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Hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial confinement fusion

Description: The focus of the paper is on buoyancy-driven instabilities of the Rayleigh-Taylor type, which are commonly regarded as the most important kind of hydrodynamic instability in inertial-confinement-fusion implosions. The paper is intended to be pedagogical rather than research-oriented, and so is by no means a comprehensive review of work in this field. Rather, it is hoped that the student will find here a foundation on which to build an understanding of current research, and the experienced researcher will find a compilation of useful results. The aim of the paper is to discuss the evolution of a single Rayleigh-Taylor-unstable mode, from its linear phase to its late-stage constant-velocity bubble growth, with a brief consideration of the saturation of linear growth. The influence of other modes in invoked only in the short-range sense (in wavenumber space) of the Haan saturation model. Owing to limitations of space, the treatment of other instabilities such as Richtmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz is necessarily very brief, and entirely inadequate as an introductory discussion. Likewise, there is no reference to the effect of convergent geometry, to long-range mode coupling, or to shape effects in three-dimensional growth. Furthermore, there is no reference to the large body of experimental research related to hydrodynamic instabilities.
Date: December 1, 1994
Creator: Hoffman, N. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mercury: The Los Alamos ICF KrF laser system

Description: The Mercury KrF laser facility at Los Alamos is being built with the benefit of lessons learned from the Aurora system. An increased understanding of KrF laser engineering, and the designed implementation of system flexibility, will permit Mercury to serve as a tested for a variety of advanced KrF technology concepts.
Date: January 19, 1993
Creator: Czuchlewski, S. J.; York, G. W.; Bigio, I. J.; Brucker, J.; Hanson, D.; Honig, E. M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Inference of ICF Implosion Core Mix using Experimental Data and Theoretical Mix Modeling

Description: The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosion cores is a current topic of interest. The goal of this work was to design direct-drive ICF experiments which have varying levels of mix, and subsequently to extract information on mixing directly from the experimental data using spectroscopic techniques. The experimental design was accomplished using hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with Haan's saturation model, which was used to predict the mix levels of candidate experimental configurations. These theoretical predictions were then compared to the mixing information which was extracted from the experimental data, and it was found that Haan's mix model performed well in predicting trends in the width of the mix layer. With these results, we have contributed to an assessment of the range of validity and predictive capability of the Haan saturation model, as well as increased our confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from experimental data.
Date: April 30, 2008
Creator: Welser-Sherrill, L; Haynes, D A; Mancini, R C; Cooley, J H; Tommasini, R; Golovkin, I E et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Response to Questions on Presentation to NAS

Description: Response to questions on the presentation 'Overview to Chamber and Power Plant Designs for IFE' made at the 1/29-31 meeting of the National Academies Committee on the Prospects for Inertial Confinement Fusion Energy Systems.
Date: March 17, 2011
Creator: Meier, W. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Inference of ICF implosion core mix using experimental data and theoretical mix modeling

Description: The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (lCF) implosion cores is a current topic of interest. The goal of this work was to design direct-drive ICF experiments which have varying levels of mix, and subsequently to extract information on mixing directly from the experimental data using spectroscopic techniques. The experimental design was accomplished using hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with Haan's saturation model, which was used to predict the mix levels of candidate experimental configurations. These theoretical predictions were then compared to the mixing information which was extracted from the experimental data, and it was found that Haan's mix model predicted trends in the width of the mix layer as a function of initial shell thickness. These results contribute to an assessment of the range of validity and predictive capability of the Haan saturation model, as well as increasing confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from experimental data.
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Sherrill, Leslie Welser; Haynes, Donald A; Cooley, James H; Sherrill, Manolo E; Mancini, Roberto C; Tommasini, Riccardo et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nonuniformity for rotated beam illumination in directly driven heavy-ion fusion

Description: A key issue in heavy-ion beam inertial confinement fusion is target interaction, especially implosion symmetry. In this paper the 2D beam irradiation nonuniformity on the surface of a spherical target is studied. This is a first step to studies of 3D dynamical effects on target implosion. So far non-rotated beams have been studied. Because normal incidence may increase Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, it has been suggested to rotate beams (to increase average uniformity) and hit the target tangentially. The level of beam irradiation uniformity, beam spill and normal incidence is calculated in this paper. In Mathematica the rotated beams are modeled as an annular integrated Gaussian beam. To simplify the chamber geometry, the illumination scheme is not a 4{pi} system, but the beams are arranged on few polar rings around the target. The position of the beam spot rings is efficiently optimized using the analytical model. The number of rings and beams, rotation radii and widths are studied to optimize uniformity and spilled intensity. The results demonstrate that for a 60-beam system on four rings Peak-To-Valley nonuniformities of under 0.5% are possible.
Date: January 2, 2009
Creator: Runge, J. & Logan, B.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solid Deuterium-Tritium Surface Roughness In A Beryllium Inertial Confinement Fusion Shell

