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Availability of Legislative Measures in the House of Representatives (The "Three-Day Rule")

Description: This report discuses rules in the House of Representatives governing the length of time legislative measures must be available to Members before being considered on the floor. Generally most measures are required to be available for three calendar days excluding weekends and holidays unless the House is in session on those days. The House has several means by which it can choose to waive these availability requirements and call up, debate, and vote on a measure in a single calendar day, even if the text of the measure was not made available prior to consideration. These include adopting a special rule that waives the three-day requirement; adopting a special rule that waives the one-day requirement for another special rule; and convening a second legislative day on the same calendar day.
Date: June 12, 2017
Creator: Rybicki, Elizabeth
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The House's Corrections Calendar

Description: This report discusses the establishment of the “Corrections Day”, a concept credited to Michigan Governor John Englerwhich, which is a procedure for repealing “the dumbest things the federal government is currently doing and just abolish them.”
Date: March 28, 2001
Creator: Oleszek, Walter J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Discharge Rule in the House: Principal Features and Uses

Description: The “discharge rule” of the House of Representatives allows a measure to come to the floor for consideration, even if the committee of referral does not report it and the leadership does not schedule it. To initiate this action, a majority of House Members must first sign a petition for that purpose. The rule permits either (1) the committee of referral to be discharged from the measure itself; or (2) the Committee on Rules to be discharged from a special rule for considering the measure. Layover periods required by the rule permit the Committee on Rules to preempt a discharge attempt, and recover control of the floor agenda, by securing adoption of an alternative special rule for considering the measure.
Date: March 26, 2001
Creator: Beth, Richard S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Discharge Rule in the House: Recent Use in Historical Context

Description: The discharge rule of the House of Representatives affords a way for Members to bring to the floor a measure not reported from committee. Before a motion to discharge may be made, 218 Members must sign a petition for that purpose. This report provides summary data on discharge petitions filed since adoption of the present form of discharge rule in 1931. It also identifies the 32 occasions since 1967 on which a committee report or floor action occurred on a measure against which a petition was filed (or an alternative measure on the same subject).
Date: August 6, 2001
Creator: Beth, Richard S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Discharge Rule in the House: Recent Use in Historical Context

Description: The discharge rule of the House of Representatives affords a way for Members to bring to the floor a measure not reported from committee. Before a motion to discharge may be made, 218 Members must sign a petition for that purpose. This report provides summary data on discharge petitions filed since adoption of the present form of discharge rule in 1931. It also identifies the 32 occasions since 1967 on which a committee report or floor action occurred on a measure against which a petition was filed (or an alternative measure on the same subject).
Date: April 17, 2003
Creator: Beth, Richard S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Commonly Used Motions and Requests in the House of Representatives

Description: This report identifies the most commonly used motions and requests available to Members during proceedings in the House of Representatives. The report divides the motions and requests into seven broad categories, based on when the motion or request is in order and who can make the motion or request. Daily Business is the category that includes items that are routine to the conduct of business in the House each day, such as the motion to adjourn. Decorum and Privilege covers issues of the rights and privileges of Members and the House and how Members conduct themselves on the floor.
Date: November 30, 2004
Creator: Palmer, Betsy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Decorum in House Debate

Description: The basic standards of decorum that govern remarks made in the House of Representatives are described in this report. The report also discusses the procedure for "words taken down" and other mechanisms used in the House for enforcing these standards. The standards and mechanisms covered here include those set forth in House rules, related sections of Jefferson's Manual, published precedents, and supplementary policy statements by the Speaker. Also provided are examples from the 103rd-105th Congress of words spoken in House floor debate that led to one or more enforcement mechanisms being invoked.
Date: October 26, 1999
Creator: Mulvihill, Mary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department