85 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Interlaboratory Comparisons of NbTi Critical Current Measurements

Description: We report on a multi-institute comparison of critical current data measured on a modern NbTi wire for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which has shown a standard deviation below 1% in critical current density spread in more than 1500 measurements. Interlaboratory comparisons on Nb{sub 3}Sn wires have shown ambiguities that could be attributable to strain related differences in critical current density, originating from differences in sample handling, reaction, and mounting techniques, or also to differences in the magnetic field and current calibrations between the institutes. A round robin test of a well characterized NbTi wire provides a baseline variance in critical current results that is presumed to be attributable only to differences in the characterization systems. Systematic differences on the order of 3.5% are found in the comparison. The most likely cause for the observed differences is a small diameter holder that brings the wire into a strain regime in which strain effects can no longer be ignored. A NbTi round robin test, when performed properly, will separate system differences from sample specific differences and provide laboratories with an opportunity to calibrate equipment against a standard measurement.
Date: August 16, 2009
Creator: Godeke, A.; Turrioni, D.; Boutboul, T.; Cheggour, N.; Goodrich, L.F.; Ghosh, A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Confirmatory Survey Results for the Reactor Building Dome Upper Surfaces, Rancho Saco Nuclear Generating Station

Description: Results from a confirmatory survey of the upper structural surfaces of the Reactor Building Dome at the Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station (RSNGS) performed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education for the NRC. Also includes results of interlaboratory comparison analyses on several archived soil samples that would be provided by RSNGS personnel. The confirmatory surveys were performed on June 7 and 8, 2006.
Date: October 25, 2006
Creator: Adams, Wade C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NCSL National Measurement Interlaboratory Comparison Database requirements

Description: With the recent development of an International Comparisons Database which provides worldwide access to measurement comparison data between National Measurement Institutes, there is currently renewed interest in developing a database of comparisons for calibration laboratories within a country. For many years, the National Conference of Standards Laboratories (NCSL), through the Measurement Comparison Programs Committee, has sponsored Interlaboratory Comparisons in a variety of measurement areas. This paper will discuss the need for such a National database which catalogues and maintains Interlaboratory Comparisons data. The paper will also discuss future requirements in this area.
Date: April 20, 2000
Creator: WHEELER,JAMES C. & PETTIT,RICHARD B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Status report and FY95 plans -- Re-evaluation of NOAA Dobson spectrophotometer total ozone data. 1994 annual report

Description: The goal of this project was to re-evaluate NOAA/CMDL Dobson spectrophotometer total ozone data during FY94 from the stations Haute Provence, France; Lauder, New Zealand; Perth, Australia; and Poker Flat, Alaska and the Umkehr data from Boulder, Colorado and Mauna Loa, Hawaii. During the second year the authors planned to re-evaluate total ozone data from Byrd, Hallett and South Pole, Antarctica; Fairbanks, Alaska; Puerto Montt, Chile; Huancayo, Peru and Umkehr data from Huancayo.
Date: December 31, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BY BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY DURING THE WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION INTERCOMPARISON STUDY, MAY-JUNE 2000.

Description: The WHOI buoy radiometer intercomparison took place during May and June, 2000 at the WHOI facility. The WHOI IMET, JAMSTEC Triton, and NOAA TAO buoy systems were operated from a beach site and the Brookhaven National Laboratory set up two Portable Radiation Package systems (P01 and P02) alongside the WHOI instrumentation on the roof of the Clark Building, about 300 m away. The BNL instruments were named ''P01'' and ''P02'' and were identical. Buoy instruments were all leveled to {+-}1{degree} to horizontal. The purpose of the project was to compare the buoy systems with precision measurements so that any differences in data collection or processing would be evaluated. BNL was pleased to participate so the PRP system could be evaluated as a calibration tool. The Portable Radiation Package is an integral component of the BNL Shipboard Oceanographic and Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR) system. It is designed to make accurate downwelling radiation measurements, including the three solar irradiance components (direct normal, diffuse and global) at six narrowband channels, aerosol optical depth measurements, and broadband longwave and shortwave irradiance measurements.
Date: December 1, 2000
Creator: Reynolds, R. M.; Bartholomew, M. J.; Miller, M. A.; Smith, S. & Edwards, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Internet-Based Calibration of a Multifunction Calibrator

