify trends over multihour periods using both regression analysis and rolling averages. Then, we consider several metrics for intrahour load following. Next we examine characteristics of load following for different time-averaging periods and compare the dynamics of loads and load following generation across these time periods. Finally, we consider the contribution of each load to the total load following requirements of the control area.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Hirst, E. & Kirby, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

What`s new in federal energy management: FEMP program overview. Federal energy saver showcases

Description: To promote widespread Federal energy efficiency, agencies are showcasing their best energy efficiency, water conserving, and solar and other renewable energy technologies. To highlight these successful energy-efficient projects, Executive Order 12902 directs agencies to designate at least one newly constructed or existing building as a showcase facility. At existing facilities, agencies must also try to incorporate cogeneration and indoor air quality improvements. Agencies are directed to develop and implement effective plans to make these showcase projects happen. Project successes will show the strength of partnering with other agencies, energy services companies, utilities, and national laboratories, and of using the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) as a resource. The goal is Federal facilities operating at peak efficiency. A Federal Energy Saver Showcase plaque is prominently displayed at each showcase site, notifying visitors they are entering a government building that successfully conserves energy and water and saves taxpayer dollars.
Date: August 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

What`s new in federal energy management: FEMP program overview. SAVEnergy program

Description: The SAVEnergy Program provides direct assistance to Federal agencies in identifying and implementing energy efficiency and water conservation measures. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) and Executive Order 12902 require that Federal agencies reduce the energy consumed in Federal buildings. The Executive Order increases the goal to a 30% reduction, compared with 1985, by 2005. In addition, agencies are required, to the maximum extent possible, to install all energy and water conservation measures with paybacks of less than 10 years. To help meet these goals, the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Federal Energy management Program (FEMP) recently initiated the SAVEnergy Program. The SAVEnergy approach has three key elements: The Action Plan with recommended conservation actions and complete proposals on how the agency can implement them; The Action Team to implement the SAVEnergy Action Plan; The FEMPTracks database to evaluate the SAVEnergy Program (and all other FEMP programs) and record progress toward conservation goals.
Date: August 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and application of a high-speed, high-resolution data acquisition system for monitoring power at the service entrance to buildings

Description: A non-intrusive load monitoring system (NILMS) was developed and tested to determine its capabilities and examine ways that the system can supplement the understanding of how energy is used in a building. The investigation of the system as a method for obtaining short-term building energy use and demand data faster, as less cost, with less complexity, and less intrusively than from conventional submetering is described in this report. Data acquisition hardware and software, a power transducer, and current transformers were assembled into a system that could be used to sample the instantaneous real and reactive power coming into a building. The system was used to collect power profiles at a commercial and a residential building. The NILMS can sample power at low speeds (one sample per hour or less) and at speeds exceeding 100 Hz. Large changes in building power such as those due to central heating and cooling systems, water heaters, or banks of lights can easily be discriminated from total building power profiles collected by the system. Smaller loads, less than 1 or 2 kW, can be resolved when there is little ``noise`` in the power profile. Very small loads, less than 100 W, can be resolved in a residential application. Resolution becomes more difficult as larger and more frequent fluctuations occur. The ability of the system to easily collect valuable, short-term building power profiles, which permit individual loads to be determined (resolved), makes the system attractive for a number of applications. The system could prove very useful for measuring short-term energy use and demand, assisting building energy auditors in assessing building deficiencies, providing short-term performance data for validating engineering-based savings estimates and calibrating computer-based building performance models, and for validating, developing, and/or improving building and building system operating strategies.
Date: February 1, 1995
Creator: Sharp, T.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Defining intra- and interhour load swings

Description: Electricity consumption varies with time. These temporal variations include moment-to-moment fluctuations plus hour-to-hour changes associated with diurnal, weekly, and seasonal patterns. The problem naturally splits into two time frames: (1) fast fluctuations, on the order of seconds to minutes, and (2) slower fluctuations, on the order of an hour or longer. Fast fluctuations in aggregate load result primarily from the random movements of individual loads. Slower fluctuations result from common external causes, such as time of day, day of the week, and weather. This study empirically examines intra- and interhour load following. It develops methods to separate intra- and interhour load fluctuations, identifies the key features of each, and shows how they differ from each other.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Hirst, E. & Kirby, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy impacts of attic duct retrofits in Sacramento houses