Description: Solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel layers for inertial confinement fusion experiments were formed inside of a 2 mm diameter beryllium shell and were characterized using phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging. The solid D-T surface roughness is found to be 0.4 {micro}m for modes 7-128 at 1.5 K below the melting temperature. The layer roughness is found to increase with decreasing temperature, in agreement with previous visible light characterization studies. However, phase-contrast enhanced x-ray imaging provides a more robust surface roughness measurement than visible light methods. The new x-ray imaging results demonstrate clearly that the surface roughness decreases with time for solid D-T layers held at 1.5 K below the melting temperature.
Date: April 19, 2006
Creator: Kozioziemski, B J; Sater, J D; Moody, J D; Montgomery, D S & Gautier, C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interplanetary space transport using inertial fusion propulsion

Description: In this paper, we indicate how the great advantages that ICF offers for interplanetary propulsion can be accomplished with the VISTA spacecraft concept. The performance of VISTA is expected to surpass that from other realistic technologies for Mars missions if the energy gain achievable for ICF targets is above several hundred. Based on the good performance expected from the U. S. National Ignition Facility (NIF), the requirements for VISTA should be well within the realm of possibility if creative target concepts such as the fast ignitor can be developed. We also indicate that a 6000-ton VISTA can visit any planet in the solar system and return to Earth in about 7 years or less without any significant physiological hazards to astronauts. In concept, VISTA provides such short-duration missions, especially to Mars, that the hazards from cosmic radiation and zero gravity can be reduced to insignificant levels. VISTA therefore represents a significant step forward for space-propulsion concepts.
Date: April 20, 1998
Creator: Orth, C.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reflectivity of plasmas created by high-intensity, ultra-short laser pulses

Description: Experiments were performed to characterize the creation and evolution of high-temperature (T{sub e}{approximately}100eV), high-density (n{sub e}>10{sup 22}cm{sup {minus}3}) plasmas created with intense ({approximately}10{sup 12}-10{sup 16}W/cm{sup 2}), ultra-short (130fs) laser pulses. The principle diagnostic was plasma reflectivity at optical wavelengths (614nm). An array of target materials (Al, Au, Si, SiO{sub 2}) with widely differing electronic properties tested plasma behavior over a large set of initial states. Time-integrated plasma reflectivity was measured as a function of laser intensity. Space- and time-resolved reflectivity, transmission and scatter were measured with a spatial resolution of {approximately}3{mu}m and a temporal resolution of 130fs. An amplified, mode-locked dye laser system was designed to produce {approximately}3.5mJ, {approximately}130fs laser pulses to create and nonintrusively probe the plasmas. Laser prepulse was carefully controlled to suppress preionization and give unambiguous, high-density plasma results. In metals (Al and Au), it is shown analytically that linear and nonlinear inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption, resonance absorption, and vacuum heating explain time-integrated reflectivity at intensities near 10{sup 16}W/cm{sup 2}. In the insulator, SiO{sub 2}, a non-equilibrium plasma reflectivity model using tunneling ionization, Helmholtz equations, and Drude conductivity agrees with time-integrated reflectivity measurements. Moreover, a comparison of ionization and Saha equilibration rates shows that plasma formed by intense, ultra-short pulses can exist with a transient, non-equilibrium distribution of ionization states. All targets are shown to approach a common reflectivity at intensities {approximately}10{sup 16}W/cm{sup 2}, indicating a material-independent state insensitive to atomic or solid-state details.
Date: June 1, 1994
Creator: Gold, D.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

Description: Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the world’s largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.
Date: August 29, 2012
Creator: Ross, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aneutronic Fusion in a Degenerate Plasma

Description: In a Fermi-degenerate plasma, the electronic stopping of a slow ion is smaller than that given by the classical formula, because some transitions between the electron states are forbidden. The bremsstrahlung losses are then smaller, so that the nuclear burning of an aneutronic fuel is more efficient. Consequently, there occurs a parameter regime in which self-burning is possible. Practical obstacles in this regime that must be overcome before net energy can be realized include the compression of the fuel to an ultra dense state and the creation of a hot spot.
Date: September 3, 2004
Creator: Son, S. & Fisch, N.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

