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Detectability and printability of EUVL mask blank defects for the32 nm HP node

Description: The readiness of a defect-free extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask blank infrastructure is one of the main enablers for the insertion of EUVL technology into production. It is essential to have sufficient defect detection capability and understanding of defect printability to develop a defect-free EUVL mask blank infrastructure. The SEMATECH Mask Blank Development Center (MBDC) has been developing EUVL mask blanks with low defect densities with the Lasertec M1350 and M7360, the 1st and 2nd generations, respectively, of visible light EUVL mask blank inspection tools. Although the M7360 represents a significant improvement in our defect detection capability, it is time to start developing a 3rd generation tool for EUVL mask blank inspection. The goal of this tool is to detect all printable defects; therefore, understanding defect printability criteria is critical to this tool development. In this paper, we will investigate the defect detectability of a 2nd generation blank inspection tool and a patterned EUVL mask inspection tool. We will also compare the ability of the inspection tools to detect programmed defects whose printability has been estimated from wafer printing results and actinic aerial images results.
Date: August 1, 2007
Creator: Cho, Wonil; Han, Hak-Seung; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Kearney,Patrick A. & Jeon, Chan-Uk
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

REMOTE DETECTION OF INTERNAL PIPELINE CORROSION USING FLUIDIZED SENSORS

Description: Pipelines present a unique challenge to monitoring because of the great geographical distances they cover, their burial depth, their age, and the need to keep the product flowing without much interruption. Most other engineering structures that require monitoring do not pose such combined challenges. In this regard, a pipeline system can be considered analogous to the blood vessels in the human body. The human body has an extensive ''pipeline'' through which blood and other fluids are transported. The brain can generally sense damage to the system at any location and alert the body to provide temporary repair, unless the damage is severe. This is accomplished through a vast network of fixed and floating sensors combined with a vast and extremely complex communication/decision making system. The project described in this report mimics the distributed sensor system of our body, albeit in a much more rudimentary fashion. Internal corrosion is an important factor in pipeline integrity management. At present, the methods to assess internal corrosion in pipelines all have certain limitations. In-line inspection tools are costly and cannot be used in all pipelines. Because there is a significant time interval between inspections, any impact due to upsets in pipeline operations can be missed. Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment (ICDA) is a procedure that can be used to identify locations of possible internal corrosion. However, the uncertainties in the procedure require excavation and location of damage using more detailed inspection tools. Non-intrusive monitoring techniques can be used to monitor internal corrosion, but these tools also require pipeline excavation and are limited in the spatial extent of corrosion they can examine. Therefore, a floating sensor system that can deposit at locations of water accumulation and communicate the corrosion information to an external location is needed. To accomplish this, the project is divided into four main ...
Date: October 31, 2005
Creator: Sridhar, Narasi; Tormoen, Garth & Sabata, Ashok
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reduced Mandated Inspection by Remote Field Eddy Current Inspection of Unpiggable Pipelines

Description: The Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique is ideal for inspecting unpiggable pipelines because all of its components can be made much smaller than the diameter of the pipe to be inspected. For this reason, RFEC was chosen as a technology for unpiggable pipeline inspections by DOE-NETL with the support of OTD and PRCI, to be integrated with platforms selected by DOENETL. As part of the project, the RFEC laboratory facilities were upgraded and data collection was made nearly autonomous. The resulting improved data collection speeds allowed GTI to test more variables to improve the performance of the combined RFEC and platform technologies. Tests were conducted on 6-, 8-, and 12-inch seamless and seam-welded pipes. Testing on the 6-inch pipes included using seven exciter coils, each of different geometry with an initial focus on preparing the technology for use on an autonomous robotic platform with limited battery capacity. Reductions in power consumption proved successful. Tests with metal components similar to the Explorer II modules were performed to check for interference with the electromagnetic fields. The results of these tests indicated RFEC would be able to produce quality inspections while on the robot. Mechanical constraints imposed by the platform, power requirements, control and communication protocols, and potential busses and connectors were addressed. Much work went into sensor module design including the mechanics and electronic diagrams and schematics. GTI participated in two Technology Demonstrations for inspection technologies held at Battelle Laboratories. GTI showed excellent detection and sizing abilities for natural corrosion. Following the demonstration, module building commenced but was stopped when funding reductions did not permit continued development for the selected robotic platform. Conference calls were held between GTI and its sponsors to resolve the issue of how to proceed with reduced funding. The project was rescoped for 10-16-inch pipes with the ...
Date: September 29, 2006
Creator: Teitsma, Albert & Maupin, Julie
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Light duty utility arm startup plan