Description: Inefficiencies in air distribution systems have been identified as a major source of energy loss in US sunbelt homes. Research indicates that approximately 30--40% of the thermal energy delivered to the ducts passing through unconditioned spaces is lost through air leakage and conduction through the duct walls. Field experiments over the past several years have well documented the expected levels of air leakage and the extent to which that leakage can be reduced by retrofit. Energy savings have been documented to a more limited extent, based upon a few field studies and simulation model results. Simulations have also indicated energy loss through ducts during the off cycle caused by thermosiphon-induced flows, however this effect had not been confirmed experimentally. A field study has been initiated to separately measure the impacts of combined duct leak sealing and insulation retrofits, and to optimize a retrofit protocol for utility DSM programs. This paper describes preliminary results from 6 winter and 5 summer season houses. These retrofits cut overall duct leakage area approximately 64%, which translated to a reduction in envelope ELA of approximately 14%. Wrapping ducts and plenums with R-6 insulation translated to a reduction in average flow-weighted conduction losses of 33%. These experiments also confirmed the appropriateness of using duct ELA and operating pressures to estimate leakage flows for the population, but indicated significant variations between these estimates and measured flows on a house by house basis. In addition, these experiments provided a confirmation of the predicted thermosiphon flows, both under winter and summer conditions. Finally, average material costs were approximately 20% of the total retrofit costs, and estimates of labor required for retrofits based upon these experiments were: 0.04 person-hrs/cm{sup 2} of duct sealed and 0.21 person-hrs/m{sup 2} of duct insulated.
Date: August 1, 1994
Creator: Jump, D. & Modera, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

What`s new in federal energy management: FEMP program overview. Federal Energy Management Program

Description: The US government has an enormous cost-saving opportunity as the largest energy user in the world. In 1994, the government spent $8 billion for its 500,000 buildings, it vehicles, and process energy. The US Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) reduces the cost of government and makes it work better through energy efficiency, use of renewable energy, and water conservation. FEMP leads Federal energy efficiency efforts and helps Federal energy managers identify and procure the best, most cost-effective energy-saving projects. It does this through proactive problem solving; an aggressive emphasis on increasing the number and quality of projects; and effective partnerships among agencies, utilities, the private sector, and states. Partnerships lead to increased motivation and education and reduced barriers to successful procurement. As the lead organization implementing legislation and Presidential direction for Federal energy efficiency, FEMP administers an interagency energy committee and task force and collaborates with the DOE national energy laboratories. FEMP works with energy service companies, energy savings product manufacturers, and utilities. This partnership will lead to a $1 billion investment by companies willing to invest in return for a share of the energy cost savings. With FEMP project financing, audits, training and technical assistance, and new technology demonstrations, agencies overcome obstacles to achieving widespread energy efficiency.
Date: August 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electric Power annual 1996: Volume II

Description: This document presents a summary of electric power industry statistics. Data are included on electric utility retail sales of electricity, revenues, environmental information, power transactions, emissions, and demand-side management.
Date: December 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ANN - based distribution system reconfiguration

Description: This paper describes an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) - based distribution system reconfiguration scheme to reduce system loss. The ANN is trained for different load levels and different network topologies. The proposed scheme has been tested using a 38 - bus distribution system. The results are very promising.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Momoh, J.A.; Wang, Yanchun & Rizy, D.T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Economic analysis of PV hybrid power system: Pinnacles National Monument

Description: PV hybrid electric power systems can offer an economically competitive alternative to engine generator (genset) systems in many off-grid applications. Besides the obvious `green` advantages of producing less noise and emissions, the PV hybrid can, in some cases, offer a lower life-cycle cost (LCC) then the genset. This paper evaluates the LCC of the 9.6 kWp PV hybrid power system installed by the National Park Services (NPS) at Pinnacles National Monument, CA. NPS motivation for installation of this hybrid was not based on economics, but rather the need to replace two aging diesel gensets with an alternative that would be quieter, fuel efficient, and more in keeping with new NPS emphasis on sustainable design and operations. In fact, economic analysis shows a lower 20-year LCC for the installed PV hybrid than for simple replacement of the two gensets. The analysis projects are net savings by the PV hybrid system of $83,561 and over 162,000 gallons of propane when compared with the genset-only system. This net savings is independent of the costs associated with environmental emissions. The effects of including emissions costs, according to NPS guidelines, is also discussed. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Rosenthal, A.; Durand, S.; Thomas, M. & Post, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ancillary-service details: Dynamic scheduling

Description: Dynamic scheduling (DS) is the electronic transfer from one control area to another of the time-varying electricity consumption associated with a load or the time-varying electricity production associated with a generator. Although electric utilities have been using this technique for at least two decades, its use is growing in popularity and importance. This growth is a consequence of the major changes under way in US bulk-power markets, in particular efforts to unbundle generation from transmission and to increase competition among generation providers. DS can promote competition and increase choices. It allows consumers to purchase certain services from entities outside their physical-host area and it allows generators to sell certain services to entities other than their physical host. These services include regulation (following minute-to-minute variations in load) and operating reserves, among others. Such an increase in the number of possible suppliers and customers should encourage innovation and reduce the costs and prices of providing electricity services. The purpose of the project reported here was to collect and analyze data on utility experiences with DS. Chapter 2 provides additional details and examples of the definitions of DS. Chapter 3 explains why DS might be an attractive service that customers and generators, as well as transmission providers, might wan to use. Chapter 4 presents some of the many current DS examples the authors uncovered in their interviews. Chapter 5 discusses the costs and cost-effectiveness of DS. Chapter 6 explains what they believe can and cannot be electronically moved from one control area to another, primarily in terms of the six ancillary services that FERC defined in Order 888. Chapter 7 discusses the need for additional research on DS.
Date: January 1, 1997
Creator: Hirst, E. & Kirby, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The demise of residential new construction programs: Is there life after death?

