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Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

Description: Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Pomes, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mechanism of hydrogen incorporation in coal liquefaction. Quarterly progress report, April 1995--June 1995

Description: Mechanisms important to coal liquefaction and hydrogen transfer in coal liquefaction are being investigated. We continued our studies of the reactions of various organic compounds with D{sub 2}. Also described in this report is the success of hydrogenating naphthalene utilizing silica as a catalyst.
Date: September 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Role of aromatic structure in pathways of hydrogen transfer and bond cleavage in coal liquefaction: Theoretical studies

Description: The mechanisms by which strong carbon-carbon bonds between aromatic rings and side chains are cleaved under hydropyrolysis conditions remain a subject of wide interest to fuel science. Recently, the authors have studied in detail an alternate pathway for hydrogen atom transfer to {pi}-systems, radical hydrogen transfer (RHT). RHT is the direct, bimolecular transfer of hydrogen from the {beta}-position of an organic radical to the target {pi}-system. In the initial theoretical study, they examined the reaction ethyl radical + ethylene = ethylene + ethyl at the spin-projected UMP2/6-31G** level of theory. Recently, they have used a calibrated ROHF-MNDO-PM3 method to predict thermoneutral RHT barriers for hydrogen transfer between hydroaryl radicals and the corresponding arene. Because of the inherent limitations of semiempirical methods such as ROHF-MNDO-PM3, they have extended the initial work with the ethyl + ethylene study to examine this reaction at the ROHF-MBPT[2]-6-31G** and ROHF-CCSD[T]-6-31G** levels of ab initio theory. The primary objective was to determine how intrinsic RHT barriers change with conjugative stabilization of the radicals. The spin-restricted ROHF approach has been applied to study several RHT reactions, and they present completed ROHF results for the ethyl + ethylene system and preliminary results for the methallyl + butadiene system. The methallyl + butadiene system serves as a model for highly stabilized hydroaryl radicals: the methallyl radical exhibits a C-H bond strength of 46.5 kcal/mol compared to 9-hydroanthracenyl, 43.1 kcal/mol.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Franz, J.A.; Autrey, T.; Camaioni, D.M.; Watts, J.D. & Bartlett, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Applied research and evaluation of process concepts for liquefaction and gasification of western coals. Final report

Description: Fourteen sections, including five subsections, of the final report covering work done between June 1, 1975 to July 31, 1980 on research programs in coal gasification and liquefaction have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)
Date: September 1, 1980
Creator: Wiser, W. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemistry and morphology of coal liquefaction. Annual report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

Description: The present annual report summarizes quarterly reports and includes work performed during the last quarter of fiscal 1980. The first year of this project has just been completed and much of the time and effort has been concentrated on equipment building, assembling, testing, and on staffing. This, of course, has been more true in the areas of work with spectroscopic and high pressure equipment than in organic chemical reactions. More experimental results are therefore reported in the areas of hydrogen transfer mechanisms and catalysis and organo-metallic chemistry. A few of the significant results in these and other areas are the evidence for catalysis in hydrogen transfer from tetralin; a novel and possibly very important new synthesis of alkyl aromatics from benzene, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen; the study of coals in the transmission electron microscope identifying coal macerals, minerals and metals, and leading to the possibility of observing location of and catalytic influences on pyrolysis and hydrogenation at elevated temperatures; the finding that scales formed on deactivated cobalt-molybdena-alumina-hydrogenation catalysts contain not only metals from the liquid feedstocks, but also molybdenum sulfide which must derive from migration from the catalyst interior to and beyond the surface. Insights gained in mechanisms of pyrolysis, hydrogenation, hydrogen transfer, and indirect liquefaction of coal promise to lead to improving technology by defining problem areas and showing routes to by-pass problems.
Date: September 1, 1980
Creator: Heinemann, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hydrogen shutting pathways in thermal hydroliquefaction: Solvent-induced scission of coal model compound structures

Description: It has been demonstrated that donor solvents play a key role in the scission of thermal stable bonds in coal model compounds and therefore it has been speculated that they will improve liquefaction efficiencies. The authors have been studying the transfer of hydrogen from dihydroarene donor solvents to arene model compounds to quantify the barriers of competing hydrogen transfer mechanisms. Hydrogen can be transferred between arene rings by a variety of pathways. The specific hydrogen transfer pathway or pathways can be predicted given an understanding of the thermochemistry of the reactants intermediates and products. The individual pathways that contribute to strong bond scission have been shown to be dependent on the dihydroarene donor and the arene acceptor. In this paper they quantify the hydrogen pathways between the solvent components anthracene and phenanthrene. In addition, they describe reaction conditions requiring consideration of an additional hydrogen transfer pathway: a multi-step nonipso hydrogen transfer to coal model compounds to evaluate the hydrogen transfer steps to cleave strong diarylmethane bonds in coal structures.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Autrey, S.T.; Powers, T.; Alborn, E.A.; Camaioni, D.M. & Franz, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Low severity coal liquefaction promoted by cyclic olefins. Quarterly report, January--March 1995