Description: This plan details the methods and procedures necessary to ensure a safe transition in the operation of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) System. The steps identified here outline the work scope and identify responsibilities to complete startup, and turnover of the LDUA to Characterization Project Operations (CPO).
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Barnes, G.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Laser Metrology/Viewing System for ITER In-Vessel Inspection

Description: This paper identifies the requirements for a remotely operated precision laser ranging system for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The inspection system is used for metrology and viewing, and must be capable of achieving submillimeter accuracy and operation in a reactor vessel that has high gamma radiation, high vacuum, elevated temperature, and magnetic field levels. A coherent, frequency modulated laser radar system is under development to meet these requirements. The metrology/viewing sensor consists of a compact laser-optic module linked through fiberoptics to the laser source and imaging units, located outside the harsh environment. The deployment mechanism is a remotely operated telescopic mast. Gamma irradiation up to 10{sup 7} Gy was conducted on critical sensor components with no significant impact to data transmission, and analysis indicates that critical sensor components can operate in a magnetic field with certain design modifications. Plans for testing key components in a magnetic field are underway.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Spampinato, P.T.; Barry, R.E.; Chesser, J.B.; Menon, M.M.; Dagher, M.A. & Slotwinski, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A survey of repair practices for nuclear power plant containment metallic pressure boundaries

Description: The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to provide assistance in their assessment of the effects of potential degradation on the structural integrity and leaktightness of metal containment vessels and steel liners of concrete containments in nuclear power plants. One of the program objectives is to identify repair practices for restoring metallic containment pressure boundary components that have been damaged or degraded in service. This report presents issues associated with inservice condition assessments and continued service evaluations and identifies the rules and requirements for the repair and replacement of nonconforming containment pressure boundary components by welding or metal removal. Discussion topics include base and welding materials, welding procedure and performance qualifications, inspection techniques, testing methods, acceptance criteria, and documentation requirements necessary for making acceptable repairs and replacements so that the plant can be returned to a safe operating condition.
Date: May 1998
Creator: Oland, C. B. & Naus, D. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The 1997 NRC IST workshops and the status of questions and issues directed to the ASME O and M committee

Description: This paper describes the results of the four NRC Inservice Testing (IST) Workshops which were held in early 1997 pertaining to NRC Inspection Procedure P 73756, Inservice Testing of Pumps and Valves. It also presents the status of the ASME code committees` resolution of certain questions forwarded to the ASME by the NRC. These questions relate to code interpretations, inconsistencies in the code, and industry concerns that are most appropriately resolved through the ASME consensus process. The ASME committees reviewed the questions at their December 1997 and March 1998 code meetings. Of particular interest are those questions for which the ASME code committees did not agree with the NRC response. These questions, as well as those which the committees provided some additional insight or input, are presented in this paper.
Date: May 1, 1998
Creator: DiBiasio, A. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of code improvements in the 1992, 1994, and 1996 addenda of the OM Code

Description: NRC has initiated a rulemaking to 10CFR50.55a that would allow Owners to voluntarily update their pump and valve inservice testing programs to the 1995 Edition of the OM Code. The 1992 and 1994 Addenda, and 1995 Edition of the OM Code offers many improvements, eg, clarifications and relaxations, to the 1989 Edition of Section XI or the 1990 Edition of the OM Code. This paper reviews the code changes that may be advantageous for Owners to use, and discusses their related requirements. Additionally, code improvements in the newly issued 1996 Addenda of the OM Code are discussed, as they may be proposed under 10CFR50.55a(a)(3)(i).
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: DiBiasio, A. & Grove, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT OF NONLINEAR HARMONIC SENSORS FOR DETECTION OF MECHANICAL DAMAGE