Description: Based on an evaluation of 10 residential new construction programs sponsored by investor-owned utilities in the US, the authors find that many of these programs are in dire straits and are in danger of being discontinued because they are not cost-effective. They believe that the cost-effectiveness of residential new construction programs can be improved by: (1) reducing program marketing costs and developing more effective marketing strategies; (2) promoting technologies and advanced building design practices significantly exceeding state and federal standards; (3) recognizing these programs` role in increasing compliance by participants with existing state building codes; and (4) obtaining an energy-savings credit for program spillover (market transformation) impacts. The issues involved in evaluating residential new construction programs will be challenging as evaluators attempt to quantify the savings from program spillover.
Date: May 1, 1995
Creator: Vine, E.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy storage systems program report for FY97

Description: Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, conducts the Energy Storage Systems Program, which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. The goal of this program is to collaborate with industry in developing cost-effective electric energy storage systems for many high-value stationary applications. Sandia National Laboratories is responsible for the engineering analyses, contracted development, and testing of energy storage components and systems. This report details the technical achievements realized during fiscal year 1997. 46 figs., 20 tabs.
Date: August 1, 1998
Creator: Butler, P.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Residential energy-efficiency retrofit projects at two universities, overview

Description: Two recent US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Buildings Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS) projects are investigating high-performance, residential energy-efficiency retrofit measures in indigenous housing types. These projects are studying and testing high-performance, energy-efficiency retrofits that will optimize envelope improvements, equipment improvements, and operational improvements to the cost-effective level (not just code minimums). They will provide an opportunity to design, implement, and evaluate energy efficiency improvements related to the rehabilitation of culturally significant residential units under real world conditions. Each project will establish a cooperative venture between the individual University, a community development organization, home builders/remodelers, and utilities and other governmental agencies to accomplish the rehabilitation of residential units. Three residential units will be rehabilitated in each location.
Date: March 1, 1998
Creator: Wendt, R.; Lipscumb, L. & Bosworth, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Industrial operations and maintenance energy measures: A review

Description: Industry consumes a significant percentage of the total electric energy consumption both nationally and in the Pacific Northwest. However, industrial demand-side management (DSM) activities in this sector are underdeveloped and typically concentrate on new technologies and new equipment. An overlooked opportunity for electric resource development is through operations and maintenance (O and M) activities. The purpose of this project is to determine the industrial DSM potential that may be achieved through O and M practices both in the US and the Pacific Northwest. The overall goal of the project is to identify, quantify, confirm, and develop conservation resources that can be achieved from the industrial sector through O and M practices and energy measures. The results of the study identify a significant electric resource potential available through improved O and M activities in industry. Several O and M type energy-saving measures that increase efficiencies and reduce loads are identified and estimates of potential energy savings associated with each measure are presented. Systems identified with the most potential include compressed-air systems; motors and motor drives; lighting; heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC); and control systems. The results of the research show that industrial electric energy consumption can be notably reduced by implementing key O and M type energy measures. Specifically, the results of industrial energy audits, case studies, and other published sources indicate that reductions in energy consumption from improved O and M activities can average between 8% and 12.5%.
Date: December 1, 1994
Creator: Parker, S.A.; Gaustad, K.L. & Winiarski, D.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Initial Evidence for Self-Organized Criticality in Electric Power System Blackouts

Description: We examine correlations in a time series of electric power system blackout sizes using scaled window variance analysis and R/S statistics. The data shows some evidence of long time correlations and has Hurst exponent near 0.7. Large blackouts tend to correlate with further large blackouts after a long time interval. Similar effects are also observed in many other complex systems exhibiting self-organized criticality. We discuss this initial evidence and possible explanations for self-organized criticality in power systems blackouts. Self-organized criticality, if fully confirmed in power systems, would suggest new approaches to understanding and possibly controlling blackouts.
Date: January 4, 2000
Creator: Carreras, B.A.; Dobson, I.; Newman, D.E. & Poole, A.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Relighting demonstration project Robins Air Force Base, Georgia

Description: Significant energy savings are available through relighting with modern, energy efficient systems. As a demonstration, a relighting project was recently completed at Robins Air Force Base, Warner-Robins, Georgia. The project was designed to overcome a reluctance to pursue large scale relighting of the entire facility due to prior unfavorable experiences and an unusually large non-office working environment. The project followed contemporary lighting design practices, with the added dimension of involving building occupants in the process. Involving building occupants promoted their acceptance of the project and provided needed critical feedback. Their involvement helped secure their assistance in resolving special design concerns involving radio frequency interference and glare. Although often cited as simple, relighting projects are commonly confronted with problems. This document describes problems, foreseen and unforeseen, encountered by this relighting demonstration, and their solutions.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Larson, L.L.; Purcell, C.W.; McKay, H. & Harris, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department