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Enabling instrumentation and technology for 21st century light sources

Description: We present the summary from the Accelerator Instrumentation and Technology working group, one of the five working groups that participated in the BES-sponsored Workshop on Accelerator Physics of Future Light Sources held in Gaithersburg, MD September 15-17, 2009. We describe progress and potential in three areas: attosecond instrumentation, photon detectors for user experiments, and insertion devices.
Date: June 1, 2010
Creator: Byrd, J.M.; Shea, T.J.; Denes, P.; Siddons, P.; Attwood, D.; Kaertner, F. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

lightsources.org: An Internet Site for Light SourceCommunication

Description: Research at the world's accelerator- (storage-ring and linac) based light sources is one of the most dynamic and rapidly growing fields of science. It frequently results in direct benefits to society, thereby demonstrating the value of the research with very concrete examples, but this is not widely understood or appreciated outside of the immediate user community. Our growing group of light source communicators from facilities in Europe, Asia, and the Americas, inspired by the Interactions.org Web site created by high-energy (elementary-particle)physics communicators, concluded that a light source community Web site (lightsources.org) would be the best tool for establishing effective collaboration between the communications offices of the world's light sources and to maximize the impact of our efforts. We envision lightsources.org to serve as a one-stop-shopping site for information about all aspects of light sources and the research they make possible. Audiences to be served include science communicators, the press, policymakers, the light source community, the wider scientific community, the science-interested public, and students and educators. Our proposal has been sent to the world's light source facility directors by J. Murray Gibson (APS) and William G. Stirling (ESRF). As a result,light sources.org is now being supported by a growing list of facilities from Europe, North America, and Asia. We hope to launch lightsources.org before the end of 2004.
Date: October 4, 2004
Creator: Robinson, Art
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

X-RAY ACTIVE MATRIX PIXEL SENSORS BASEDON J-FET TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPED FOR THE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE.

Description: An X-ray Active Matrix Pixel Sensor (XAMPS) is being developed for recording data for the X-ray Pump Probe experiment at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Special attention has to be paid to some technological challenges that this design presents. New processes were developed and refined to address problems encountered during previous productions of XAMPS. The development of these critical steps and corresponding tests results are reported here.
Date: October 29, 2007
Creator: CARINI,G.A.; CHEN, W.; LI, Z.; REHAK, P. & SIDDONS, D.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of Beam Instability Under the Effects of Long-Range Transverse Wake Fields in the Berkeley Future Light Source

Description: An ultra-relativistic charged particle bunch moving through a resonator cavity leaves behind a wake field that will affect subsequent bunches (if the bunch is not ultra-relativistic, the wake field will not be exclusively behind it). If the initial bunch enters the cavity off-axis, it will produce a transverse wake field that can then kick later bunches off the axis. Thus, even bunches that were initially traveling on axis could be displaced and, in turn, produce their own transverse wake fields, affecting following bunches. The offsets obtained by bunches could increase along the bunch train, leading to the so-called multi-bunch beam break-up instability [1]. The purpose of our investigation is to see whether such instability will occur in the superconducting, 1.3 GHz, 2.5GeV linac (see Table 1) planned for the Berkeley future light source (BFLS). We assume an initial steady-state situation established for machine operation; i.e. a continuous process where every bunch follows the same trajectory through the linac, with only small deviations from the axis of the rf structures. We will look at a possible instability arising from a bunch having a small deviation from the established trajectory. Such a deviation would produce a wake field that is slightly different from the one produced by the bunches following the established trajectory. This could lead to subsequent bunches deviating further from the established trajectory. We will assume the deviations are small (at first) and so the difference in the wake field caused by a bunch not traveling along the established trajectory is well approximated by a long-range transverse dipole wake. We are concerned only with deviations from the established trajectory; thus, in our models, a transverse position of zero corresponds to the bunch traveling along the established trajectory. Under this assumption, only the additional long-range transverse dipole wake remains in our ...
Date: August 31, 2008
Creator: Kur, Eugene & Zholents, Alexander A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RECENT BEAM MEASUREMENTS AND NEW INSTRUMENTATION AT THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE

Description: The Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley was the first of the soft x-ray third generation light source ever built, and since 1993 has been in continuous and successful operation serving a large community of users in the VUV and soft x-ray community. During these years the storage ring underwent through several important upgrades that allowed maintaining the performance of this veteran facility at the forefront. The ALS beam diagnostics and instrumentation have followed a similar path of innovation and upgrade and nowadays include most of the modem and last generation devices and technologies that are commercially available and used in the recently constructed third generation light sources. In this paper we will not focus on such already widely known systems, but we will concentrate our effort in the description of some measurements techniques, instrumentation and diagnostic systems specifically developed at the ALS and used during the last few years.
Date: May 5, 2008
Creator: Sannibale, Fernando; Baptiste, Kenneth; Barry, Walter; Chin, Michael; Filippetto, Daniele; Jaegerhofer, Lukas et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Spectroscopy of ions using fast beams and ion traps

Description: A knowledge of the spectra of ionized atoms is of importance in many fields. They can be studied in a wide variety of light sources. In recent years techniques coming under the broad heatings of fast beams and ion traps have been used extensively for such investigations. This article considers the advantages that various techniques have for particular applications.
Date: October 1, 2004
Creator: Pinnington, E. H. & Trabert, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Four Cell Lattice for the UCLA Compact Light Source Synchrotron

Description: The 1.5 GeV compact light source UCS proposed for UCLA must fit into a shielded vault that is 9.144 meters (30 feet) wide. In order for the machine to fit into the allowable space, the ring circumference must be reduced 36 meters, the circumference of the six cell lattice, to something like 26 or 27 meters. The four cell lattice described in this report has a ring circumference of 27.0 meters.
Date: March 12, 1999
Creator: Garren, A.A. & Green, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Power Picosecond Laser Pulse Recirculation

Description: We demonstrate a nonlinear crystal-based short pulse recirculation cavity for trapping the second harmonic of an incident high power laser pulse. This scheme aims to increase the efficiency and flux of Compton-scattering based light sources. We demonstrate up to 36x average power enhancement of frequency doubled sub-millijoule picosecond pulses, and 17x average power enhancement of 177 mJ, 10 ps, 10 Hz pulses.
Date: April 12, 2010
Creator: Shverdin, M Y; Jovanovic, I; Semenov, V A; Betts, S M; Brown, C; Gibson, D J et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LCLS XTOD Attenuator System System Concept Report

Description: The attenuator system for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray Transport, Optics and Diagnostics (XTOD) system has been configured and analyzed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's New Technologies Engineering Division (NTED) as requested by the SLAC/LCLS program. The system layout, performance analyses and selection of the vacuum components are presented in this System Conceptual Review (SCR) report. Also included are the plans for prototype, procurement, mechanical integration, and the cost estimates.
Date: April 12, 2006
Creator: Kishiyama, K; Roeben, M; Trent, J; Ryutov, D & Shen, S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Low-Intensity Nonlinear Spectral Effects in Compton Scattering

Description: Nonlinear effects are known to occur in Compton scattering light sources, when the laser normalized 4-potential, A = e{radical}-A{sub {mu}}A{sup {mu}}/m{sub 0}c approaches unity. In this letter, it is shown that nonlinear spectral features can appear at arbitrarily low values of A, if the fractional bandwidth of the laser pulse, {Delta}{phi}{sup -1}, is sufficiently small to satisfy A{sup 2} {Delta}{phi} {approx_equal} 1. A three dimensional analysis, based on a local plane-wave, slow-varying envelope approximation, enables the study of these effects for realistic interactions between an electron beam and a laser pulse, and their influence on high-precision Compton scattering light sources.
Date: February 23, 2010
Creator: Hartemann, F V; Albert, F; Siders, C W & Barty, C P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ultrabright Laser-based MeV-class Light Source

Description: We report first light from a novel, new source of 10-ps 0.776-MeV gamma-ray pulses known as T-REX (Thomson-Radiated Extreme X-rays). The MeV-class radiation produced by TREX is unique in the world with respect to its brightness, spectral purity, tunability, pulse duration and laser-like beam character. With T-REX, one can use photons to efficiently probe and excite the isotope-dependent resonant structure of atomic nucleus. This ability will be enabling to an entirely new class of isotope-specific, high resolution imaging and detection capabilities.
Date: April 2, 2008
Creator: Albert, F; Anderson, G; Anderson, S; Bayramian, A; Berry, B; Betts, S et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EUV-multilayers on grating-like topographies