Description: A new way of providing calibration services is evolving which employs the Internet to expand present capabilities and make the calibration process more interactive. Sandia National Laboratories and the National Institute of Standards and Technology are collaborating to set up and demonstrate a remote calibration of multijunction calibrators using this Internet-based technique that is becoming known as e-calibration. This paper describes the measurement philosophy and the Internet resources that can provide real-time audio/video/data exchange, consultation and training, as well as web-accessible test procedures, software and calibration reports. The communication system utilizes commercial hardware and software that should be easy to integrate into most calibration laboratories.
Date: December 19, 2000
Creator: BUNTING BACA,LISA A.; DUDA JR.,LEONARD E.; WALKER,RUSSELL M.; OLDHAM,NILE & PARKER,MARK
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Comparison of 1 T(Omega) and 10 T (Omega) High Resistance Standards Between NIST and Sandia

Description: NIST-built 10 T{Omega} and commercial 1 T{Omega} standard resistors were hand carried between NIST and Sandia for a high resistance comparison. The comparison tested the ruggedness of the new NIST-built standard resistors, provided a check of the scaling between the two laboratories, supported measurements to reestablish NIST calibration services at 10 T{Omega} and 100 T{Omega}, and demonstrated the possibility of establishing a NIST high resistance measurement assurance program (MAP). The comparison has demonstrated agreement on the order of 0.07% which is within the expanded uncertainties (coverage factor = 2) of NIST and Sandia at 1 T{Omega} and 10 T{Omega}.
Date: April 23, 1999
Creator: Jarrett, D.G.; Dziuba, R.F. & Kraft, M.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calorimetry exchange program. Quarterly data report, 1st quarter 1991

Description: The goals of the Calorimetry Sample Exchange Program are: (1) Discuss measurement differences, (2) Review and improve analytical measurements and methods, (3) Discuss new measurement capabilities, (4) Provide data to DOE on measurement capabilities to evaluate shipper-receiver differences, (5) Provide characterized or standard materials as necessary for exchange participants, (6) Provide a measurement control program for plutonium analysis. A sample of PuO{sub 2} powder is available at each participating site for NDA measurement, including either or both calorimetry and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, the elements which are typically combined to provide a calorimetric assay of plutonium. The facilities measure the sample as frequently and to the level of precision which they desire, and then submit the data to the Exchange for analysis. Statistical tests are used to evaluate the data and to determine if there are significant differences from accepted values for the exchange sample or from data previously reported by that facility. This information is presented, in the form of a quarterly report, intended for use by Exchange participants in measurement control programs, or to indicate when bias corrections-may be appropriate. No attempt, however, has been made to standardize methods or frequency of data collection, calibration, or operating procedures. Direct comparisons between laboratories may, therefore, be misleading since data have not been collected to the same precision or for the same time periods. A meeting of the participants of the Calorimetry Exchange is held annually at EG&G Mound Applied Technologies. The purposes of this meeting are to discuss measurement differences, problems, and new measurement capabilities, and to determine the additional activities needed to fulfill the goals of the Exchange.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: McClelland, T.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interlaboratory study of the reproducibility of the single-pass flow-through test method : measuring the dissolution rate of LRM glass at 70 {sup {degree}}C and pH 10.

