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Some Engineering Problems of the Panama Canal in Their Relation to Geology and Topography

Description: Report issued by the Bureau of Mines over issues encountered during construction of the Panama Canal. As stated in the introduction, "this report aims to discuss, from the viewpoint of the mining geologist, the bearing of topographic and geologic conditions on certain problems that arose in the construction of the Panama Canal" (p. 7). This report includes tables, maps, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: August 1915
Creator: MacDonald, Donald F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Vaiont Slide: A Geotechnical Analysis Based on New Geologic Observations of the Failure Surface, Volume 1: Main Text

Description: First part of a final report describing "efforts to confirm the existence and nature of clay seams in the [Vaiont Slide] mass and to confirm the possible existence of an 'old' slide at the site. These efforts were made by (a) firsthand field observations of the geology, (b) an examination of preslide and postslide airphotographs, (c) laboratory testing of samples of failure plane materials, and (d) and examination and translation of geologic and other documents related to preslide and postslide conditions" (abstract, para. 2). The report also presents stability analyses of the Vaiont Slide.
Date: June 1985
Creator: Hendron, A. J., Jr. & Patton, F. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Vaiont Slide: A Geotechnical Analysis Based on New Geologic Observations of the Failure Surface, Volume 2: Appendicies A Through G

Description: Second part of a final report containing appendices to accompany a study describing "efforts to confirm the existence and nature of clay seams in the [Vaiont Slide] mass and to confirm the possible existence of an 'old' slide at the site. These efforts were made by (a) firsthand field observations of the geology, (b) an examination of preslide and postslide airphotographs, (c) laboratory testing of samples of failure plane materials, and (d) and examination and translation of geologic and other documents related to preslide and postslide conditions" (abstract, para. 2, Volume 1).
Date: June 1985
Creator: Hendron, A. J., Jr. & Patton, F. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Landslides in Colluvium

Description: From introduction: This report describes the Delhi Pike area, which is an area of landsliding we believe to be representative of landslides in colluvium throughout the Cincinnati metropolitan area. The area has been the focus of several detailed studies reported in other chapters in this bulletin. The purpose of the report is to describe the physical setting and movement styles of the landslides and, thus, to provide a context for the more narrowly focused chapters that follow.
Date: 1994
Creator: Fleming, Robert W. & Johnson, Arvid M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Past, Present, Future Erosion at Locke Island

Description: This report describes and documents the erosion that has occurred along the northeast side of Locke Island over the last 10 to 20 years. The principal cause of this erosion is the massive Locke Island landslide complex opposite the Columbia River along the White Bluffs, which constricts the flow of the river and deflects the river's thalweg southward against the island.
Date: August 8, 2006
Creator: Bjornstad, Bruce N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HYDROGEOLOGY OF THE THERMAL LANDSLIDE

Description: The large Thermal Landslide overlies the initial area of geothermal development at The Geysers. The landslide is waterbearing while the underlying Franciscan formation bedrock units are essentially non-waterbearing except where affected by hydrothermal alteration. Perched ground water moving through the landslide is heated prior to discharge as spring flow.
Date: January 22, 1985
Creator: Vantine, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Stability of submerged slopes on the flanks of the Hawaiian Islands, a simplified approach