Description: In this study, multilayer morphology near the key anomalies in grating-like structures, namely sharp step-edges and steep walls, are examined. Different deposition schemes are employed. Based on cross section TEM analysis an explanatory model describing the morphology of the successive layers is developed. A further insight into the periodicity and the general performance of the multilayer is obtained by EUV microscopy. The main distortions in multilayer structure and hence EUV performance are found to be restricted to a region within a few hundred nanometers from the anomalies, which is very small compared to the proposed grating period (50-100 {micro}m). These multilayer coated blazed gratings can thus be considered a viable option for spectral purity enhancement of EUV light sources.
Date: March 12, 2010
Creator: van Boogaard, A. J. R.; Louis, E.; Goldberg, K. A.; Mochi, I. & Bijkerk, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optical imaging through turbid media using a degenerate-four-wave mixing correlation time gate

Description: This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have demonstrated the use of a degenerate-four-wave-mixing time gate to allow imaging through turbid media, with potential application to tissue imaging. A near infrared (NIR), long-pulse Cr{sup +3}:Li{sub 2}SrAlF{sub 6} laser was used as the light source (during most the project) for imaging through clear and turbid media. Preliminary experiments were also carried out with a continuous diode laser.
Date: November 1, 1998
Creator: Bigio, I.J.; Strauss, C.E.M. & Zerkle, D.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Trends and Opportunities in Light Source Development

Description: After a decade of rather quiet growth for FELs there is now a lot of activity in the light source community. This is the result of a combination of factors including successful operation of the third generation light sources, the establishment of a very productive user community at both synchrotrons and FELs, and the continuing technical improvements of accelerators and related technology which allow ever more challenging machines to be considered. There are a number of themes that carry this development including pushing wavelengths shorter, brightnesses higher, pulses shorter, increasing average power, and providing for multiple synchronized photon beams with multiple wavelengths. This talk will discuss some of the plans and proposals currently circulating and attempt to provide a glimpse into the near future of our field by illustrating the technologies that drive source development.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Neil, George R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Science and Technology of Future Light Sources

Description: Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving health, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee [1]. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1, and serve the entire range of science from advanced materials to life sciences. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. X-rays with energies above 10 keV offer capabilities extending beyond the nanoworld shown in Figure 1.1 due to their ability to penetrate into optically opaque or thick objects. This opens the door to combining atomic level information from scattering studies with 3D information on longer length scales from real space imaging with a resolution approaching 1 nm. The investigation of multiple length scales is important in hierarchical structures, providing knowledge about function of living organisms, the atomistic origin of materials failure, the optimization of industrial synthesis, or the working of devices. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the ...
Date: January 28, 2009
Creator: Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Dierker, Steve; Falcone, Roger; Galayda, John; Gibson, Murray et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scientific Needs for Future X-ray Sources in the U.S. -- A White Paper

Description: Many of the important challenges facing humanity, including developing alternative sources of energy and improving heath, are being addressed by advances that demand the improved understanding and control of matter. While the visualization, exploration, and manipulation of macroscopic matter have long been technological goals, scientific developments in the twentieth century have focused attention on understanding matter on the atomic scale through the underlying framework of quantum mechanics. Of special interest is matter that consists of natural or artificial nanoscale building blocks defined either by atomic structural arrangements or by electron or spin formations created by collective correlation effects. The essence of the challenge to the scientific community has been expressed in five grand challenges for directing matter and energy recently formulated by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. These challenges focus on increasing our understanding of, and ultimately control of, matter at the level of atoms, electrons. and spins, as illustrated in Figure 1.1. Meeting these challenges will require new tools that extend our reach into regions of higher spatial, temporal, and energy resolution. Since the fundamental interaction that holds matter together is of electromagnetic origin, it is intuitively clear that electromagnetic radiation is the critical tool in the study of material properties. On the level of atoms, electrons and spins, x rays have proved especially valuable.
Date: October 16, 2008
Creator: Falcone, Roger; Stohr, Joachim; Bergmann, Uwe; Corlett, John; Galayda, John; Hastings, Jerry et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Energy Recovery Linacs for Light Source Applications

Description: Energy Recovery Linacs are being considered for applications in present and future light sources. ERLs take advantage of the continuous operation of superconducting rf cavities to accelerate high average current beams with low losses. The electrons can be directed through bends, undulators, and wigglers for high brightness x ray production. They are then decelerated to low energy, recovering power so as to minimize the required rf drive and electrical draw. When this approach is coupled with advanced continuous wave injectors, very high power, ultra-short electron pulse trains of very high brightness can be achieved. This paper will review the status of worldwide programs and discuss the technology challenges to provide such beams for photon production.
Date: April 1, 2011
Creator: Neil, George
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Electron Bunch Compression Scheme for a Superconducting Radio Frequency Linear Accelerator Driven Light Source