Description: An international interlaboratory study (ILS) was conducted to evaluate the precision with which single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests can be conducted by following a method to be standardized by the American Society for Testing and Materials - International. Tests for the ILS were conducted with the low-activity reference material (LRM) glass developed previously for use as a glass test standard. Tests were conducted at 70 {+-} 2 C using a LiCl/LiOH solution as the leachant to impose an initial pH of about 10 (at 70 C). Participants were provided with LRM glass that had been crushed and sieved to isolate the -100 +200 mesh size fraction, and then washed to remove fines. Participants were asked to conduct a series of tests using different solution flow rate-to-sample mass ratios to generate a range of steady-state Si concentrations. The glass dissolution rate under each test condition was calculated using the steady-state Si concentration and solution flow rate that were measured in the test. The glass surface area was estimated from the mass of glass used in the test and the Si content of LRM glass was known. A linear relationship between the rate and the steady-state Si concentration (at Si concentrations less than 10 mg/L) was used to estimate the forward dissolution rate, which is the rate in the absence of dissolved Si. Participants were asked to sample the effluent solution at least five times after reaction times of between 3 and 14 days to measure the Si concentration and flow rate, and to verify that steady-state was achieved. Results were provided by seven participants and the data sets provided by five participants were sufficient to determine the forward rates independently.
Date: February 28, 2006
Creator: Ebert, W. L. & Engineering, Chemical
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results from ORNL Characterization of Nominal 350 ?m LEUCO Kernels (LEU03) from the BWXT G73V-20-69303 Composite

Description: Measurements were made using optical microscopy to determine the size and shape of the LEU03 kernels. Hg porosimetry was performed to measure density. The results are summarized in Table 1-1. Values in the table are for the composite and are calculated at 95% confidence from the measured values of a random riffled sample. The LEu03 kernel composite met all the specifications in Table 1-1. The BWXT results for measuring the same kernel properties are given in Table 1-2. BWXT characterization methods were significantly different from ORNL methods, which resulted in slight differences in the reported results. BWXT performed manual microscopy measurements for mean diameter (100 particles measured along 2 axes) and aspect ratio (100 particles measured); ORNL used automated image acquisition and analysis (3847 particles measured along 180 axes). Diameter measurements were in good agreement. The narrower confidence interval in the ORNL results for average mean diameter is due to the greater number of particles measured. The critical limits for mean diameter reported at ORNL and BWXT are similar, because ORNL measured a larger standard deviation (10.46 {micro}m vs. 8.70 {micro}m). Aspect ratio satisfied the specification with greater margin in the ORNL results mostly because of the larger sample size resulting in a lower uncertainty in the binomial distribution statistical calculation. ORNL measured 11 out of 3847 kernels exceeding the control limit (1.05); BWXT measured 1 out of 100 particles exceeding the control limit. BWXT used the aspect ratio of perpendicular diameters in a random image plane, where one diameter was a maximum or a minimum. ORNL used the aspect ratio of the absolute maximum and minimum diameters in a random image plane. The ORNL technique can be expected to yield higher measured aspect ratios. Hand tabling was performed at ORNL prior to characterization by repeatedly pouring a small fraction ...
Date: November 1, 2006
Creator: Kercher, Andrew K. & Hunn, John D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calorimetry Exchange Program Quarterly Data Report, 4th Quarter CY91

Description: The goals of the Calorimetry Sample Exchange Program are: (1) Discuss measurement differences, (2) Review and improve analytical measurements and methods, (3) Discuss new measurement capabilities, (4) Provide data to DOE on measurement capabilities to evaluate shipper-receiver differences, (5) Provide characterized or standard materials as necessary for exchange participants, (6) Provide a measurement control program for plutonium analysis. A sample of PuO{sub 2} powder is available at each participating site for NDA measurement, including either or both calorimetry and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, the elements which are typically combined to provide a calorimetric assay of plutonium. The facilities measure the sample as frequently and to the level of precision which they desire, and then submit the data to the Exchange for analysis. Statistical tests are used to evaluate the data and to determine if there are significant differences from accepted values for the exchange sample or from data previously reported by that facility. This information is presented, in the form of a quarterly report, intended for use by Exchange participants in measurement control programs, or to indicate when bias corrections may be appropriate. No attempt, however, has been made to standardize methods or frequency of data collection, calibration, or operating procedures. Direct comparisons between laboratories may, therefore, be misleading since data have not been collected to the same precision or for the same time periods. A meeting of the participants of the Calorimetry Exchange is held annually at EG&G Mound Applied Technologies. The purposes of this meeting are to discuss measurement differences, problems, and new measurement capabilities, and to determine the additional activities needed to fulfill the goals of the Exchange.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: McClelland, T.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Replication and efficiency in experiments for marketable emissions permits