Description: Undersea transmission lines and shoreline AC-DC conversion stations and near-shore transmission lines are being considered as part of a system for transporting energy between the Hawaiian Islands. These facilities will need to be designed so that they will not be damaged or destroyed by coastal or undersea landslides. Advanced site surveys and engineering design of these facilities will require detailed site specific analyses, including sediment sampling and laboratory testing of samples, in situ testing of sediment and rock, detailed charting of bathymetry, and two- or three-dimensional numerical analyses of the factors of safety of the slopes against failure from the various possible loading mechanisms. An intermediate approximate approach can be followed that involves gravity and piston cores, laboratory testing and the application of simplified models to determine a seismic angle of repose for actual sediment in the vicinity of the planned facility. An even simpler and more approximate approach involves predictions of angles of repose using classification of the sediment along a proposed route as either a coarse volcaniclastic sand, a calcareous ooze, or a muddy terrigenous sediment. The steepest slope that such a sediment can maintain is the static angle of repose. Sediment may be found on slopes as steep as these, but it must be considered metastable and liable to fail in the event of any disturbance, storm or earthquake. The seismic angle of repose likely governs most slopes on the Hawaiian Ridge. This declivity corresponds to the response of the slope to a continuing seismic environment. As a long history of earthquakes affects the slopes, they gradually flatten to this level. Slopes that exceed or roughly equal this value can be considered at risk to fail during future earthquakes. Seismic and static angles of repose for three sediment types are tabulated in this report.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Lee, H.J.; Torresan, M.E. & McArthur, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Landslides and other mass movements near TA-33, northern White Rock Canyon, New Mexico. Final report

Description: Massive slump complexes and at least two rock avalanches flank the eastern rim of the Pajarito Plateau along northern White Rock Canyon, north of TA-33. Landslides failed along mechanically weak rocks in the Santa Fe Group, within the Puye Formation, or in Pliocene alluvial and lacustrine units. The landslides are mainly of early or middle Pleistocene age. The toe area of at least,one slump complex has been active in the late Pleistocene, damming White Rock Canyon near the mouth of Water Canyon. Lacustrine sediment that filled this lake, or series of lakes, to an elevation of at least 1710 m is preserved at a number of upstream sites, including a deposit near the Buckman townsite that exposes 30 m of lacustrine sediment. Charcoal collected at several sites has been submitted for {sup 14}C dating. Landslides, however, probably do not represent a significant short-term threat to the material disposal areas at TA-33. Bedrock that lies beneath the TA-33 mesa is relatively stable, the mesa shows no signs of incipient failure, and past periods of slide activity were responses to rapid downcutting of the Rio Grande and climate change, probably over periods of several decades, at least. Rockfall and headward erosion of gullies do not represent significant decadal hazards on canyon rims near TA-33. Gully migration near MDA-K is a potential threat, but the gullies were not examined in detail. A system of north-trending faults, at least one of which displays Pleistocene activity, bisects the TA-33 mesa. If these faults are capable of producing significant seismic shaking, generalizations about landslide and rockfall hazards must be reevaluated.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Dethier, D. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Annotated bibliography: Marine geologic hazards of the Hawaiian Islands with special focus on submarine slides and turbidity currents

Description: This annotated bibliography was compiled to highlight the submarine geology of the Hawaiian Islands and identify known and potential marine geologic hazards with special emphasis on turbidity currents, submarine slides and tsunamis. Some references are included that are not specific to Hawaii but are needed to understand the geologic processes that can affect the integrity of submarine cables and other man-made structures. Entries specific to the Hawaiian Island area are shown in bold type.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Normark, W. R. & Herring, H. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental Resources of Selected Areas of Hawaii: Geological Hazards (DRAFT)

Description: This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 1994 (Fed Regis. 5925638) withdrawing its Notice of Intent (Fed Regis. 575433) of February 14, 1992, to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publications and open-file reports. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift, and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis). First, overviews of volcanic and earthquake activity, and details of offshore geologic hazards is provided for the Hawaiian Islands. Then, a more detailed discussion of onshore geologic hazards is presented with special emphasis on the southern third of Hawaii and the east rift zone of ...
Date: June 1, 1994
Creator: Staub, W.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Landslide remediation on Ohio State Route 83 using clean coal combustion by-products