New polymer target-shell properties and characterizations. Appendix A

Description: A method for characterizing ICF target shells is presented, based on measurement of the gas released from a single shell into a small volume. It utilizes cryogenic permeation systems developed in connection with our work on ICF targets containing nuclear spin-polarized deuterium. Permeation rates for polystyrene and parylene-coated-polystyrene shells are measured at temperatures from 350K down to 180K. Burst or implosion pressure can be determined over a full temperature range down to 20K. Shell temperature is calculated from its gas leakage rate, calibrated by permeation measurements over the temperature range. Lag of shell temperature compared with sample-chamber temperature during warming of the latter is attributed to the weakness of the thermal link provided by both radiative heat transfer and free molecular conduction with small accommodation coefficients for helium and deuterium gas at the structure to which the shell is conductively linked, or at the surface of a conductively isolated shell. Quantification of this lag can provide a measure of atomic scale roughness of the shell outer surface. Also presented are reversible pre-rupture leakage phenomena for polystyrene and parylene-coated-polystyrene shells.
Date: December 31, 1993
Creator: Honig, A.; Wei, X.; Fan, Q.; Alexander, N. & Palmer, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Elise - the next step in development of induction heavy ion drivers for inertial fusion energy

Description: LBL, with the participation of LLNL and industry, proposes to build Elise, an electric-focused accelerator as the next logical step towards the eventual goal of a heavy-ion induction linac powerful enough to implode or {open_quotes}drive{close_quotes} inertial-confinement fusion targets. Elise will be at full driver scale in several important parameters-most notably line charge density (a function of beam size), which was not explored in earlier experiments. Elise will be capable of accelerating and electrostatically focusing four parallel, full-scale ion beams and will be designed to be extendible, by successive future construction projects, to meet the goal of the USA DOE Inertial Fusion Energy program (IFE). This goal is to address all remaining issues in heavy-ion IFE except target physics, which is currently the responsibility of DOE Defense Programs, and the target chamber. Thus Elise is the first step of a program that will provide a solid foundation of data for further progress toward a driver, as called for in the National Energy Strategy and National Energy Policy Act.
Date: November 1, 1994
Creator: Lee, E.; Bangerter, R. O.; Celata, C.; Faltens, A.; Fessenden, T.; Peters, C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress in ion beam power coupling and ion-driven hohlraums on PBFA II

Description: Light ions could provide an efficient driver for high-yield and energy applications of inertial confinement fusion. Working towards this goal, the authors have demonstrated well-diagnosed, ion-driven hohlraum targets at {approximately} 60 eV radiation temperature on the PBFA II accelerator, with specific power deposition of 800-1400 TW/gm. This parameter regime is of interest to both light- and heavy-ion drivers, and corresponds to the early phase of a high-yield target drive. Further increases in target temperature require increasing the ion beam driver intensity. Direct measurements of ion diode dynamics are providing insights to improve driver capability. Maximum beam intensity is obtained by both increasing the coupled lithium beam power and decreasing the beam microdivergence. The microdivergence of the beam near the ion source appears to be a major contributor early in the beam pulse. Experiments have shown that a parasitic non-lithium ion beam consumes a large fraction of the available power. Calculations indicate the coupled beam power can be increased by up to a factor of 3 by eliminating this parasitic loss. Preliminary experiments to clean the ion diode surfaces are under way.
Date: January 1, 1995
Creator: Filuk, A. B.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Adams, R. G.; Allshouse, G. O.; Aubert, J. H.; Bacon, L. D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final amplifier design and mercury

Description: The final amplifier for the Mercury KrF excimer facility is being designed. The design exercise involves extensive modeling to predict amplifier performance. Models of the pulsed-power system, including a Child-Langmuir diode with closure, electron-beam energy deposition, KrF laser kinetics, amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), a time-dependent laser extraction in the presence of ASE are presented as a design package. The design exercise indicates that the energy objective of Phase I -- 100 joules -- will be met.
Date: December 31, 1991
Creator: Rose, E. A. & Hanson, D. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development report. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