Description: In a joint effort with Tuboscope Pipeline Services of Houston, Texas, Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) adapted its nonlinear harmonic (NLH) sensing technology for use on a new in-line inspection system (smart pig). Nonlinear harmonics, an AC magnetic method for detecting local anomalies of stress and plastic deformation, shows promise of improved characterization of mechanical damage defects such as gouged dents, even though the dents may have re-rounded. The SwRI-Tuboscope project produced a sensor design, electronic design, and sensor suspension design that are directly adaptable to a multitechnology ILI system. This report describes the NLH method, the sensor, circuit, and suspension designs, and shows results from the supporting laboratory work.
Date: March 1, 2004
Creator: Crouch, Alfred E.; Dean, Alan; Torres, Carl & Aron, Jeff
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEFECT ASSESSMENT USING CONFORMABLE ARRAY DATA

Description: This report covers the design and fabrication of a conformable eddy current array useful for the mapping and measurement of external corrosion on a transmission pipeline. The feasibility of the basic measuring approach was demonstrated and the general guidelines for sensor design were disclosed in a previous project. This project was concerned with design of a practical array, development of interface electronics, and design of the operation and analysis software. A prototype system was constructed, checked out, and demonstrated on natural corrosion in a field environment.
Date: December 1, 2003
Creator: Crouch, Alfred E. & Goyen, Todd H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEVELOPMENT OF AN INSPECTION PLATFORM AND A SUITE OF SENSORS FOR ASSESSING CORROSION AND MECHANICAL DAMAGE ON UNPIGGABLE TRANSMISSION MAINS

Description: This development program is a joint effort among the Northeast Gas Association (formerly New York Gas Group), Foster-Miller, Inc., and the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The total cost of the project is $772,525, with the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the US Department of Energy contributing $572,525, and the Northeast Gas Association contributing $200,000. The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during its fourth three-month period (from July 2003 through September 2003). The efforts of the project focused during this period in completing the assessment of the tether technology, which is intended to be used as the means of communication between robot and operator, in designing the MFL sensor module, in completing the kinematic studies, and in initiating tractor design. In addition, work on the ovality sensor progressed significantly, while work on system integration was initiated focusing at this point in time on module coupling. Results to date indicate that the robotic system under design will be able to meet most of the design specifications initially specified. Earlier concerns regarding the portability of the system are shown to be a non-issue, with new more detailed analysis showing that from a locomotor point of view an inspection of a 16 inch-24 inch pipe size range with a single platform is most likely possible However, the limitations imposed by the sensor are more restrictive, preliminary results indicating an inspection range of 16 inch-20 inch pipe sizes. In addition, tether use will most likely have to be limited to medium and low flow conditions in order to preserve tether integrity.
Date: January 14, 2004
Creator: Vradis, George C. & Leary, Bill
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CIRCUMFERENTIAL MFL IN-LINE INSPECTION FOR CRACKS IN PIPELINES

Description: Circumferential MFL is a new implementation of a widely used technology that has potential to provide improved detection and quantification of axially oriented defects such as cracks, seam weld defects, mechanical damage, and groove corrosion. This implementation works by orienting the magnetic field around the pipe rather that along the axis. By orienting the magnetic field around the pipe (the circumferential direction), the axial defects that were magnetically transparent can disrupt more of the magnetic field and can be more easily detected. Initial implementations of circumferential MFL have found that flux leakage from cracks at the interior of the pipe is small, and the signals from cracks are difficult to detect. The objective of this project is to improve detection of cracks by changing the implementation along with using data from overlapping and complementary inspection techniques. Two technology enhancements were investigated: Combining high- and low-magnetization technology for stress detection; and Combining axial and circumferential MFL methods. Although a method combining high- and low-magnetization technology showed promise for characterizing gouges cause by third party excavation equipment, its commercial development was not successful for two reasons. First, the stress diminishes the crack signal, while the opening of the crack increases the signal. The stress-induced changes in flux leakage around cracks were small and any critical information on the severity of cracks and crack-like defects is difficult to distinguish from changes caused by the crack opening and other inspection variables. Second, it is difficult to magnetize pipe material in the circumferential direction. A relatively low, non-uniform magnetization level produced by the circumferential magnetizer makes detection of changes due to stress extremely difficult. This project also examined combining axial and circumferential MFL to improve crack detection and distinguish cracks for axially oriented volumetric defects. While successful results are presented in this report, circumferential MFL ...
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Nestleroth, J. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