Description: We describe an electron bunch compression scheme suitable for use in a light source driven by a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac. The key feature is the use of a recirculating linac to perform the initial bunch compression. Phasing of the second pass beam through the linac is chosen to de-chirp the electron bunch prior to acceleration to the final energy in an SRF linac ('afterburner'). The final bunch compression is then done at maximum energy. This scheme has the potential to circumvent some of the most technically challenging aspects of current longitudinal matches; namely transporting a fully compressed, high peak current electron bunch through an extended SRF environment, the need for a RF harmonic linearizer and the need for a laser heater. Additional benefits include a substantial savings in capital and operational costs by efficiently using the available SRF gradient.
Date: September 1, 2011
Creator: C. Tennant, S.V. Benson, D. Douglas, P. Evtushenko, R.A. Legg
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fabrication and characterization of submicron polymer waveguides by micro-transfer molding

Description: Various methods exist for fabrication of micron and submicron sized waveguide structures. However, most of them include expensive and time consuming semiconductor fabrication techniques. An economical method for fabricating waveguide structures is introduced and demonstrated in this thesis. This method is established based on previously well-developed photonic crystal fabrication method called two-polymer microtransfer molding. The waveguide in this work functions by a coupler structure that diffracts the incident light into submicron polymer rods. The light is then guided through the rods. Characterization is done by collecting the light that has been guided through the waveguide and exits the end of these submicron polymer bars. The coupling and waveguiding capabilities are demonstrated using two light sources, a laser and white light.
Date: December 15, 2009
Creator: Wu, Te-Wei
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Recent Progress on High-Current SRF Cavities at Jlab

Description: JLab has designed and fabricated several prototype SRF cavities with cell shapes optimized for high current beams and with strong damping of unwanted higher order modes. We report on the latest test results of these cavities and on developments of concepts for new variants optimized for particular applications such as light sources and high-power proton accelerators, including betas less than one. We also report on progress towards a first beam test of this design in the recirculation loop of the JLab ERL based FEL. With growing interest worldwide in applications of SRF for high-average power electron and hadron machines, a practical test of these concepts is highly desirable. We plan to package two prototype cavities in a de-mountable cryomodule for temporary installation into the JLab FEL for testing with RF and beam. This will allow verification of all critical design and operational parameters paving the way to a full-scale prototype cryomodule.
Date: May 1, 2010
Creator: Robert Rimmer, William Clemens, James Henry, Peter Kneisel, Kurt Macha, Frank Marhauser, Larry Turlington, Haipeng Wang, Daniel Forehand
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A SYNCHRONIZED FIR/VUV LIGHT SOURCE AT JEFFERSON LAB

Description: We describe a dual free-electron laser (FEL) configuration on the UV Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab that allows simultaneous lasing at FIR/THz and UV wavelengths. The FIR/THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing nearly diffraction-limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The FIR source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. The coherent harmonics in the VUV from the UVFEL are out-coupled through a hole. The FIR source uses a shorter resonator with either hole or edge coupling to provide very high power FIR pulses. Simulations indicate excel-lent spectral brightness in the FIR region with over 100 W/cm-1 output.
Date: July 1, 2012
Creator: Stephen Benson, David Douglas, George Neil, Michelle D. Shinn, Gwyn Williams
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

COMPASS, the COMmunity Petascale project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, a board computational accelerator physics initiative

Description: Accelerators are the largest and most costly scientific instruments of the Department of Energy, with uses across a broad range of science, including colliders for particle physics and nuclear science and light sources and neutron sources for materials studies. COMPASS, the Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulation, is a broad, four-office (HEP, NP, BES, ASCR) effort to develop computational tools for the prediction and performance enhancement of accelerators. The tools being developed can be used to predict the dynamics of beams in the presence of optical elements and space charge forces, the calculation of electromagnetic modes and wake fields of cavities, the cooling induced by comoving beams, and the acceleration of beams by intense fields in plasmas generated by beams or lasers. In SciDAC-1, the computational tools had multiple successes in predicting the dynamics of beams and beam generation. In SciDAC-2 these tools will be petascale enabled to allow the inclusion of an unprecedented level of physics for detailed prediction.
Date: July 16, 2007
Creator: Cary, J.R.; Spentzouris, P.; Amundson, J.; McInnes, L.; Borland, M.; Mustapha, B. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department