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The National Labor Relations Board's Interpretation of Interference, Restraint and Coercion

Description: This study will endeavor to present an analysis of the process in which the National Labor Relations Board gave specific meaning to "interfere with, restrain or coerce" found in section 8(1) of the National Labor Relations Act of 1935. Under Section 8(1) of the Act, the Labor Board, subject to judicial review, has the authority to declare illegal any management procedure which in its opinion involves interference, restraint or coercion.
Date: 1954
Creator: Harding, Edward Keith
Partner: UNT Libraries

Airline Labor Relations: Information on Trends and Impact of Labor Actions

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "Labor negotiations in the airline industry fall under the Railway Labor Act. Under this act, airline labor contracts do not expire, but instead, become amendable. To help labor and management reach agreement before a strike occurs, the act also provides a process--including possible intervention by the President--that is designed to reduce the incidence of strikes. Despite these provisions, negotiations between airlines and their unions have sometimes been contentious, and strikes have occurred. Because air transportation is such a vital link in the nation's economic infrastructure, a strike at a major U.S. airline may exert a significant economic impact on affected communities. Additionally, if an airline's labor and management were to engage in contentious and prolonged negotiations, the airline's operations--and customer service--could suffer. GAO was asked to examine trends in airline labor negotiations in the 25 years since the industry was deregulated in 1978, the impact of airline strikes on communities, and the impact of lengthy contract negotiations and nonstrike work actions (such as "sickouts") on passengers."
Date: June 13, 2003
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Congressional Proposals Dealing With National Emergency Strikes

Description: This report describes how national emergency strikes have been dealt with under the Labor Management Relations Act (Taft-Hartley Act) and the Railway Labor Act. The report also describes bills being put into the House and the Senate that deal with strikes, and information about each.
Date: 1970
Creator: House Republican Research Committee Task Force
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Union Representation Votes and Job Satisfaction

Description: Why do employees vote for or against union representation? A survey of the scholarly literature and an investigation of National Labor Relations Board sponsored elections among Southern industrial workers were conducted to help answer this question. Four hypotheses were proposed to reveal the most important factors. No universally applicable laws were developed by the dissertation study. Although the hypotheses were supported, the response rate was very low in the field research study of sensitive issues. The field research did provide additional empirical evidence to support most of the previous research studies concerning union representation election voting behavior.
Date: August 1980
Creator: Baldwin, Lee Elliott
Partner: UNT Libraries

Are self-directed work teams successful and effective tools for today`s organization?

Description: The purpose of this research is to (1) show the effectiveness and success of self-directed work teams within the organization, (2) emphasize the importance of team building in the success of the team, and (3) assist organizations in building self-directed work teams. The researcher used a direct survey and studied the following team building techniques: (1) Is the team`s mission clearly defined to each team member? (2) Are the goals clearly defined and achievable by all team members? (3) Will empowerment (decision-making power) be given equally to all team members? (4) Will open and honest communication be allowed among team members? (5) Will each team member be respected and valued for his/her position on the team? (6) Are self-directed work teams effectively rewarded for accomplishments? (7) Have team members received adequate training to effectively complete their job tasks? Upon completion of the literature review and statistical data, and after analyzing the seven areas of team building techniques, it was determined three of the four teams were successful and effective. The only area of concern to the organization is that the participants felt they did not have true ownership of their teams; that is, team members were not given full empowerment. According to this study and the review of literature, full empowerment must be given to achieve successful and effective teams. If true empowerment is not given, the team will suffer in other areas of team building, and the organization will lose a valuable tool.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Arnwine, A.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Failure of the Labor Management Relations Act to Protect Bargaining Rights of Newly Certified Unions

Description: The purpose of this study is twofold. First, it will examine employer techniques used to thwart the rights of newly certified unions. Second, this study will attempt to determine the effectiveness of the Act's remedies. Some statistical characteristics of cases and firms involved in violations of the duty to bargain collectively will be evaluated. Statistics from the Board's annual reports as well as from a recent study by Philip Ross will be used. The increase of Board cases dealing with violations of refusal to bargain, the average number of violations per case, and the prevalence of other unfair labor practices will be examined. The size of firms committing the majority of violations of collective bargaining will be compared with the size of firms involved in the majority of Board certification elections. National Labor Relations Board, circuit court of appeals, and Supreme Court cases will be used to investigate the effectiveness of three of the most prevalent violations of the duty to bargain collectively used by employers to circumvent the purposes of the Act. They are (1) refusal to meet with the newly certified union, (2) engaging in unilateral activity, and (3) refusal to bargain in good faith. This study will also examine the effectiveness of the remedies of the Labor Management Relations Act in protecting the worker's right to bargain collectively with his employer through representatives of his own choosing. Four of the standard Board remedies will be examined---(1) posting of notices, (2) reinstatement of employees discriminated against, (3) payment of back pay, and (4) a Board order to bargain in good faith.
Date: January 1969
Creator: Rooth, Stewart Richard
Partner: UNT Libraries