INNOVATIVE ELECTROMAGNETIC SENSORS FOR PIPELINE CRAWLERS

Description: Internal inspection of pipelines is an important tool for ensuring safe and reliable delivery of fossil energy products. Current inspection systems that are propelled through the pipeline by the product flow cannot be used to inspect all pipelines because of the various physical barriers they encounter. Recent development efforts include a new generation of powered inspection platforms that crawl slowly inside a pipeline and are able to maneuver past the physical barriers that can limit inspection. At Battelle, innovative electromagnetic sensors are being designed and tested for these new pipeline crawlers. The various sensor types can be used to assess a wide range of pipeline anomalies including corrosion, mechanical damage, and cracks. The Applied Energy Systems Group at Battelle is in the second year of work on a projected three-year development effort. In the first year, two innovative electromagnetic inspection technologies were designed and tested. Both were based on moving high-strength permanent magnets to generate inspection energy. One system involved translating permanent magnets towards the pipe. A pulse of electric current would be induced in the pipe to oppose the magnetization according to Lenz's Law. The decay of this pulse would indicate the presence of defects in the pipe wall. This inspection method is similar to pulsed eddy current inspection methods, with the fundamental difference being the manner in which the current is generated. Details of this development effort were reported in the first semiannual report on this project. The second inspection methodology is based on rotating permanent magnets. The rotating exciter unit produces strong eddy currents in the pipe wall. At distances of a pipe diameter or more from the rotating exciter, the currents flow circumferentially. These circumferential currents are deflected by pipeline defects such as corrosion and axially aligned cracks. Simple sensors are used to detect the change ...
Date: May 23, 2005
Creator: Nestleroth, J. Bruce & Davis, Richard J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assuring Mechanical Integrity of Refinery Equipment Through Global ON-Stream Inspection

Description: The development of global on-stream inspection technology will have a dramatic effect on how refinery operations are managed in the U.S. in the future. Global on-stream inspection will provide assurance of the mechanical integrity of critical plant equipment and will allow refineries to operate more efficiently with less impact on our environment and with an increased margin of safety.
Date: February 22, 2006
Creator: Berthold, John W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Innovative Sensors for Pipeline Crawlers: Rotating Permanent Magnet Inspection

Description: Internal inspection of pipelines is an important tool for ensuring safe and reliable delivery of fossil energy products. Current inspection systems that are propelled through the pipeline by the product flow cannot be used to inspect all pipelines because of the various physical barriers they may encounter. To facilitate inspection of these ''unpiggable'' pipelines, recent inspection development efforts have focused on a new generation of powered inspection platforms that are able to crawl slowly inside a pipeline and can maneuver past the physical barriers that limit internal inspection applicability, such as bore restrictions, low product flow rate, and low pressure. The first step in this research was to review existing inspection technologies for applicability and compatibility with crawler systems. Most existing inspection technologies, including magnetic flux leakage and ultrasonic methods, had significant implementation limitations including mass, physical size, inspection energy coupling requirements and technology maturity. The remote field technique was the most promising but power consumption was high and anomaly signals were low requiring sensitive detectors and electronics. After reviewing each inspection technology, it was decided to investigate the potential for a new inspection method. The new inspection method takes advantage of advances in permanent magnet strength, along with their wide availability and low cost. Called rotating permanent magnet inspection (RPMI), this patent pending technology employs pairs of permanent magnets rotating around the central axis of a cylinder to induce high current densities in the material under inspection. Anomalies and wall thickness variations are detected with an array of sensors that measure local changes in the magnetic field produced by the induced current flowing in the material. This inspection method is an alternative to the common concentric coil remote field technique that induces low-frequency eddy currents in ferromagnetic pipes and tubes. Since this is a new inspection method, both theory ...
Date: September 30, 2006
Creator: Nestleroth, J. Bruce; Davis, Richard J. & Flamberg, Stephanie
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Innovative Electromagnetic Sensors for Pipeline Crawlers

