14 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Final Technical Report: Microbial Production of Isoprene

Description: OAK B135 We have discovered that bacteria produce and emit the hydrocarbon isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene), and have suggested that if isoprene-producing enzymes and their genes can be harnessed, useful hydrocarbon-producing systems might be constructed. The main goal of the proposed work was to establish the biochemical mechanism and regulation of isoprene formation in the model bacterial system, Bacillus subtilis. In this 3-year project we (a) characterized the physiological regulation of isoprene formation in B. subtilis and its relationship to isoprene formation in plant chloroplasts; (b) analyzed genetic controls on isoprene formation in B. subtilis; and (c) developed models to explain the biochemical rationale for isoprene formation. We are also pursued (d) new methods for continuous measurement of isoprene release in bioreactors, and (e) determined the presence of isoprene-forming Bacillus on plant roots and used B. subtilis as a biocontrol agent for protection of plant roots from plant pathogenic bacteria. We have made significant advances in several areas. These include: (1) establishing the enzymatic basis of isoprene formation in B. subtilis, and demonstrating throughout growth in a bioreactor that isoprene synthase activity rises and falls with each of three peaks of isoprene release (i.e. it appears to be a regulated enzyme). (2) We have explored genetic aspects of isoprene formation, using gene disruption methods to greatly alter the patterns of isoprene formation in bioreactors. Analysis of these mutants and alteration of cellular levels of dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), the substrate for isoprene synthase, has led to the formulation of two models to explain why isoprene is formed: an isoprenoid overflow model and a signaling model. We have obtained compelling evidence that isoprene releases in bioreactors result from metabolic overflow. However, we have yet to determine the pattern of isoprene formation when these bacteria are grown in a more natural state (e.g. as biofilms ...
Date: September 12, 2003
Creator: Fall, Ray
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Microbial Production of Isoprene

Description: Isoprene is a volatile hydrocarbon of unknown function, produced by certain bacteria, plants and animals, sometimes in huge amounts—the Earth’s forests are estimated to emit >500 x 106 tons of isoprene per year. With funding from this program we explored the biochemistry and regulation of isoprene formation in the model bacterial system, Bacillus subtilis, with the goals of explaining the biological rationale for isoprene biogenesis and constructing an isoprene-overproducing microbial system. Although the role for isoprene formation in B. subtilis is still uncertain, our current model for regulation of this hydrocarbon’s synthesis is that isoprene production in B. subtilis is controlled by a combination of i) rapid regulation of isoprene synthase activity and ii) supply of the substrate for isoprene synthase, dimethyallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). This model parallels our current thinking about the control of isoprene formation in plant chloroplasts. In this reporting period we have been working to test part ii) of this model; this work has produced new results using genetic and analytical approaches. For examples, we have developed an analytical method to resolve DMAPP and its isomer, isopentenyl diphosphate, from each other in bacteria and plants. We have also shown that the IPP isomerase (type 2) of B. subtilis is not the source of “isoprene synthase” activity, and discovered that B. subtilis releases C5 isoprenoid alcohols to the medium, suggesting that isoprene plus other C5 isoprenoids may be common by-products of metabolism. In addition, we have continued to work on our discovery that wild type B. subtilis strains form prolific biofilms, are normal components of plant root microflora, and are testing the idea that B. subtilis growing in biofilms uses isoprene to induce plant root exudation.
Date: July 29, 2007
Creator: Fall, Ray
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling of dry deposition over regional scales with use of satellite data.

Description: Dry deposition, an essential component in the atmospheric budget of many trace chemicals, can deliver a major portion of the chemicals deposited at sensitive receptors at the surface of the Earth. Dry deposition in atmospheric numerical models is often described with modules that provide estimates of the deposition velocity V{sub d}, which is the downward flux divided by concentration at a specified height. A fairly common practice in dry deposition modules is to describe surface conditions that affect dry deposition in terms of broad land use and seasonal categories. This practice can lead to unrealistic values for V{sub d}, however, when vegetative conditions for one land use category vary considerably within the domain, when abrupt changes in surface conditions are imposed by a change in seasonal category, or when environmental conditions change vegetative properties within one season. To improve this situation, surface spectral reflectance sensed by environmental satellites can be used to provide more realistic depictions of the spatial and temporal variations in surface conditions. Such an approach is explored here, by extending of methods described by Gao (1995) and Gao and Wesely (1995), in conjunction with a previously developed dry deposition module (Wesely, 1989). In addition, because simulations of biogenic emissions usually rely on an adequate description of many of the surface conditions that affect dry deposition, we examine a method of using a single source of satellite data with modules for both biogenic emission rates and dry deposition velocities. The Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (BEIS) version 2.2, which is a version similar to the model described by Geron et al. (1994), is used. Results are presented for ozone V{sub d}, isoprene emission rates, and emission rates of other monoterpenes in the eastern half of the US and nearby areas for selected periods during 1989.
Date: October 12, 1998
Creator: Xu, Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Special Issue for the 9th International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere

Description: Carbonaceous particles are a minor constituent of the atmosphere but have a profound effect on air quality, human health, visibility and climate. The importance of carbonaceous particles has been increasingly recognized and become a mainstream topic at numerous conferences. Such was not the case in 1978, when the 1st International Conference on Carbonaceous Particles in the Atmosphere (ICCPA), or ''Carbon Conference'' as it is widely known, was introduced as a new forum to bring together scientists who were just beginning to reveal the importance and complexity of carbonaceous particles in the environment. Table 1 lists the conference dates, venues in the series as well as the proceedings, and special issues resulting form the meetings. Penner and Novakov (Penner and Novakov, 1996) provide an excellent historical perspective to the early ICCPA Conferences. Thirty years later, the ninth in this conference series was held at its inception site, Berkeley, California, attended by 160 scientists from 31 countries, and featuring both new and old themes in 49 oral and 83 poster presentations. Topics covered such areas as historical trends in black carbon aerosol, ambient concentrations, analytic techniques, secondary aerosol formation, biogenic, biomass, and HULIS1 characterization, optical properties, and regional and global climate effects. The conference website, http://iccpa.lbl.gov/, holds the agenda, as well as many presentations, for the 9th ICCPA. The 10th ICCPA is tentatively scheduled for 2011 in Vienna, Austria. The papers in this issue are representative of several of the themes discussed in the conference. Ban-Weiss et al., (Ban-Weiss et al., accepted) measured the abundance of ultrafine particles in a traffic tunnel and found that heavy duty diesel trucks emit at least an order of magnitude more ultrafine particles than light duty gas-powered vehicles per unit of fuel burned. Understanding of this issue is important as ultrafine particles have been shown to ...
Date: December 11, 2009
Creator: Strawa, A.W.; Kirchstetter, T.W. & Puxbaum, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A measurement technique for hydroxyacetone

Description: Hydroxyacetone (HA) is mainly produced in the atmosphere from oxidation of hydrocarbons of the type, CH{sub 3}(R)C{double{underscore}bond}CH{sub 2}. Tuazon and Atkinson (1990) reported HA yield of 41% from the OH-initiated oxidation of methacrolein in the presence of NOx. Since methacrolein is a major product of isoprene oxidation (Carter and Atkinson, 1996), isoprene, a key biogenic hydrocarbon, is therefore expected to be an important source for HA. Consequently, knowledge of ambient concentration of HA would provide information needed to examine the applicability of isoprene reaction mechanisms developed in laboratory and to assess the contribution of isoprene to photooxidant production. The commonly used GC-FID technique involving cryo-focusing is unsuitable for HA owing to HA's thermal instability. When subjected to a temperature of 100 C for only a few seconds, HA was found to disappear completely. Since HA is highly soluble in water, the authors developed a wet chemical technique similar in principle to the one they reported earlier, namely, derivatization following liquid scrubbing. To increase the sensitivity, they adopted a fluorescence detection scheme based on o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) chemistry. The technique was deployed in the field during two measurement periods at a NARSTO site located on Long Island, New York. The authors report the principle and the operation of this technique and the results obtained from these field studies.
Date: October 4, 1999
Creator: Klotz, P.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUE FOR HYDROXYACETONE.

Description: Hydroxyacetone (HA) is mainly produced in the atmosphere from oxidation of hydrocarbons of the type, CH{sub 3}(R)C=CH{sub 2}. Tuazon and Atkinson (1990) reported HA yield of 41% from the OH-initiated oxidation of methacrolein in the presence of NO{sub x}. Since methacrolein is a major product of isoprene oxidation (Carter and Atkinson, 1996), isoprene, a key biogenic hydrocarbon, is therefore expected to be an important source for HA. Consequently, knowledge of ambient concentration of HA would provide information needed to examine the applicability of isoprene reaction mechanisms developed in laboratory and to assess the contribution of isoprene to photooxidant production. The commonly used GC-FID technique involving cryo-focusing is unsuitable for HA owing to HA's thermal instability. When subjected to a temperature of 100 C for only a few seconds, HA was found to disappear completely. Since HA is highly soluble in water (it's Henry's law constant being {approx}2 x 10{sup 4} M atm{sup -1} at 20 C, Zhou and Lee, unpublished data), we developed a wet chemical technique similar in principle to the one we reported earlier (Lee and Zhou, 1993), namely, based on derivatization following liquid scrubbing. To increase the sensitivity, we adopted a fluorescence detection scheme based on o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA) chemistry. The technique was deployed in the field during two measurement periods at a NARSTO site located on Long Island (LI), New York. We report the principle and the operation of this technique and the results obtained from these field studies.
Date: October 4, 1999
Creator: KLOTZ,P.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparing modeled isoprene with aircraft-based measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer.

