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Central Solenoid Insert Technical Specification

Description: The US ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for the ITER central solenoid (CS) contribution to the ITER project. The Central Solenoid Insert (CSI) project will allow ITER validation the appropriate lengths of the conductors to be used in the full-scale CS coils under relevant conditions. The ITER Program plans to build and test a CSI to verify the performance of the CS conductor. The CSI is a one-layer solenoid with an inner diameter of 1.48 m and a height of 4.45 m between electric terminal ends. The coil weight with the terminals is approximately 820 kg without insulation. The major goal of the CSI is to measure the temperature margin of the CS under the ITER direct current (DC) operating conditions, including determining sensitivity to load cycles. Performance of the joints, ramp rate sensitivity, and stability against thermal or electromagnetic disturbances, electrical insulation, losses, and instrumentation are addressed separately and therefore are not major goals in this project. However, losses and joint performance will be tested during the CSI testing campaign. The USIPO will build the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Japan. The industrial vendors (the Suppliers) will report to the USIPO (the Company). All approvals to proceed will be issued by the Company, which in some cases, as specified in this document, will also require the approval of the ITER Organization. Responsibilities and obligations will be covered by respective contracts between the USIPO, called Company interchangeably, and the industrial Prime Contractors, called Suppliers. Different stages of work may be performed by more than one Prime Contractor, as described in this specification. Technical requirements of the contract between the Company and the Prime Contractor will be covered by the Fabrication Specifications developed ...
Date: September 1, 2011
Creator: Martovetsky, Nicolai N & Smirnov, Alexandre
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

JAEA Fatigue Analysis of EBR-II Duplex Tubing

Description: This work addresses questions brought up concerning the mechanisms associated with fatigue crack growth retardation and/or arrest within the nickel bond layer in duplex 2¼ Cr-1Mo steel superheater tubes. Previous work performed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) indicated that the nickel bond layer did not function as a crack arrestor during fatigue crack propagation with the exception of one, isolated case involving an exceptionally low fatigue load and a high temperature (400 0C) environment. Since it is atypical for a fatigue crack to propagate from a relatively soft material (the nickel bond layer) to a harder material (the 2¼ Cr-1Mo steel) there has been speculation that the nickel bond layer was hardened in service. Additionally, there are questions surrounding the nature of the fatigue crack propagation within the nickel bond layer; specifically with regard to the presence of voids seen on micrographs of the bond layer and oxidation within the steel along the edge of the nickel bond layer. There is uncertainty as to the effect of these voids and/or oxide barriers with respect to potential fatigue crack arrest.
Date: July 1, 2009
Creator: Jackson, J. H.; Porter, D. L. & Lloyd, W. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sodium fast reactor gaps analysis of computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety.

Description: This report summarizes the results of an expert-opinion elicitation activity designed to qualitatively assess the status and capabilities of currently available computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety calculations of advanced sodium fast reactors, and identify important gaps. The twelve-member panel consisted of representatives from five U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, and BNL), the University of Wisconsin, the KAERI, the JAEA, and the CEA. The major portion of this elicitation activity occurred during a two-day meeting held on Aug. 10-11, 2010 at Argonne National Laboratory. There were two primary objectives of this work: (1) Identify computer codes currently available for SFR accident analysis and reactor safety calculations; and (2) Assess the status and capability of current US computer codes to adequately model the required accident scenarios and associated phenomena, and identify important gaps. During the review, panel members identified over 60 computer codes that are currently available in the international community to perform different aspects of SFR safety analysis for various event scenarios and accident categories. A brief description of each of these codes together with references (when available) is provided. An adaptation of the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) for computational modeling and simulation is described for use in this work. The panel's assessment of the available US codes is presented in the form of nine tables, organized into groups of three for each of three risk categories considered: anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), design basis accidents (DBA), and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). A set of summary conclusions are drawn from the results obtained. At the highest level, the panel judged that current US code capabilities are adequate for licensing given reasonable margins, but expressed concern that US code development activities had stagnated and that the experienced user-base and the experimental validation base was ...
Date: June 1, 2011
Creator: Carbajo, Juan (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL) et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

Description: Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.
Date: May 1, 2012
Creator: Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use and Storage of Test and Operations Data from the High Temperature Test Reactor Acquired by the US Government from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency

Description: This document describes the use and storage of data from the High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR) acquired from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) by the U.S. Government for high temperature reactor research under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project.
Date: February 1, 2010
Creator: Gougar, Hans
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Future Transient Testing of Advanced Fuels

Description: The transient in-reactor fuels testing workshop was held on May 4–5, 2009 at Idaho National Laboratory. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a forum where technical experts in transient testing of nuclear fuels could meet directly with technical instrumentation experts and nuclear fuel modeling and simulation experts to discuss needed advancements in transient testing to support a basic understanding of nuclear fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. The workshop was attended by representatives from Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique CEA, Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Department of Energy (DOE), AREVA, General Electric – Global Nuclear Fuels (GE-GNF), Westinghouse, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), universities, and several DOE national laboratories. Transient testing of fuels and materials generates information required for advanced fuels in future nuclear power plants. Future nuclear power plants will rely heavily on advanced computer modeling and simulation that describes fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. TREAT is an ideal facility for this testing because of its flexibility, proven operation and material condition. The opportunity exists to develop advanced instrumentation and data collection that can support modeling and simulation needs much better than was possible in the past. In order to take advantage of these opportunities, test programs must be carefully designed to yield basic information to support modeling before conducting integral performance tests. An early start of TREAT and operation at low power would provide significant dividends in training, development of instrumentation, and checkout of reactor systems. Early start of TREAT (2015) is needed to support the requirements of potential users of TREAT and include the testing of full length fuel irradiated in the FFTF reactor. The capabilities provided by TREAT are needed for the development of nuclear power and the following benefits will be realized by the refurbishment and restart of TREAT. •TREAT is an absolute necessity in ...
Date: September 1, 2009
Creator: Carmack, Jon
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development and Verification of Tritium Analyses Code for a Very High Temperature Reactor

Description: A tritium permeation analyses code (TPAC) has been developed by Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of analyzing tritium distributions in the VHTR systems including integrated hydrogen production systems. A MATLAB SIMULINK software package was used for development of the code. The TPAC is based on the mass balance equations of tritium-containing species and a various form of hydrogen (i.e., HT, H2, HTO, HTSO4, and TI) coupled with a variety of tritium source, sink, and permeation models. In the TPAC, ternary fission and neutron reactions with 6Li, 7Li 10B, 3He were taken into considerations as tritium sources. Purification and leakage models were implemented as main tritium sinks. Permeation of HT and H2 through pipes, vessels, and heat exchangers were importantly considered as main tritium transport paths. In addition, electroyzer and isotope exchange models were developed for analyzing hydrogen production systems including both high-temperature electrolysis and sulfur-iodine process. The TPAC has unlimited flexibility for the system configurations, and provides easy drag-and-drops for making models by adopting a graphical user interface. Verification of the code has been performed by comparisons with the analytical solutions and the experimental data based on the Peach Bottom reactor design. The preliminary results calculated with a former tritium analyses code, THYTAN which was developed in Japan and adopted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency were also compared with the TPAC solutions. This report contains descriptions of the basic tritium pathways, theory, simple user guide, verifications, sensitivity studies, sample cases, and code tutorials. Tritium behaviors in a very high temperature reactor/high temperature steam electrolysis system have been analyzed by the TPAC based on the reference indirect parallel configuration proposed by Oh et al. (2007). This analysis showed that only 0.4% of tritium released from the core is transferred to the product hydrogen. The amount of tritium in the product ...
Date: September 1, 2009
Creator: Oh, Chang H. & Kim, Eung S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ELECTRONICS UPGRADE TO THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY COULOMETER FOR PLUTONIUM AND NEPTUNIUM ASSAY

