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The Cotton Bollworm: Some Observations and Results of Field Experiments in 1904

Description: Report discussing the cotton bollworm, which is very destructive to the cotton plant, especially in the Southwestern states in the Cotton Belt of the United States. Contains reports on fieldwork conducted at two stations in Texas and a discussion of effective and ineffective methods of control.
Date: 1905
Creator: Quaintance, A. L. (Altus Lacy), 1870-1958 & Bishopp, F. C. (Fred Corry), 1884-1970
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Corn Earworm As an Enemy of Vetch

Description: "Vetch, which has become an important forage crop throughout the Southeastern States, needs protection from the same insect that works such havoc on corn and cotton. This corn earworm, or cotton bollworm, is the most serious pest that growers of vetch have to combat. The caterpillars eat both the foliage and the seed pods, and, if the infestation is heavy, make the crop practically worthless. Vetch intended for a hay crop generally escapes serious injury, as it is cut before the caterpillars are large enough to do much damage. It is recommended that a crop intended for seed be carefully watched and if the insects become numerous an insecticide be applied at once or the vetch cut for hay. Spraying, dusting, the use of poisoned-bran bait, and other control measures are discussed and summarized in this bulletin." -- p. 2
Date: 1921
Creator: Luginbill, Philip & Beyer, A. H. (Adolph Harvey), b. 1882
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

How to Reduce Weevil Waste in Southern Corn

Description: "In weevil-infested regions ears with poor shuck coverings are damaged before the corn can be stored. To store corn with short, loose shucks results in greatly increased loss. Shucks that extend beyond the tips of the ears and close tightly about the silks are weevil proof both in the field and in storage. Feed or sell the unprotected ears as rapidly as possible. Store the weevil-proof ears in the their shucks. Select the best ears, in the field if possible, for next year's seed. Be sure that these ears have long, tight shucks, so that your next crop will have better shuck protection. If necessary to store corn that does not have good shuck protection, the damage will be reduced if the corn is shucked, shelled, cleaned, and put in bags of close-woven cloth. A slatted crib lined with galvanized-wire netting have 1/4-inch meshes is ideal for the storage of the bags of grain, because it gives good ventilation and excludes rats and mice." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Kyle, C. H. (Curtis Hernon), b. 1878
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Cotton Bollworm: An Account of the insect, With Results of Experiments in 1903

Description: Report describing the cotton bollworm, an enemy of the cotton plant, especially in Texas, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana. Discussion includes the bollworm's consequences for both cotton and corn as well as effective and ineffective methods of controlling it.
Date: 1904
Creator: Quaintance, A. L. (Altus Lacy), 1870-1958
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The tobacco budworm and its control.

Description: Describes the characteristics of the tobacco budworm, the damage it causes, and methods of control.
Date: July 1953
Creator: United States. Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine. Division of Truck Crop and Garden Insect Investigations.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department