Description: Internal inspection of pipelines is an important tool for ensuring safe and reliable delivery of fossil energy products. Current inspection systems that are propelled through the pipeline by the product flow cannot be used to inspect all pipelines because of the various physical barriers they encounter. Recent development efforts include a new generation of powered inspection platforms that crawl slowly inside a pipeline and are able to maneuver past the physical barriers that can limit inspection. At Battelle, innovative electromagnetic sensors are being designed and tested for these new pipeline crawlers. The various sensor types can be used to assess a wide range of pipeline anomalies including corrosion, mechanical damage, and cracks. Battelle is in the final year on a projected three-year development effort. In the first year, two innovative electromagnetic inspection technologies were designed and tested. Both were based on moving high-strength permanent magnets to generate inspection energy. One system involved translating permanent magnets towards the pipe. A pulse of electric current would be induced in the pipe to oppose the magnetization according to Lenz's Law. The decay of this pulse would indicate the presence of defects in the pipe wall. This inspection method is similar to pulsed eddy current inspection methods, with the fundamental difference being the manner in which the current is generated. Details of this development effort were reported in the first semiannual report on this project. The second inspection methodology is based on rotating permanent magnets. The rotating exciter unit produces strong eddy currents in the pipe wall. At distances of a pipe diameter or more from the rotating exciter, the currents flow circumferentially. These circumferential currents are deflected by pipeline defects such as corrosion and axially aligned cracks. Simple sensors are used to detect the change in current densities in the pipe wall. The ...
Date: May 4, 2006
Creator: Nestleroth, J. Bruce
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

INNOVATIVE ELECTROMAGNETIC SENSORS FOR PIPELINE CRAWLERS

Description: Internal inspection of pipelines is an important tool for ensuring safe and reliable delivery of fossil energy products. Current inspection systems that are propelled through the pipeline by the product flow cannot be used to inspect all pipelines because of the various physical barriers they encounter. Recent development efforts include a new generation of powered inspection platforms that crawl slowly inside a pipeline and are able to maneuver past the physical barriers that can limit inspection. At Battelle, innovative electromagnetic sensors are being designed and tested for these new pipeline crawlers. The various sensor types can be used to assess a wide range of pipeline anomalies including corrosion, mechanical damage, and cracks. Battelle has completed the second year of work on a projected three-year development effort. In the first year, two innovative electromagnetic inspection technologies were designed and tested. Both were based on moving high-strength permanent magnets to generate inspection energy. One system involved translating permanent magnets towards the pipe. A pulse of electric current would be induced in the pipe to oppose the magnetization according to Lenz's Law. The decay of this pulse would indicate the presence of defects in the pipe wall. This inspection method is similar to pulsed eddy current inspection methods, with the fundamental difference being the manner in which the current is generated. Details of this development effort were reported in the first semiannual report on this project. The second inspection methodology is based on rotating permanent magnets. The rotating exciter unit produces strong eddy currents in the pipe wall. At distances of a pipe diameter or more from the rotating exciter, the currents flow circumferentially. These circumferential currents are deflected by pipeline defects such as corrosion and axially aligned cracks. Simple sensors are used to detect the change in current densities in the pipe ...
Date: November 30, 2005
Creator: Nestleroth, J. Bruce
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Computer programs for the acquisition and analysis of eddy-current array probe data