Description: The research performed during the quarter, January to March 1995, focused on two areas. The first area involved completing the writing of a manuscript based on research performed on this project concerning the mild acidic pretreatment of low rank coals and their liquefaction behavior in the presence of hydrogen donors with different reactivities. The manuscript was submitted for review to Energy and Fuels. A second manuscript was begun which discussed the research involving the hydrogen donation at low severity condition by hexahydroanthracene. The catalytic enhancement of hydrogen transfer by cyclic olefins was also examined. The data from this research was reexamined; it was decided that before writing the paper than the data should be reanalyzed. Therefore, this quarter was spent taking the raw data and reanalyzing the data, putting the solvent fractionation data on a solvent-free basis. The recalculated data and the calculational method is given as Part 1 in this report. The second area that was worked on this quarter was the high temperature infrared analysis of cyclic olefins. The work is ongoing and is currently involving a considerable amount of equipment and technique development. Part 2 is the discussion on the high temperature infrared analysis of cyclic olefins.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Curtis, C.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of the radical hydrogen transfer pathway for cleaving strong bonds in coal

Description: Hydrogen transfer processes involving radical intermediates are of key importance in the liquefaction of coal. While the primary function of donor solvents is to transfer H{lg_bullet} to coal-derived radicals that form when weak bonds are cleaved thermolytically, growing evidence suggests that the donor solvent can play a role in promoting cleavage of strong {alpha}-bonds. McMillen and Malhotra have explained the results in terms of a single-step mechanism referred to as radical H-transfer (RHT). Mechanistic kinetic models have been used to suggest the importance of RHT pathways in anthracene- and pyrene-based solvent systems. However, we question the reliability of these approaches because little experimental data exists to support the 16.5 kcal/mol intrinsic barriers they assume for RHT reactions. Unambiguous evidence for RHT is very difficult to obtain experimentally because at the temperatures required to activate the RHT reaction, a suite of multistep reactions can occur, which yield the same products, i.e. H-elimination from hydroaryl radicals followed by ipso addition. For this reason, we have sought to gain insight to barrier heights for RHT from theory. This paper reports our use of Marcus theory in combination with ab initio and semiempirical molecular orbital methods to show how the intrinsic barriers for RHT reactions depend on structural and thermodynamic properties of the reacting partners. In addition, reactions thought to be mediated by RHT are reexamined using mechanistic kinetic modeling (MKM) to determine the extent to which these reactions can be explained by conventional pathways.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Autrey, S. T.; Camaioni, D. M.; Ferris, K. F. & Franz, J. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Restricted mass transport effects on free radical reactions

Description: Coal possesses a complex chemical and physical structure. The cross-linked, network structure can lead to alterations in normal thermally-induced, free-radical decay pathways as a consequence of restrictions on mass transport. Moreover, in coal liquefaction, access of an external hydrogen donor to a reactive radical site can be hindered by the substantial domains of microporosity present in coals. However, previous work indicates that diffusion effects do not appear to be playing an important role in this coal conversion chemistry. Several possible explanations for this phenomenon were advanced including the potential involvement of a hydrogen hopping/radical relay mechanism recently discovered model systems in the authors laboratories. The authors have employed silica-anchored compounds to explore the effects of restricted mass transport on the pyrolysis mechanisms of coal model compounds. In studies of two-component systems, cases have been discovered where radical centers can be rapidly relocated in the diffusionally constrained environment as a consequence of rapid serial hydrogen atom transfers. This chemistry can have substantial effects on thermal decomposition rates and on product selectivities. In this study, the authors examine additional surfaces to systematically investigate the impact of molecular structure on the hydrogen atom transfer promoted radical relay mechanism. Silica-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane ({approx}Ph(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}Ph, or {approx}DPP) was chosen as the thermally reactive component, since it can be considered prototypical of linkages in coal that do not contain weak bonds easily cleaved at coal liquefaction temperatures (ca. 4000 {degrees}C), but which crack at reasonable rates if benzylic radicals can be generated by hydrogen abstraction. The rate of such hydrogen transfers under restricted diffusion will be highly dependent on the structure and proximity of neighboring molecules.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Buchanan, A. C. III; Britt, P. F. & Thomas, K. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department