Description: On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities which took place under this contract during the period of October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. During this period, GA was assigned 18 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included ``Capabilities Activation`` and ``Capabilities Demonstration`` to enable us to begin production of glass and composite polymer capsules. Capsule delivery tasks included ``Small Glass Shell Deliveries`` and ``Composite Polymer Capsules`` for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). We also were asked to provide direct ``Onsite Support`` at LLNL and LANL. We continued planning for the transfer of ``Micromachining Equipment from Rocky Flats`` and established ``Target Component Micromachining and Electroplating Facilities`` at GA. We fabricated over 1100 films and filters of 11 types for Sandia National Laboratory and provided full-time onsite engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to make targets for the Naval Research Laboratory. We investigated spherical interferometry, built an automated capsule sorter, and developed an apparatus for calorimetric measurement of fuel fill for LLNL. We assisted LANL in the ``Characterization of Opaque b-Layered Targets.`` We developed deuterated and UV-opaque polymers for use by the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) and devised a triple-orifice droplet generator to demonstrate the controlled-mass nature of the microencapsulation process.
Date: March 1, 1994
Creator: Steinman, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Neutron detectors for fusion reaction-rate measurements

Description: Fusion reactions in an inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) target filled with deuterium or a deuterium/tritium fuel release nearly monoenergetic neutrons. Because most the neutrons leave the compressed target without collision, they preserve reaction-rate information as they travel radially outward from their point of origin. Three fast, neutron detector techniques, each capable of measuring the fusion reaction-rate of ICF targets, have been demonstrated. The most advanced detector is based on the fast rise-time of a commercial plastic scintillator material (BC-422) which acts as a neutron-to-light converter. Signals, which are recorded with a fast optical streak camera, have a resolution of 25 ps. Good signals can be recorded for targets producing only 5 x 10{sup 7} DT neutrons. Two other detectors use knock-on collisions between neutrons and protons in a thin polyethylene (CH{sub 2}) converter. In one, the converter is placed in front of the photocathode of an x-ray streak camera. Recoil protons pass through the photocathode and knock out electrons which are accelerated and deflected to produce a signal. Resolutions < 25 ps are possible. In the other, the converter is placed in front of a microchannel plate (MCP) with a gated microstrip. Recoil protons eject electrons from the gold layer forming the microstrip. If a gate pulse is present, the signal is amplified. Present gate times are about 80 ps.
Date: February 10, 1994
Creator: Lerche, R. A.; Phillion, D. W.; Landen, O. L.; Murphy, T. J. & Jaanimagi, P. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HYLIFE-II reactor chamber design refinements

Description: Mechanical design features of the reactor chamber for the HYLIFE-II inertial confinement fusion power plant are presented. A combination of oscillating and steady, molten salt streams (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) are used for shielding and blast protection of the chamber walls. The system is designed for a 6 Hz repetition rate. Beam path clearing, between shots, is accomplished with the oscillating flow. The mechanism for generating the oscillating streams is described. A design configuration of the vessel wall allows adequate cooling and provides extra shielding to reduce thermal stresses to tolerable levels. The bottom portion of the reactor chamber is designed to minimize splash back of the high velocity (>12 m/s) salt streams and also recover up to half of the dynamic head. Cost estimates for a 1 GWe and 2 GWe reactor chamber are presented.
Date: June 1, 1994
Creator: House, P. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Inertial fusion with ultra-powerful lasers

Description: Ultra-high intensity lasers can be used to ignite ICF capsules with a few tens of kilojoules of light and can lead to high gain with as little as 100 kilojoules of incident laser light. We propose a scheme with three phases. First, a capsule is imploded as in the conventional approach to inertial fusion to assemble a high density fuel configuration. Second, a hole is bored through capsule corona composed of ablated material, pushing critical density close to the high density core of the capsule, by employing the ponderomotive force associated with high intensity laser light. Finally, the fuel is ignited by suprathermal electrons, produced in the high intensity laser plasma interactions, which propagate from critical density to this high density core. This paper reviews two models of energy gain in ICF capsules and explains why ultra-high intensity lasers allow access to the model producing the higher gains. This new scheme also drastically reduces the difficulty of the implosion and thereby allows lower quality fabrication and less stringent beam quality and symmetry requirements from the implosion driver. The difficulty of the fusion scheme is transferred to the technological difficulty of producing the ultra-high-intensity laser and of transporting this energy to the fuel.
Date: October 1, 1993
Creator: Tabak, M.; Hammer, J.; Glinsky, M.; Kruer, W.; Wilks, S.; Woodworth, J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department