Description: Objective of the Improved Eddy-Curent ISI (in-service inspection) for Steam Generators Tubing program is to upgrade and validate eddy-current inspections, including probes, instrumentation, and data processing techniques for ISI of new, used, and repaired steam generator tubes; to improve defect detection, classification and characterization as affected by diameter and thickness variations, denting, probe wobble, tube sheet, tube supports, copper and sludge deposits, even when defect types and other variables occur in combination; to transfer this advanced technology to NRC`s mobile NDE laboratory and staff. This report documents computer programs that were developed for acquisition of eddy-current data from specially designed 16-coil array probes. Complete code as well as instructions for use are provided.
Date: July 1, 1996
Creator: Pate, J.R. & Dodd, C.V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design and demonstration of an analysis Information system for magnetic flux leakage inspection of natural gas pipeline. Final letter report

Description: A staff exchange was conducted for the mutual benefit of the Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute (GRI), Vetco Pipeline Services Inc. (VPSI), and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. This staff exchange provided direct exposure by a Laboratory staff member knowledgeable in inspection, integrity assessment, and robotic capabilities of the Laboratory to the needs of the natural gas pipeline industry. The project included an assignment to the GRI Pipeline Simulation Facility (PSF) during the period preceding the commissioning of the flow loop. GRI is interested in exploiting advanced technology at the National Laboratories. To provide a sense of the market impact, it is estimated that $3 billion was spent in 1993 for the repair, renovation, and replacement of distribution piping. GRI has goals of saving the distribution industry $500 million in Operations and Maintenance costs and having an additional $250M savings impact on transmission pipelines. The objectives of the project included: (1) For PNNL staff to present technology to GRI and PSF staff on non- destructive evaluation, robotics, ground penetrating radar, and risk based inspection guidelines for application to the operation and maintenance of natural gas pipelines. (2) For GRI and PSF staff to discuss with PNNL staff opportunities for improving the industrial competitiveness of operation and maintenance services. (3) To explore the basis for partnership with GRI and PSF staff on technology transfer topics. In this project, staff exchanges were conducted to GRI`s Pipeline Simulation Facility and to VPSI. PNNL . staff had access to the $10M GRI Pipeline Simulation Facility (PSF) at West Jefferson, Ohio. The facility has a 4,700-ft. long pipe loop, an NDE laboratory, and a data analysis laboratory. PNNL staff had access to the VPSI`s facility in Houston, TX. VPSI has developed some of the most sophisticated inspection tools currently used in the pipeline ...
Date: October 1, 1996
Creator: Schuster, G.J. & Saffell, B.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced weigh-in-motion system for weighing vehicles at high speed

Description: A state-of-the-art, Advanced Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) system has been designed, installed, and tested on the west bound side of Interstate I-75/I-40 near the Knox County Weigh Station. The project is a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and International Road Dynamics, Inc. (IRD) sponsored by the Office of Uranium Programs, Facility and Technology Management Division of the Department of Energy under CRADA No. ORNL95-0364. ORNL, IRD, the Federal Highway Administration, the Tennessee Department of Safety and the Tennessee Department of Transportation have developed a National High Speed WIM Test Facility for test and evaluation of high-speed WIM systems. The WIM system under evaluation includes a Single Load Cell WIM scale system supplied and installed by IRD. ORNL developed a stand-alone, custom data acquisition system, which acquires the raw signals from IRD`s in-ground single load cell transducers. Under a separate contract with the Federal Highway Administration, ORNL designed and constructed a laboratory scale house for data collection, analysis and algorithm development. An initial advanced weight-determining algorithm has been developed. The new advanced WIM system provides improved accuracy and can reduce overall system variability by up to 30% over the existing high accuracy commercial WIM system.
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Beshears, D.L.; Muhs, J.D. & Scudiere, M.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An evaluation of human factors research for ultrasonic inservice inspection

