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Cybersecurity Issues and Challenges

Description: This report provides information about Cybersecurity Issues and Challenges. People who perform cyberattacks generally fall into various categories like criminals, spies, nation-state warriors, terrorists, etc.
Date: January 21, 2015
Creator: Fischer, Eric A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Cybersecurity Issues and Challenges

Description: This report provides information about Cybersecurity Issues and Challenges. People who perform cyberattacks generally fall into various categories like criminals, spies, nation-state warriors, terrorists, etc.
Date: November 6, 2014
Creator: Fischer, Eric A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Data Mining and Homeland Security: An Overview

Description: This report provides information about the Data Mining and Homeland Security. Data mining has become one of the key features of the homeland security initiatives. Data mining can be a potential means to identify terrorist activities such as money transfer etc.
Date: July 19, 2007
Creator: Seifert, Jeffrey W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Data Mining and Homeland Security: An Overview

Description: This report provides information about the Data Mining and Homeland Security. Data mining has become one of the key features of the homeland security initiatives. Data mining can be a potential means to identify terrorist activities such as money transfer etc.
Date: April 3, 2008
Creator: Seifert, Jeffrey W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Data Mining and Homeland Security: An Overview

Description: This report provides information about the Data Mining and Homeland Security. Data mining has become one of the key features of the homeland security initiatives. Data mining can be a potential means to identify terrorist activities such as money transfer etc.
Date: December 5, 2007
Creator: Seifert, Jeffrey W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Department of Homeland Security Grants to State and Local Governments: FY2003 to FY2006

Description: This report provides information about the Department of Homeland Security Grants to State and Local Governments in between FY2003 to FY2006. This report also analyzes federal grants to state and local governments that are administered by DHS.
Date: October 12, 2007
Creator: Maguire, Steven & Reese, Shawn
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Department of Homeland Security Grants to State and Local Governments: FY2003 to FY2006

Description: This report provides information about the Department of Homeland Security Grants to State and Local Governments in between FY2003 to FY2006. This report also analyzes federal grants to state and local governments that are administered by DHS.
Date: January 19, 2007
Creator: Maguire, Steven & Reese, Shawn
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Department of Homeland Security Grants to State and Local Governments: FY2003 to FY2006

Description: This report provides information about the Department of Homeland Security Grants to State and Local Governments in between FY2003 to FY2006. This report also analyzes federal grants to state and local governments that are administered by DHS.
Date: March 12, 2007
Creator: Maguire, Steven & Reese, Shawn
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Fiscal Year 2005 Homeland Security Grant Program: State Allocations and Issues for Congressional Oversight

Description: The Office for Domestic Preparedness, within the Department of Homeland Security, is responsible for directing and supervising federal terrorism preparedness grants for states and localities. Prior to FY2005, the Office for Domestic Preparedness offered that assistance through six separate grant programs. Some state and local officials, however, criticized the fragmentation of homeland security assistance and recommended streamlining the grant process. Subsequently, the Office for Domestic Preparedness recommended and — pursuant to Section 872 of the Homeland Security Act (P.L. 107-296), which authorizes the Department of Homeland Security Secretary “to allocate, reallocate, and consolidate functions and organization units within the Department” — former Department of Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge approved consolidating the separate programs into a single Homeland Security Grant Program. Within the consolidated program, however, the six types of assistance continue to have their separate identities and funding allocations as “sub-grants.” As a whole, the Homeland Security Grant The program provides assistance for a wide range of eligible activities, among which are planning, training, equipment acquisition, and exercises. To fund the program, Congress appropriated approximately $2.5 billion for FY2005, roughly $600,000 less than for the programs in FY2004.
Date: April 21, 2005
Creator: Reese, Shawn
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Department of Homeland Security: Progress Made and Work Remaining in Implementing Homeland Security Missions 10 Years after 9/11

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, led to profound changes in government agendas, policies and structures to confront homeland security threats facing the nation. Most notably, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) began operations in 2003 with key missions that included preventing terrorist attacks from occurring in the United States, reducing the country's vulnerability to terrorism, and minimizing the damages from any attacks that may occur. DHS is now the third-largest federal department, with more than 200,000 employees and an annual budget of more than $50 billion. Since 2003, GAO has issued over 1,000 products on DHS's operations in such areas as transportation security and emergency management, among others. As requested, this testimony addresses DHS's progress and challenges in implementing its homeland security missions since it began operations, and issues affecting implementation efforts. This testimony is based on a report GAO issued in September 2011, which assessed DHS's progress in implementing its homeland security functions and work remaining."
Date: September 8, 2011
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Department of Homeland Security: A Comprehensive Strategy Is Still Needed to Achieve Management Integration Departmentwide

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Significant management challenges exist for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) as it continues to integrate its varied management processes, policies, and systems in areas such as financial management and information technology. These activities are primarily led by the Under Secretary for Management (USM), department management chiefs, and management chiefs in DHS's seven components. This testimony summarizes a new GAO report (GAO-10-131) that examined (1) the extent to which DHS has developed a comprehensive strategy for management integration that includes the characteristics recommended in GAO's earlier 2005 report, (2) how DHS is implementing management integration, and (3) the extent to which the USM is holding the department and component management chiefs accountable for implementing management integration through reporting relationships. GAO reviewed DHS plans and interviewed DHS management officials."
Date: December 15, 2009
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Department of Homeland Security: Efforts to Assess Realignment of Its Field Office Structure