Description: Nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) are involved in a complex series of reactions that regulate the levels of oxidants in the troposphere. Isoprene (C{sub 5}H{sub 8}), the primary NMHC emitted from deciduous trees, is one of the most important reactive hydrocarbons in the troposphere. The amount of isoprene entering the free troposphere is regulated by the compound's rate of emission from leaves and by chemical and physical processes in the forest canopy and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This study uses a coupled canopy-ABL model to simulate these complex processes and compares calculated isoprene concentration profiles with those measured during aircraft flights above a forested region in the northeastern US. Land use information is coupled with satellite remote sensing data to describe spatial changes in canopy density during the field measurements. The high-resolution transport-chemistry model of Gao et al. (1993) for the ABL and the forest canopy layer is used to simulate vertical changes in isoprene concentration due to turbulent mixing and chemical reactions. The one-dimensional (1-D) ABL model includes detailed radiation transfer, turbulent diffusion, biogenic emissions, dry deposition, and chemical processes within the forest canopy and the ABL. The measured profiles are compared with the model simulations to investigate the biological, physical, and chemical processes that regulate the levels of isoprene within the ABL.
Date: December 12, 1997
Creator: Doskey, P. & Gao, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress Report: DE-FG03-97ER20274, ''Microbial Production of Isoprene''

Description: We have discovered that microorganisms produce and emit the hydrocarbon isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene), and have suggested that if isoprene-producing enzymes and their genes can be harnessed, useful hydrocarbon-producing systems might be constructed. The main goal of the proposed work is to establish the biochemical mechanism and regulation of isoprene formation in the bacterial system, Bacillus subtilis. Specific objectives of the proposed work are the following: (A) to characterize the physiological regulation of isoprene formation in B. subtilis; (B) to characterize mutations in B. subtilis 168 that suppress isoprene formation, clone these genes, and determine how isoprene and isoprenoid carbon flow are regulated; and (C) to test ''overflow'' and ''signaling'' models for Bacillus isoprene formation. We are also pursuing the isolation and cloning of B. subtilis isoprene synthase, which we believe may be a regulatory enzyme.
Date: March 13, 2002
Creator: Fall, Ray
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sorption of organic gases in a furnished room

Description: We present experimental data and semi-empirical models describing the sorption of organic gases in a simulated indoor residential environment. Two replicate experiments were conducted with 20 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a 50-m{sup 3} room finished with painted wallboard, carpet and cushion, draperies and furnishings. The VOCs span a wide volatility range and include ten Hazardous Air Pollutants. VOCs were introduced to the static chamber as a pulse and their gas-phase concentrations were measured during a net adsorption period and a subsequent net desorption period. Three sorption models were fit to the measured concentrations for each compound to determine the simplest formulation needed to adequately describe the observed behavior. Sorption parameter values were determined by fitting the models to adsorption period data then checked by comparing measured and predicted behavior during desorption. The adequacy of each model was evaluated using a goodness of fit parameter calculated for each period. Results indicate that sorption usually does not greatly affect indoor concentrations of methyl-tert-butyl ether, 2-butanone, isoprene and benzene. In contrast, sorption appears to be a relevant indoor process for many of the VOCs studied, including C{sub 8}-C{sub 10} aromatic hydrocarbons (HC), terpenes, and pyridine. These compounds sorbed at rates close to typical residential air change rates and exhibited substantial sorptive partitioning at equilibrium. Polycyclic aromatic HCs, aromatic alcohols, ethenylpyridine and nicotine initially adsorbed to surfaces at rates of 1.5 to >6 h{sup -1} and partitioned 95 to >99% in the sorbed phase at equilibrium.
Date: November 30, 2003
Creator: Singer, Brett C.; Revzan, Kenneth L.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Hodgson, Alfred T. & Brown, Nancy J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Novel modified zeolites for energy-efficient hydrocarbon separations.