Description: The Savannah River Site (SRS) has the analytical measurement capability to perform high-precision plutonium concentration measurements by controlled-potential coulometry. State-of-the-art controlled-potential coulometers were designed and fabricated by the Savannah River National Laboratory and installed in the Analytical Laboratories process control laboratory. The Analytical Laboratories uses coulometry for routine accountability measurements of and for verification of standard preparations used to calibrate other plutonium measurement systems routinely applied to process control, nuclear safety, and other accountability applications. The SRNL Coulometer has a demonstrated measurement reliability of {approx}0.05% for 10 mg samples. The system has also been applied to the characterization of neptunium standard solutions with a comparable reliability. The SRNL coulometer features: a patented current integration system; continuous electrical calibration versus Faraday's Constants and Ohm's Law; the control-potential adjustment technique for enhanced application of the Nernst Equation; a wide operating room temperature range; and a fully automated instrument control and data acquisition capability. Systems have been supplied to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Russia, Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL). The most recent vintage of electronics was based on early 1990's integrated circuits. Many of the components are no longer available. At the request of the IAEA and the Department of State, SRNL has completed an electronics upgrade of their controlled-potential coulometer design. Three systems have built with the new design, one for the IAEA which was installed at SAL in May 2011, one system for Los Alamos National Laboratory, (LANL) and one for the SRS Analytical Laboratory. The LANL and SRS systems are undergoing startup testing with installation scheduled for this summer.
Date: July 8, 2011
Creator: Cordaro, J.; Holland, M.; Reeves, G.; Nichols, S. & Kruzner, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

EVALUATION OF ZERO-POWER, ELEVATED-TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS AT JAPAN’S HIGH TEMPERATURE ENGINEERING TEST REACTOR

Description: The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor that was constructed with the objectives to establish and upgrade the technological basis for advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) as well as to conduct various irradiation tests for innovative high-temperature research. The core size of the HTTR represents about one-half of that of future HTGRs, and the high excess reactivity of the HTTR, necessary for compensation of temperature, xenon, and burnup effects during power operations, is similar to that of future HTGRs. During the start-up core physics tests of the HTTR, various annular cores were formed to provide experimental data for verification of design codes for future HTGRs. The experimental benchmark performed and currently evaluated in this report pertains to the data available for two zero-power, warm-critical measurements with the fully-loaded HTTR core. Six isothermal temperature coefficients for the fully-loaded core from approximately 340 to 740 K have also been evaluated. These experiments were performed as part of the power-up tests (References 1 and 2). Evaluation of the start-up core physics tests specific to the fully-loaded core (HTTR-GCR-RESR-001) and annular start-up core loadings (HTTR-GCR-RESR-002) have been previously evaluated.
Date: March 1, 2011
Creator: Bess, John D.; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Sterbentz, James W.; Snoj, Luka & Zukeran, Atsushi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A framework and methodology for nuclear fuel cycle transparency.

Description: A key objective to the global deployment of nuclear technology is maintaining transparency among nation-states and international communities. By providing an environment in which to exchange scientific and technological information regarding nuclear technology, the safe and legitimate use of nuclear material and technology can be assured. Many nations are considering closed or multiple-application nuclear fuel cycles and are subsequently developing advanced reactors in an effort to obtain some degree of energy self-sufficiency. Proliferation resistance features that prevent theft or diversion of nuclear material and reduce the likelihood of diversion from the civilian nuclear power fuel cycle are critical for a global nuclear future. IAEA Safeguards have been effective in minimizing opportunities for diversion; however, recent changes in the global political climate suggest implementation of additional technology and methods to ensure the prompt detection of proliferation. For a variety of reasons, nuclear facilities are becoming increasingly automated and will require minimum manual operation. This trend provides an opportunity to utilize the abundance of process information for monitoring proliferation risk, especially in future facilities. A framework that monitors process information continuously can lead to greater transparency of nuclear fuel cycle activities and can demonstrate the ability to resist proliferation associated with these activities. Additionally, a framework designed to monitor processes will ensure the legitimate use of nuclear material. This report describes recent efforts to develop a methodology capable of assessing proliferation risk in support of overall plant transparency. The framework may be tested at the candidate site located in Japan: the Fuel Handling Training Model designed for the Monju Fast Reactor at the International Cooperation and Development Training Center of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency.
Date: February 1, 2006
Creator: McClellan, Yvonne; York, David L.; Inoue, Naoko (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Love, Tracia L. & Rochau, Gary Eugene
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Incorporation of a risk analysis approach for the nuclear fuel cycle advanced transparency framework.