Description: The Energy Information Administration (EIA) funded the universities of Colorado and Arizona to define an experimental institution that captures the salient features of the sulfur dioxide allowance market created by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA); to develop and document a transportable software that implements the experimental institutions; and to replicate experiments. Subsequently, EIA, in conjunction with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) funded the universities of Mississippi and Southern California to test the replicability of these experiments using statistically sound experimental design and the standardized software developed by the University of Arizona. The present experiment is designed to identify any differences in the results of the two laboratory sites. It is designed to determine whether market outcomes are reproducible across different laboratories and experimenters and to determine if any behavior patterns exist across a large set of independent experimental sessions.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Cason, T.N.; Elliott, S.R.; Kundra, I. & Van Boening, M.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

U.S. bioassay Intercomparison Studies Program at Oak Ridge National Lab

Description: The Intercomparison Studies Program (ISP) for in-vitro bioassay at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been in place since May 1991. The ISP was originally created to fill a need in the Radiobioassay area at ORNL, specifically in the areas of Quality Control, Quality Assurance, and Performance Testing. In the beginning, this consisted of two or three laboratories working in a pilot intercomparison program. Once it was determined that this could work effectively, the program began to seek additional members to broaden the scope of the effort. The program became formalized with a quarterly report in January 1992. The ISP currently provides cross-check blind/double-blind samples spiked with known amounts of radioactivity to various Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, universities, and private industry organizations throughout the US. These samples can be packaged according to ORNL procedures (ORNL sample bottles, ORNL chain-of-custody forms, tamper seals etc.), for a single blind sample or according to the needs of a particular facility if the double-blind sample mode is to be maintained. In 1998, the customer base was broadened to include European facilities. In January 1993, the whole-body count program was added. This involves each participating facility receiving a block phantom from the ISP and determining a geometry factor using a known standard. At quarterly intervals, each participant receives an unknown sample for analysis. The sample is counted and the data is collected for publication in an annual report. In October 1994, the fecal program was added. This involves spiking an artificial matrix with known amounts of radioactivity. Laboratories receive unknown samples on a quarterly basis. The sample is counted and the data is collected and published in a quarterly report. The ISP maintains archive samples which can be analyzed in the QC laboratory at the request of any participants if a conflict or discrepancy ...
Date: June 1, 1998
Creator: Payne, G.F.; Bores, N.; Melton, K.K. & Rankin, J.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calorimetry exchange program. Quarterly data report, 2nd quarter 1992

Description: The goals of the Calorimetry Sample Exchange Program are: (1) Discuss measurement differences, (2) Review and improve analytical measurements and methods, (3) Discuss new measurement capabilities, (4) Provide data to DOE on measurement capabilities to evaluate shipper-receiver differences, (5) Provide characterized or standard materials as necessary for exchange participants, (6) Provide a measurement control program for plutonium analysis. A sample of PuO{sub 2} powder is available at each participating site for NDA measurement, including either or both calorimetry and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, the elements which are typically combined to provide a calorimetric assay of plutonium. The facilities measure the sample as frequently and to the level of precision which they desire, and then submit the data to the Exchange for analysis. Statistical tests are used to evaluate the data and to determine if there are significant differences from accepted values for the exchange sample or from data previously reported by that facility. This information is presented, in the form of a quarterly report, intended for use by Exchange participants in measurement control programs, or to indicate when bias corrections may be appropriate. No, attempt, however, has been made to standardize methods or frequency of data collection, calibration, or operating procedures. Direct comparisons between laboratories may, therefore, be misleading since data have not been collected to the same precision or for the same time periods. A meeting of the participants of the Calorimetry Exchange is held annually at EG&G Mound Applied Technologies. The purposes of this meeting are to discuss measurement differences, problems, and new measurement capabilities, and to determine the additional activities needed to fulfill the goals of the Exchange.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Barnett, T.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The difference between teamwork and compliance: The application of game theory to real-world research teams