Description: We present synthesis, characterization and testing results of our applied research project, which focuses on the effects of surface and skeletal modification of zeolites for significant enhancements in current hydrocarbon (HC) separations. Zeolites are commonly used by the chemical and petroleum industries as catalysts and ion-exchangers. They have high potential for separations owing to their unique pore structures and adsorption properties and their thermal, mechanical and chemical properties. Because of zeolites separation properties, low cost, and robustness in industrial process, they are natural choice for use as industrial adsorbents. This is a multidisciplinary effort to research, design, develop, engineer, and test new and improved materials for the separation of branched vs. linear organic molecules found in commercially important HC streams via adsorption based separations. The focus of this project was the surface and framework modification of the commercially available zeolites, while tuning the adsorption properties and the selectivities of the bulk and membrane separations. In particular, we are interested with our partners at Goodyear Chemical, on how to apply the modified zeolites to feedstock isoprene purification. For the characterization and the property measurements of the new and improved materials powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Residual Gas Analyzer-Mass Spectroscopy (RGA-MS), Electron Microscopy (SEM/EDAX), temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and surface area techniques were utilized. In-situ carbonization of MFI zeolite membranes allowed for the maximum separation of isoprene from n-pentane, with a 4.1% enrichment of the binary stream with n-pentane. In four component streams, a modified MFI membrane had high selectivities for n-pentane and 1-3-pentadiene over isoprene but virtually no separation for the 2-methyl-2-butene/isoprene pair.
Date: November 1, 2006
Creator: Arruebo, Manuel (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO); Dong, Junhang; Anderson, Thomas (Burns and McDonnell, Kansas City, MO); Gu, Xuehong; Gray, Gary (Goodyear Chemical Company, Akron, OH); Bennett, Ron (Goodyear Chemical Company, Akron, OH) et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Cloud Condensation Nuclei in Cumulus Humilis — selected Case Study During the CHAPS Campaign

Description: The Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study (CHAPS) provided a unique opportunity to study aerosol and cloud processing. Clouds play an active role in the processing and cycling of atmospheric constituents. Gases and particles can partition to cloud droplets by absorption and condensation as well as activation and impact scavenging. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft was used as one of the main platforms in CHAPS. Flight tracks were designed and implemented to characterize freshly emitted aerosols at cloud top and cloud base as well as within the cloud, i.e., cumulus humilis (or fair-weather cumulus), in the vicinity of Oklahoma City. Measurements of interstitial aerosols and residuals of activated condensation cloud nuclei were conducted simultaneously. The interstitial aerosols were measured downstream of an isokinetic inlet, and the activated particles downstream of a counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI). The sampling line to the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was switched between the isokinetic inlet and the CVI to allow characterization of non-activated interstitial particles outside of clouds in contrast to particles activated in clouds. Trace gases including ozone, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, and a series of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were also measured, as were key meteorological state parameters including liquid water content, cloud drop size, and dew point. We will report on the CCN properties in cumulus humilis. Several approaches will be taken. The first is single-particle analysis of particles collected by the Time-Resolved Aerosol Sampler (TRAC) by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coupled with energy disperse X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Specifically, we examine differences between activated and interstitial ones, such as differences in chemical composition and morphology. The second analysis will link in situ measurements by AMS and PTRMS with the observations by TRAC. For instance, by comparing the characteristic m/z obtained by AMS and the ...
Date: March 15, 2010
Creator: Yu, X.; Lee, Y.; Berg, L.; Berkowitz, C.; Alexander, L.; Laskin, A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rubber elasticity. June 15, 1981-June 14, 1981. [Polydimethylsiloxane]

Description: Progress on the following three projects are described: swelling of elastomers by diluents; theoretical analysis of the dynamics and thermodynamics of random networks; and synthesis of elastomers with metal-chelate crosslinkages. Five elastomer-solvent systems were investigated. In all cases polydimethylsiloxane was used with either cyclohexane or benzene or both. The comparison established the general validity of Flory's new constrained junction theory. However a slight revision of the theory was required. Theoretical work on amorphorus systems centered on evaluation of the density states for models (constructed by others) of amorphorus silicon, As/sub 2/O/sub 3/, etc. The utility of these models are being assessed. A batch of styrene-isoprene elastomer was prepared and is undergoing stress-strain measurements.
Date: January 1, 1981
Creator: Eichinger, B.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of isoprene in mice and rats: Final report

Description: Isoprene, a reactive, branched diene, is used in large quantities in the manufacture of polyisoprene and as a copolymer in the synthesis of butyl rubber. The potential for isoprene to cause developmental toxicity was assessed in rodents, by exposing four groups each of Sprague-Dawley rats and Swiss (CD-1) mice to 0, 280, 1400, or 7000 ppM isoprene vapors, 6 h/day, 7 day/wk. Each treatment group consisted of 10 virgin females (for comparison), and approx.30 positively mated rats or mice. Positively mated mice were exposed on days 6-17 of gestation (dg), and rats on 6-19 dg. The day of plug or sperm detection was designated as 0 dg. Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice (rats, 20 dg; mice, 18 dg). Implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. 31 refs., 6 figs., 19 tabs.
Date: January 1, 1989
Creator: Mast, T.J.; Evanoff, J.J.; Stoney, K.H.; Westerberg, R.B.; Rommereim, R.L. & Weigel, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department