Audit unto others{hor_ellipsis}

Description: My first encounter with a quality assurance auditor is reminiscent of an old Dodge commercial. You remember? The old sheriff, masked in mirrored sunglasses, paunch hanging over his gun belt, prophesying, ``You`re in a heap o` trouble boy!`` Well, my auditor could have been kin to the sheriff; they had the same posture, attitude, and mirrored sunglasses. Plus, my auditor wore a black leather vest and sported a ``Buffalo Bill`` goatee. While certainly memorable, both gentlemen were far from pleasant. I`m fairly certain that the compliance auditor of old deserved this perceived association with his law enforcement counterpart. Both believed in enforcing the letter of the law, or their interpretations of it. Neither seemed capable of exercising interpretive powers, but instead relied on winning through intimidation, possibly with an eye toward claiming some version of a monthly Quota Award. Is the auditor of today any better perceived? Because this ``first encounter of the worst kind`` made a lasting impression on me, I have dedicated considerable time and effort trying to avoid being perceived as another sheriff when I conduct audits. In my auditing career, I am determined to capitalize on each opportunity to turn negative situations, as experienced by the auditee, into meaningful opportunities for improved performance. I want to treat the auditee the way I want to be treated when I am being audited. (author)
Date: May 1, 1992
Creator: Maday, J. H. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Audit unto others hor ellipsis

Description: My first encounter with a quality assurance auditor is reminiscent of an old Dodge commercial. You remember The old sheriff, masked in mirrored sunglasses, paunch hanging over his gun belt, prophesying, You're in a heap o' trouble boy '' Well, my auditor could have been kin to the sheriff; they had the same posture, attitude, and mirrored sunglasses. Plus, my auditor wore a black leather vest and sported a Buffalo Bill'' goatee. While certainly memorable, both gentlemen were far from pleasant. I'm fairly certain that the compliance auditor of old deserved this perceived association with his law enforcement counterpart. Both believed in enforcing the letter of the law, or their interpretations of it. Neither seemed capable of exercising interpretive powers, but instead relied on winning through intimidation, possibly with an eye toward claiming some version of a monthly Quota Award. Is the auditor of today any better perceived Because this first encounter of the worst kind'' made a lasting impression on me, I have dedicated considerable time and effort trying to avoid being perceived as another sheriff when I conduct audits. In my auditing career, I am determined to capitalize on each opportunity to turn negative situations, as experienced by the auditee, into meaningful opportunities for improved performance. I want to treat the auditee the way I want to be treated when I am being audited. (author)
Date: May 1, 1992
Creator: Maday, J.H. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Teamwork and diversity: A survey at Sandia National Laboratories

Description: In September, 1994, Sandia`s Diversity Leadership and Education Outreach Center arid the Corporate Diversity Team commissioned a Diversity Action Team (DAT-Phase II) to address the area of team- work. The goal of this DAT was to identify ways to capitalize on the diversity of people to enhance team success at Sandia. Given a six- month lifetime and funding levels of 12 hours per person per month, we chose to accomplish our goal by gathering and analyzing data on the performance and diversity of Sandia teams and publishing this report of our findings. The work presented herein builds on earlier work of this team.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Apodaca, T.; Berman, M.; Griego, C.; Jansma, R.; Leatherwood, M.; Lovato, L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

International Power Institute`s quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1998

Description: The International Power Institute (IPI) at Morehouse College has organized a team to design and create a Short Term Training Program for ESKOM Union Leaders which will last four weeks and take place at a location in South Africa to be designated by ESKOM. This proposal envisions a group of no more than 25 union leaders to be trained at the same time but the program could be expanded to accommodate up to 40 trainees. The program is designed around interactive training with lectures followed by discussion, case studies, trainee work groups, homework assignments and two field study visits. Also, the program is designed to have a number of ESKOM management people join the course for one day in the second week and one day at the end, in each case after a half day of preparation in separate sessions from the union leaders, to share with the trainees expectations and, at the end of the program, their course experiences. In addition, IPI has prepared a follow on proposal for a Long Term Training Program. This LT program is specified in less detail but can be expanded based on future discussions with ESKOM management. The training program is designed with the following objectives: determine and identify the most pressing problems facing ESKOM Union Leadership in their relationship with management; instill in the union leadership a heightened sense of purpose and willingness to take ownership of a process that will increase effective outcomes of meaningful, good faith bargaining; develop skills and experience leading to improved union administration; enhance realistic expectations and improve process knowledge to facilitate future labor negotiations and grievance proceedings; and provide participants with enhanced skills and knowledge to develop and/or strengthen a functioning, democratic work culture and structure internal to the union.
Date: October 30, 1998
Creator: Coles, J.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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