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "DHS reported taking some steps to assess the realignment of its regional/field office structure. Since submitting an initial plan to Congress in 2004 that outlined regionalization, consolidation, and colocation opportunities, DHS officials said the agency considered the potential implementation of a unified regional field office structure through two major initiatives--the 2004 I-Staff review and the department's 2010 BUR. However, the I-Staff Regional Concept of Operations was not finalized or adopted, and in April 2012 a senior DHS official involved in the BUR effort stated that DHS no longer intends to implement the BUR recommendation related to regionalization because it is no longer the department's preferred approach. DHS had limited or no documentation related to either of these reviews, including the resulting key decisions from the efforts. As a result, we are unable to determine the extent to which DHS has fully considered the realignment of its regional/field office structure, including costs and benefits, since 2004. Standards for Internal Control in the Federal Government calls for clear documentation of significant events, which include assumptions and methods surrounding key decisions, and the standards also state that this documentation should be readily available for examination. DHS officials acknowledged the lack of documentation and plan to better document any future realignment efforts. DHS and component officials stated that operational and current budgetary constraints were key challenges to establishing a single DHS regional/field office structure, but they are exploring smaller-scale alternatives."
Date: September 28, 2012
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Homeland Security Grants: Observations on Process DHS Used to Allocate Funds to Selected Urban Areas

Description: Correspondence issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "In fiscal year 2006, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) provided approximately $1.7 billion in federal funding to states, localities, and territories through its Homeland Security Grant Program (HSGP) to prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from acts of terrorism or other catastrophic events. The Urban Areas Security Initiative (UASI) is a discretionary grant under this program, and since fiscal year 2003, Congress has directed DHS to target UASI funding to high-threat, high-density urban areas to assist in building capacity. To meet this requirement and inform funding decisions, DHS developed a method to estimate the relative risk of terrorist attacks to urban areas. From fiscal year 2003 through 2005, DHS used a number of risk indicators such as population density and threat to allocate UASI funds. UASI funding increased during this period from about $96 million to $830 million, while the number of urban areas that received grants grew from 7 to 43. In fiscal year 2006, DHS awarded approximately $711 million in UASI grants--a 14 percent reduction in funds from the previous year--while the number of eligible urban areas identified by the risk assessment decreased to 35. For fiscal year 2006, DHS made several changes to the grant allocation process, including modifying its risk assessment methodology, introducing an assessment of the anticipated effectiveness of investments, and combining the outcomes of these two assessments to inform funding decisions. The results of the UASI eligibility and funding allocations in fiscal year 2006 raised congressional questions and concerns about DHS's methods in making UASI determinations. Several congressional members requested that we examine aspects of DHS's UASI funding process, and the fiscal year 2007 DHS Appropriations Act directed us to examine the validity, relevance, reliability, timeliness, and availability of the …
Date: February 7, 2007
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Department of Homeland Security: Continued Progress Made Improving and Integrating Management Areas, but More Work Remains

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has updated and strengthened its strategy for how it plans to address GAO’s high-risk designation and resolve the department’s management challenges. In January 2011, DHS provided GAO with its Integrated Strategy for High Risk Management, which summarized the department’s preliminary plans for addressing the high-risk area. GAO found that this strategy, which was later updated in June and December 2011, was generally responsive to the actions and outcomes needed to address GAO’s high-risk designation. For example, the January 2011 strategy generally identified multiple, specific actions and target completion time frames consistent with the outcomes GAO identified. However, the strategy did not address the root causes of problems, among other things. In its June 2011 strategy, DHS, among other things, identified 10 root causes that cut across the management areas and their integration. GAO identified ways the strategy could be strengthened, including consistently reporting the progress of its initiatives and corrective actions. In its most recent update, DHS better positioned itself to address its management challenges. For example, for the first time, DHS included ratings of the department’s progress addressing its high-risk outcomes. However, GAO believes that DHS could more consistently report on available resources and corrective actions, establish measures and report on progress made for all initiatives, and stabilize its methodology for measuring progress. These changes, if implemented and sustained, provide a path for DHS to address GAO’s high-risk designation."
Date: March 1, 2012
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Department of Homeland Security: Continued Progress Made Improving and Integrating Management Areas, but More Work Remains

Description: Testimony issued by the Government Accountability Office with an abstract that begins "Since we designated the implementation and transformation of DHS as high risk in 2003, DHS has made progress addressing management challenges and senior department officials have demonstrated commitment and top leadership support for addressing the department's management challenges. However, the department has significant work ahead to achieve positive outcomes in resolving high-risk issues. For example, DHS faces challenges in modernizing its financial systems, implementing acquisition management controls, and improving employee satisfaction survey results, among other things. As DHS continues to mature as an organization, it will be important for the department to continue to strengthen its management functions, since the effectiveness of these functions affects its ability to fulfill its homeland security and other missions."
Date: September 20, 2012
Creator: United States. Government Accountability Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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