Description: In the present work, a flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-product was used to reconstruct the failed portion of a highway embankment. The construction process and the stability of the repaired embankment are examined. State Route 83 in Cumberland, Ohio has been damaged by a slow moving slide which has forced the Ohio Department of Transportation to repair the roadway several times. In the most recent repair FGD by-products obtained from American Electric Power`s Tidd PFBC plant were used to construct a wall through the failure plane to prevent further slippage. In order to evaluate the utility of using coal combustion by-products in this type of highway project the site was divided into three test sections. In the first repair section, natural soil removed form the slide area was recompacted and replaced according to standard ODOT construction practices. In the second section the natural soil was field mixed with the Tidd PFBC ash in approximately equal proportions. The third section was all Tidd ash. The three test sections were capped by a layer of compacted Tidd ash or crushed stone to provide a wearing surface to allow ODOT to open the roadway before applying a permanent asphalt surface. Measurement of slope movement as well as water levels and quality have begun at the site in order to evaluate long term project performance. The completion of this project should lead to increased acceptance of FGD materials in construction projects. Monetary savings will be realized in avoiding some of the disposal costs for the waste, as well as in the reduced reliance on alternative engineering materials.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Payette, R.; Chen, X.Y.; Wolfe, W. & Beeghly, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental impacts during geothermal development: Some examples from Central America

Description: The impacts of geothermal development projects are usually positive. However, without appropriate monitoring plans and mitigation actions firmly incorporated into the project planning process, there exists the potential for significant negative environmental impacts. The authors present five examples from Central America of environmental impacts associated with geothermal development activities. These brief case studies describe landslide hazards, waste brine disposal, hydrothermal explosions, and air quality issues. Improved Environmental Impact Assessments are needed to assist the developing nations of the region to judiciously address the environmental consequences associated with geothermal development.
Date: April 1, 1997
Creator: Goff, S. & Goff, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Geological hazards

Description: This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on geologic hazards during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. The US Department of Energy (DOE) published a notice withdrawing its Notice of Intent to prepare the HGP-EIS. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. This report presents a review of current information on geologic hazards in the Hawaiian Islands. Interrelationships among these hazards are discussed. Probabilities of occurrence of given geologic hazards are provided in various regions where sufficient geologic or historical data are available. Most of the information contained herein is compiled from recent US Geological Survey (USGS) publications and USGS open-file reports related to this project. This report describes the natural geologic hazards present in the area and does not represent an assessment of environmental impacts. Geologic hazards originate both onshore and offshore. Onshore geologic hazards such as volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, surface rupture, landslides, uplift and subsidence occur mainly on the southern third of the island of Hawaii (hereinafter referred to as Hawaii). Offshore geologic hazards are more widely distributed throughout the Hawaiian Islands. Examples of offshore geologic hazards are submarine landslides, turbidity currents, and seismic sea waves (tsunamis).
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Staub, W.P. & Reed, R.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The 1983 Temperature Gradient and Heat Flow Drilling Project for the State of Washington

Description: During the Summer of 1983, the Washington Division of Geology and Earth Resources carried out a three-hole drilling program to collect temperature gradient and heat flow information near potential geothermal resource target areas. The project was part of the state-coupled US Department of Energy Geothermal Program. Richardson Well Drilling of Tacoma, Washington was subcontracted through the State to perform the work. The general locations of the project areas are shown in figure 1. The first hole, DNR 83-1, was located within the Green River valley northwest of Mount St. Helens. This site is near the Green River Soda Springs and along the projection of the Mount St. Helens--Elk Lake seismic zone. The other two holes were drilled near Mount Baker. Hole DNR 83-3 was sited about 1/4 km west of the Baker Hot Springs, 10.5 km east of Mount Baker, while hole DNR 83-5 was located along Rocky Creek in the Sulphur Creek Valley. The Rocky Creek hole is about 10 km south-southwest of the peak. Two other holes, DNR 83-2 and DNR 83-4, were located on the north side of the Sulphur Creek Valley. Both holes were abandoned at early stages of drilling because of deep overburden and severe caving problems. The sites were apparently located atop old landslide deposits.
Date: November 1, 1983
Creator: Korosec, Michael A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. Geologic factors in the isolation of nuclear waste: evaluation of long-term geomorphic processes and catastrophic events