Description: This study explores the relationships between cooperation, teamwork, and game theory in actual multidisciplinary research teams. Two types of cooperation have been differentiated as ``compliance`` (cooperation, which is enforced by short-term interest) and ``teamwork`` (in which team members give up short-term gains for longer-term gains). ``Compliance`` is best explained by the Principal Agent Theory and is best applied to routine activities. ``Teamwork`` is best explained by a modification of Axelrod`s Theory of Cooperation and is best applied to problem-solving, non-routine activities. These exploratory findings have important implications for organizational structure considerations and management policies.
Date: April 1, 1994
Creator: Frank, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calorimetry Exchange Program, Annual Data Report, 1991

Description: The goals of the Calorimetry Sample Exchange Program are: (1) Discuss measurement differences, (2) Review and improve analytical measurements and methods, (3) Discuss new measurement capabilities, (4) Provide data to DOE on measurement capabilities to evaluate shipper-receiver differences, (5) Provide characterized or standard materials as necessary for exchange participants, (6) Provide a measurement control program for plutonium analysis. A sample of PuO{sub 2} powder is available at each participating site for NDA measurement, including either or both calorimetry and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, the elements which are typically combined to provide a calorimetric assay of plutonium. The facilities measure the sample as frequently and to the level of precision which they desire, and then submit the data to the Exchange for analysis. Statistical tests are used to evaluate the data and to determine if there are significant differences from accepted values for the exchange sample or from data previously reported by that facility. This information is presented, in the form of a quarterly report, intended for use by Exchange participants in measurement control programs, or to indicate when bias corrections may be appropriate. No attempt, however, has been made to standardize methods or frequency of data collection, calibration, or operating procedures. Direct comparisons between laboratories may, therefore, be misleading since data have not been collected to the same precision or for the same time periods. A meeting of the participants of the Calorimetry Exchange is held annually at EG&G Mound Applied Technologies. The purposes of this meeting are to discuss measurement differences, problems, and new measurement capabilities, and to determine the additional activities needed to fulfill the goals of the Exchange.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: McClelland, T.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Calorimetry exchange program. Quarterly data report, 1st quarter 1992

Description: The goals of the Calorimetry Sample Exchange Program are: (1) Discuss measurement differences, (2) Review and improve analytical measurements and methods, (3) Discuss new measurement capabilities, (4) Provide data to DOE on measurement capabilities to evaluate shipper-receiver differences, (5) Provide characterized or standard materials as necessary for exchange participants, (6) Provide a measurement control program for plutonium analysis. A sample of PuO{sub 2} powder is available at each participating site for NDA measurement, including either or both calorimetry and high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy, the elements which are typically combined to provide a calorimetric assay of plutonium. The facilities measure the sample as frequently and to the level of precision which they desire, and then submit the data to the Exchange for analysis. Statistical tests are used to evaluate the data and to determine if there are significant differences from accepted values for the exchange sample or from data previously reported by that facility. This information is presented, in the form of a quarterly report, intended for use by Exchange participants in measurement control programs, or to indicate when bias corrections may be appropriate. No attempt, however, has been made to standardize methods or frequency of data collection, calibration, or operating procedures. Direct comparisons between laboratories may, therefore, be misleading since data have not been collected to the same precision or for the same time periods. A meeting of the participants of the Calorimetry Exchange is held annually at EG&G Mound Applied Technologies. The purposes of this meeting are to discuss measurement differences, problems, and new measurement capabilities, and to determine the additional activities needed to fulfill the goals of the Exchange.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Barnett, T.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report of the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Quality Assessment Program, inorganic intercomparison study