Description: Proliferation resistance features that reduce the likelihood of diversion of nuclear materials from the civilian nuclear power fuel cycle are critical for a global nuclear future. A framework that monitors process information continuously can demonstrate the ability to resist proliferation by measuring and reducing diversion risk, thus ensuring the legitimate use of the nuclear fuel cycle. The automation of new nuclear facilities requiring minimal manual operation makes this possible by generating instantaneous system state data that can be used to track and measure the status of the process and material at any given time. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) are working in cooperation to develop an advanced transparency framework capable of assessing diversion risk in support of overall plant transparency. The ''diversion risk'' quantifies the probability and consequence of a host nation diverting nuclear materials from a civilian fuel cycle facility. This document introduces the details of the diversion risk quantification approach to be demonstrated in the fuel handling training model of the MONJU Fast Reactor.
Date: May 1, 2007
Creator: Mendez, Carmen Margarita (Sociotecnia Solutions, LLC); York, David L.; Inoue, Naoko (Japan Atomic Energy Agency); Kitabata, Takuya (Japan Atomic Energy Agency); Vugrin, Eric D.; Vugrin, Kay White et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pre- and post-irradiation characterization and properties measurements of ZrC coated surrogate TRISO particles

Description: Zirconium carbide is a candidate to either replace or supplement silicon carbide as a coating material in TRISO fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels. Six sets of ZrC coated surrogate microsphere samples, fabricated by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency using the fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition method, were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These developmental samples available for the irradiation experiment were in conditions of either as-fabricated coated particles or particles that had been heat-treated to simulate the fuel compacting process. Five sets of samples were composed of nominally stoichiometric compositions, with the sixth being richer in carbon (C/Zr = 1.4). The samples were irradiated at 800 and 1250 C with fast neutron fluences of 2 and 6 dpa. Post-irradiation, the samples were retrieved from the irradiation capsules followed by microstructural examination performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis Laboratory. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Advanced Gas Reactor program as part of International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative collaboration with Japan. This report includes progress from that INERI collaboration, as well as results of some follow-up examination of the irradiated specimens. Post-irradiation examination items included microstructural characterization, and nanoindentation hardness/modulus measurements. The examinations revealed grain size enhancement and softening as the primary effects of both heat-treatment and irradiation in stoichiometric ZrC with a non-layered, homogeneous grain structure, raising serious concerns on the mechanical suitability of these particular developmental coatings as a replacement for SiC in TRISO fuel. Samples with either free carbon or carbon-rich layers dispersed in the ZrC coatings experienced negligible grain size enhancement during both heat treatment and irradiation. However, these samples experienced irradiation induced softening similar to stoichiometric ZrC samples.
Date: September 1, 2010
Creator: Vasudevamurthy, Gokul; Katoh, Yutai; Hunn, John D & Snead, Lance Lewis
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of the Start-Up Core Physics Tests at Japan's High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (Annular Core Loadings)

Description: The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor that was constructed with the objectives to establish and upgrade the technological basis for advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) as well as to conduct various irradiation tests for innovative high-temperature research. The core size of the HTTR represents about one-half of that of future HTGRs, and the high excess reactivity of the HTTR, necessary for compensation of temperature, xenon, and burnup effects during power operations, is similar to that of future HTGRs. During the start-up core physics tests of the HTTR, various annular cores were formed to provide experimental data for verification of design codes for future HTGRs. The Japanese government approved construction of the HTTR in the 1989 fiscal year budget; construction began at the Oarai Research and Development Center in March 1991 and was completed May 1996. Fuel loading began July 1, 1998, from the core periphery. The first criticality was attained with an annular core on November 10, 1998 at 14:18, followed by a series of start-up core physics tests until a fully-loaded core was developed on December 16, 1998. Criticality tests were carried out into January 1999. The first full power operation with an average core outlet temperature of 850ºC was completed on December 7, 2001, and operational licensing of the HTTR was approved on March 6, 2002. The HTTR attained high temperature operation at 950 ºC in April 19, 2004. After a series of safety demonstration tests, it will be used as the heat source in a hydrogen production system by 2015. Hot zero-power critical, rise-to-power, irradiation, and safety demonstration testing , have also been performed with the HTTR, representing additional means for computational validation efforts. Power tests were performed in steps from 0 ...
Date: March 1, 2010
Creator: Bess, John D.; Fujimoto, Nozomu; Sterbentz, James W.; Snoj, Luka & Zukeran, Atsushi
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department