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Strategic planning for automation within an information services department

Description: Today there is a growing trend within organizations for departments to become ''islands of mechanization.'' Departments compete for machine and personnel resources in order to develop individualistic, automated systems which frequently overlap in data content. To avoid this trend and prevent development of future ''islands,'' organizations must emphasize management of in-house information systems to improve the economy of operations, meet organizational objectives more effectively, and control operations more efficiently. The method by which these goals can be realized is formal planning. Planning for information systems becomes the key to the present and future. The longer planning is delayed, the more costly it will be to combine, modify, and standardize existing subsystems into an integrated systems design. There are many different types of plans which can be developed, e.g., short-, medium-, and long-term plans. However, long-term or strategic planning is the most important, as it determines an organization's major objectives. Once objectives have been defined, policies and strategies can be developed for resource allocation to meet those objectives. Action plans will implement the strategies and make the objectives become a reality. A plan for data processing support for the Information Services Department at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is described. The plan is an attempt to unify automation efforts within the Department and insure future planning. Department organization, concerns which led to plan development, background research which went into the plan, and, finally, the plan itself are described including major objectives, strategies, and plans of action.
Date: January 1, 1978
Creator: Cooper, P.P. & Hall, J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Industrial applications of computed tomography at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

Description: A research and development program was begun two years ago at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) to study nonmedical applications of computed tomography. This program had several goals. The first goal was to develop the necessary reconstruction algorithms to accurately reconstruct cross sections of nonmedical industrial objects. The second goal was to be able to perform extensive tomographic simulations to determine the efficacy of tomographic reconstruction with a variety of hardware configurations. The final goal was to construct an inexpensive industrial prototype scanner with a high degree of design flexibility. The implementation of these program goals is described.
Date: June 1, 1980
Creator: Kruger, R.P.; Morris, R.A.; Wecksung, G.W.; Wonn, G. & London, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Los Alamos tool-oriented software development methodology

Description: We present the details of a software development methodology which addresses all phases of the software development life cycle, yet is well suited for application by small projects with limited resources. The methodology has been developed at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) and was utilized during the recent development of the LANSCE Data Acquisition Command Language. The methodology employs a comprehensive set of software tools to support development and maintenance of exhaustive documentation for all software components. The impact of the methodology upon software quality and programmer productivity is assessed.
Date: January 1, 1985
Creator: Cort, G. & Nelson, R.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Los Alamos National Laboratory compliance with cultural resource management legislation

Description: Cultural resources management is one aspect of NEPA-induced legislation increasingly affecting federal land managers. A number of regulations, some of them recent, outline management criteria for protecting cultural resources on federal land. Nearly all construction projects at the 11,135 hectare Los Alamos National Laboratory in northern New Mexico are affected by cultural resource management requirements. A substantial prehistoric Puebloan population occupied the Laboratory area from the 13th to the early 16th centuries. Grazing, timbering, and homesteading followed Indian occupation. Therefore, archaeological and historical ruins and artifacts are abundant. The Laboratory has developed a cultural resources management program which meets both legal and project planning requirements. The program operates in coordination with the New Mexico State Historical Preservation Office. Major elements of the Laboratory program are illustrated by a current project involving relocation of a homesteader's cabin located on land required for a major new facility. The Laboratory cultural resource management program couples routine oversight of all engineering design projects with onsite resource surveys and necessary mitigation prior to construction. The Laboratory has successfully protected major archaeological and historical ruins, although some problems remain. The cultural resource program is intended to be adjustable to new needs. A cultural resource management plan will provide long-term management guidance.
Date: January 1, 1984
Creator: Olinger, C.E. & Rea, K.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Change Control of software at LANL

Description: Change Control is the process by which the Computing and Communications Division (C Division) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) updates software and hardware used by its customers. This paper concentrates on the control of changes to user-level software, such as languages, libraries, and utilities. It describes how these changes are documented and how automated tools have been and are being incorporated into the change control procedures to improve efficiency. 5 figs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Coleman, J.B.; Pfaff, R.T. & Cohen, M.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of FMS versus TDMS applications

Description: A business application which uses forms management is described. The screen format, data dictionary, dataflow diagrams, minispecs, and structured design chart are included to provide the description of this application. It is implemented using TDMS and FMS in separate applications. Examples of code are included showing both methods of implementation. Finally, a comparison of FMS features and TDMS features is done, indicating that the nature of the application and also the environment under which the application will be used and maintained dictates which form product would be more suitable.
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Werner, N.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Study of the nocturnal drainage flow over a sloping plateau in north-central New Mexico

Description: This paper analyzes the drainage winds at Los Alamos. In addition, other local winds at Los Alamos are discussed: (1) upslope wind, (2) mountain-valley wind, (3) downslope flow due to terrain-forced thunderstorms, and (4) strong nighttime winds due to inversion decoupling.
Date: January 1, 1981
Creator: Bowen, B.M.; Dewart, J.M. & Fernald, F.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

E-Division semiannual report. Progress report, July 1--December 31, 1978

Description: The status of the programs and projects of the Electronics Division for the period July through December 1978 is reported. The presentation is divided into three sections: Research, Engineering Support, and Technical Services. Each of these sections presents the activities and accomplishments of the corresponding branch within the Division. The primary goal of the Research and Development branch is to advance technology for future applications. The primary goal of the Engineering Support Branch is to apply advanced technology to Laboratory and material problems. The primary goal of the Technical Services Branch is to provide a technical base and support for Laboratory programs. Most of the individual reports are quite short.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Kelley, P.A. (comp.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

History of remote handling at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

Description: The handling of high levels of radioactive materials began at Los Alamos in 1944 with the receipt of /sup 140/Ba sources that were milked to extract the /sup 140/La daughter for use as a tracer in hydrodynamical experiments. Remote-handling techniques and facilities have been used to support research programs in reactor development and radiochemistry, and in support of an accelerator.
Date: January 1, 1979
Creator: Wilson, M.T.; Wood, W.T. & Barnes, J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Graphic artist in computerland

Description: The field of computer graphics is rapidly opening up to the graphic artist. It is not necessary to be a programming expert to enter this fascinating world. The capabilities of the medium are astounding: neon and metallic effects, translucent plastic and clear glass effects, sensitive 3-D shadings, limitless textures, and above all color. As with any medium, computer graphics has its advantages, such as speed, ease of form manipulation, and a variety of type fonts and alphabets. It also has its limitations, such as data input time, final output turnaround time, and not necessarily being the right medium for the job at hand. And finally, it is the time- and cost-saving characteristics of computer-generated visuals, opposed to original artwork, that make computer graphics a viable alternative. This paper focuses on parts of the computer graphics system in use at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to provide specific examples.
Date: January 1, 1983
Creator: Dolberg, K.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development methodology for scientific software

Description: We present the details of a software development methodology that addresses all phases of the software life cycle, yet is well suited for application by small projects with limited resources. The methodology has been developed at the Los Alamos Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility and was utilized during the recent development of the WNR Data Acquisition Command Language. The methodology emphasizes the development and maintenance of comprehensive documentation for all software components. The impact of the methodology upon software quality and programmer productivity is assessed.
Date: January 1, 1985
Creator: Cort, G.; Goldstone, J.A.; Nelson, R.O.; Poore, R.V.; Miller, L. & Barrus, D.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department