Description: This report presents results from the soil inorganic analysis of the 44th set of environmental quality assessment samples, of the quality assessment program, that were received on or before June 3, 1996. The samples were analyzed for RCRA metals.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Greenlaw, P.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The April 1994 and October 1994 radon intercomparisons at EML

Description: Quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) are the backbone of many commercial and research processes and programs. QA/QC research tests the state of a functioning system, be it the production of manufactured goods or the ability to make accurate and precise measurements. The quality of the radon measurements in the US have been tested under controlled conditions in semi-annual radon gas intercomparison exercises sponsored by the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) since 1981. The two Calendar Year 1994 radon gas intercomparison exercises were conducted in the EML exposure chamber. Thirty-two groups including US Federal facilities, USDOE contractors, national and state laboratories, universities and foreign institutions participated in these exercises. The majority of the participant`s results were within {+-}10% of the EML value at radon concentrations of 570 and 945 Bq m{sup {minus}3}.
Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Fisenne, I.M.; George, A.C.; Perry, P.M. & Keller, H.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Steam generator mock-up for assessment of inservice inspection technology.

Description: A steam generator mock-up has been assembled for round-robin studies of the effectiveness of currently practiced inservice inspection (ISI) technology for detection of current-day flaws. The mock-up will also be used to evaluate emerging inspection technologies. The 3.66-m (12-ft.)-tall mock-up contains 400 tube openings, each consisting of 9 test sections that can be used to simulate current-day field-induced flaws and artifacts. Included in the mock-up are simulations of tube support plate (TSP) intersections and the tube sheet (TS). Cracks are present at the TSP, TS, and in the free span sections of the mock-up. For initial evaluation of the round-robin results, various eddy current methods, as well as multivariate models for data analysis techniques, are being used to estimate the depth and length of defects in the mock-up. To ensure that the round-robin is carried out with procedures as close as possible to those implemented in the field, input was obtained from industry experts on the protocol and procedures to be used for the exercise. One initial assembly of the mock-up with a limited number of flaws and artifact has been completed and tested. A second completed configuration with additional flaw and artifacts simulations will be used for the round-robin.
Date: September 11, 1999
Creator: Bakhtiari, S.; Kupperman, D. S. & Muscara, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Second interlaboratory comparison study for the analysis of 239Pu in synthetic urine at the microBq (-100 aCi) level by mass spectrometry

Description: As a follow up to the initial 1998 intercomparison study, a second study was initiated in 2001 as part of the ongoing evaluation of the capabilities of various ultra-sensitive methods to analyze {sup 239}Pu in urine samples. The initial study was sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of International Health Programs to evaluate and validate new technologies that may supersede the existing fission tract analysis (FTA) method for the analysis of {sup 239}Pu in urine at the {micro}Bq/l level. The ultra-sensitive techniques evaluated in the second study included accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) by LLNL, thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) by LANL and FTA by the University of Utah. Only the results for the mass spectrometric methods will be presented. For the second study, the testing levels were approximately 4, 9, 29 and 56 {micro}Bq of {sup 239}Pu per liter of synthetic urine. Each test sample also contained {sup 240}Pu at a {sup 240}Pu/{sup 239}Pu atom ratio of {approx}0.15 and natural uranium at a concentration of 50 {micro}Bq/ml. From the results of the two studies, it can be inferred that the best performance at the {micro}Bq level is more laboratory specific than method specific. The second study demonstrated that LANL-TIMS and LLNL-AMS had essentially the same quantification level for both isotopes. Study results for bias and precision and acceptable performance compared to ANSI N13.30 and ANSI N42.22 have been compiled.
Date: January 28, 2005
Creator: McCurdy, D; Lin, Z; Inn, K W; Bell III, R; Wagner, S; Efurd, D W et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department