Description: SRI International has projected the rate, duration, and magnitude of geomorphic processes and events in the Southwest and Gulf Coast over the next million years. This information will be used by the Department of Energy`s Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as input to a computer model, which will be used to simulate possible release scenarios and the consequences of the release of nuclear waste from geologic containment. The estimates in this report, although based on best scientific judgment, are subject to considerable uncertainty. An evaluation of the Quaternary history of the two study areas revealed that each had undergone geomorphic change in the last one million years. Catastrophic events were evaluated in order to determine their significance to the simulation model. Given available data, catastrophic floods are not expected to occur in the two study areas. Catastrophic landslides may occur in the Southwest, but because the duration of the event is brief and the amount of material moved is small in comparison to regional denudation, such events need not be included in the simulation model. Ashfalls, however, could result in removal of vegetation from the landscape, thereby causing significant increases in erosion rates. Because the estimates developed during this study may not be applicable to specific sites, general equations were presented as a first step in refining the analysis. These equations identify the general relationships among the important variables and suggest those areas of concern for which further data are required. If the current model indicates that geomorphic processes (taken together with other geologic changes) may ultimately affect the geologic containment of nuclear waste, further research may be necessary to refine this analysis for application to specific sites.
Date: March 1980
Creator: Mara, S. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[News Script: Motel faces cave-in threat]

Description: Script from the WBAP-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, covering a news story about heavy rains threatening to erode the earth under a motel building adjacent to a construction excavation project for the Fort Worth-Dallas toll road.
Date: June 15, 1957
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Preliminary geologic map of the geysers steam field and vicinity, Sonoma County, California

Description: The map symbols include: contact; axis of syncline; axis of anticline; fault; thrust fault; scarp line; landslide deposit; sag pond; hot spring; spring; and zone of hydrothermally altered rock. The attitude of planar surfaces is also indicated. Stratigraphic units are indicated. A generalized geologic map showing major faults and structural units of the Geysers area is included. (JGB)
Date: January 1, 1974
Creator: McLaughlin, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aerial photographic interpretation of lineaments and faults in late Cenozoic deposits in the eastern parts of the Saline Valley 1:100, 000 quadrangle, Nevada and California, and the Darwin Hills 1:100, 000 quadrangle, California

Description: Faults and fault-related lineaments in Quaternary and late Tertiary deposits in the southern part of the Walker Lane are potentially active and form patterns that are anomalous compared to those in most other areas of the Great Basin. Two maps at a scale of 1:100,000 summarize information about lineaments and faults in the area around and southwest of the Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system based on extensive aerial-photo interpretation, limited field interpretation, limited field investigations, and published geologic maps. There are three major fault zones and two principal faults in the Saline Valley and Darwin Hills 1:100,000 quadrangles. (1) The Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system and (2) the Hunter Mountain fault zone are northwest-trending right-lateral strike-slip fault zones. (3) The Panamint Valley fault zone and associated Towne Pass and Emigrant faults are north-trending normal faults. The intersection of the Hunter Mountain and Panamint Valley fault zones is marked by a large complex of faults and lineaments on the floor of Panamint Valley. Additional major faults include (4) the north-northwest-trending Ash Hill fault on the west side of Panamint Valley, and (5) the north-trending range-front Tin Mountain fault on the west side of the northern Cottonwood Mountains. The most active faults at present include those along the Death Valley-Furnace Creek fault system, the Tin Mountain fault, the northwest and southeast ends of the Hunter Mountain fault zone, the Ash Hill fault, and the fault bounding the west side of the Panamint Range south of Hall Canyon. Several large Quaternary landslides on the west sides of the Cottonwood Mountains and the Panamint Range apparently reflect slope instability due chiefly to rapid uplift of these ranges. 16 refs.
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Reheis, M.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department