Description: This work was undertaken to determine if human factors research has yielded information applicable to upgrading requirements in ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section XI, improving methods and techniques in Section V, and/or suggesting relevant research. A preference was established for information and recommendations which have become accepted and standard practice. Manual Ultrasonic Testing/Inservice Inspection (UT/ISI) is a complex task subject to influence by dozens of variables. This review frequently revealed equivocal findings regarding effects of environmental variables as well as repeated indications that inspection performance may be more, and more reliably, influenced by the workers` social environment, including managerial practices, than by other situational variables. Also of significance are each inspector`s relevant knowledge, skills, and abilities, and determination of these is seen as a necessary first step in upgrading requirements, methods, and techniques as well as in focusing research in support of such programs, While understanding the effects and mediating mechanisms of the variables impacting inspection performance is a worthwhile pursuit for researchers, initial improvements in industrial UTASI performance may be achieved by implementing practices already known to mitigate the effects of potentially adverse conditions. 52 refs., 2 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1998
Creator: Pond, D.J.; Donohoo, D.T. & Harris, R.V. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experience with ANSI N14.30 for in-service inspections of semi-trailer used for spent fuel shipments

Description: On July 18, 1996, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resumed shipping spent fuel in interstate commerce after a 10 year suspension of this activity. This shipment was conducted using a Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensed spent fuel transport package purchased from General Electric Company by ORNL for the purpose of moving High Flux Isotope Reactor spent fuel to the Savannah River Site. The trailer, fabricated to the ANSI N14.30, Semi-Trailers Employed in the Highway Transport of Weight Concentrated Radioactive Loads Design, Fabrication, and Maintenance, has recently undergone its first scheduled in-service inspection. This paper presents the experience gained from interpretation and application of the ANSI N14.30 standard focusing on the in-service inspection for the structure of the trailer. Initially, the term weight concentrated is illustrated giving detail to the location and center of gravity of the 33,500 pound shipping container and forces induced by the tie down system. Basic information about the design stresses and initial testing provided by the manufacturer are used as a lead-in to the requirements of the standard. The task of examining the trailer structure provided many lessons and required considerable effort. All of the support personnel were provided by ORNL; the garage mechanics and the certified inspection engineers had never been involved in applying ANSI N14.30. Other obstacles were the lack of existing inspection procedures for this particular activity and the lack of a previous experience interpreting the standard with regard to repair work. Some of these questions were resolved by clarification received from the writers of the standard, and others were resolved by the teamwork between the manufacturer and ORNL. This experience illustrated the importance of the trailer manufacturer as a participant in the decisions made concerning in-service inspection and maintenance.
Date: May 1, 1998
Creator: Hirtz, G.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

In-service motor performance diagnostics. Final CRADA report

Description: Efficiency evaluation of in-service motors is a challenge to industry. Without a dynamometer or torque cell attached, determining the output power is difficult. The purpose of this CRADA was to develop an on-line motor monitoring device that will determine the condition and performance of a motor without removing the motor from operation.
Date: April 15, 1997
Creator: Bunch, S.L.; Otaduy, P.J.; Kueck, J.D.; Staunton, R.H. & Bach, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Steam generator mock-up for assessment of inservice inspection technology.

Description: A steam generator mock-up has been assembled for round-robin studies of the effectiveness of currently practiced inservice inspection (ISI) technology for detection of current-day flaws. The mock-up will also be used to evaluate emerging inspection technologies. The 3.66-m (12-ft.)-tall mock-up contains 400 tube openings, each consisting of 9 test sections that can be used to simulate current-day field-induced flaws and artifacts. Included in the mock-up are simulations of tube support plate (TSP) intersections and the tube sheet (TS). Cracks are present at the TSP, TS, and in the free span sections of the mock-up. For initial evaluation of the round-robin results, various eddy current methods, as well as multivariate models for data analysis techniques, are being used to estimate the depth and length of defects in the mock-up. To ensure that the round-robin is carried out with procedures as close as possible to those implemented in the field, input was obtained from industry experts on the protocol and procedures to be used for the exercise. One initial assembly of the mock-up with a limited number of flaws and artifact has been completed and tested. A second completed configuration with additional flaw and artifacts simulations will be used for the round-robin.
Date: September 11, 1999
Creator: Bakhtiari, S.; Kupperman, D. S. & Muscara, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department