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EPA v5.15 Base Case Documentation Supplement to Support EPA's Clean Power Plan

Description: A report that includes details on several modeling assumptions used as part of EPA's analysis of the Clean Power Plan using the EPA v5.15 Base Case using Integrated Planning Model (IPM). Modification include enhancing existing coal steam-fired units to adopt improvements to their heat rates.
Date: unknown
Creator: United States. Environmental Protection Agency.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced thermometrics for fossil power plant process improvement

Description: Improved temperature measurements in fossil power plants can reduce heat rate and uncertainties in power production efficiencies, extend the life of plant components, reduce maintenance costs, and lessen emissions. Conventional instruments for measurement of combustion temperatures, steam temperatures, and structural component temperatures can be improved by better specification, in situ calibration, signal processing, and performance monitoring. Innovative instruments can enhance, augment, or replace conventional instruments. Several critical temperatures can be accessed using new methods that were impossible with conventional instruments. Such instruments include high temperature resistance temperature detectors (RTDs), thermometric phosphors, inductive thermometry, and ultrasonic thermometry.
Date: April 30, 1996
Creator: Shepard, R.L.; Weiss, J.M. & Holcomb, D.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THE CONCEPTUAL DESIGN ASSESSMENT FOR THE CO-FIRING OF BIO-REFINERY SUPPLIED LIGNIN PROJECT

Description: The major aspects of this project are proceeding toward completion. Prior to this quarter, design criteria, tentative site selection, facility layout, and preliminary facility cost estimates were completed and issued. Processing of bio-solids was completed, providing material for the pilot operations. Pilot facility design, equipment selection, and modification were completed during the fourth quarter of 2000. Initial pilot facility shakedown was completed during the fourth quarter. After some unavoidable delays, a suitable representative supply of MSW feed material was procured. During this first quarter of 2001, shredding of the feed material and final feed conditioning were completed. Pilot facility hydrolysis production was completed to produce lignin for co-fire testing. During this quarter, TVA completed the washing and dewatering of the lignin material produced from the MSW hydrolysis. Seven drums of lignin material were washed to recover the acid and sugar from the lignin and provide an improved fuel for steam generation. Samples of both the lignin and bio-solids fuel materials for co-fire testing were sent to the co-fire facility (EERC) for evaluation. After sample evaluation, EERC approved sending the material and all of the necessary fuel for testing was shipped to EERC. EERC has requested and will receive coal typical of the fuel to the TVA-Colbert boilers. This material will be used at EERC as baseline material and for mixing with the bio-fuel for combustion testing. EERC combustion testing of the bio based fuels is scheduled to begin in August of 2001. The TVA-Colbert facility has neared completion of the task to evaluate the co-location of the Masada facility on the operation of the power generation facility. The TVA-Colbert fossil plant is fully capable of providing a reliable steam supply. The preferred steam supply connection points and steam pipeline routing have been identified. The environmental review of the pipeline routing ...
Date: July 1, 2001
Creator: Berglund, Ted; Ranney, Jeffrey T.; Babb, Carol L. & Broder, Jacqueline G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN ASSESSMENT FOR THE CO-FIRING OF BIO-REFINERY SUPPLIED LIGNIN PROJECT

Description: The major aspects of this project are proceeding toward completion. Prior to this quarter, design criteria, tentative site selection, facility layout, and preliminary facility cost estimates were completed and issued. Processing of bio-solids was completed, providing material for the pilot operations. Pilot facility hydrolysis production has been completed to produce lignin for co-fire testing and the lignin fuel was washed and dewatered. Both the lignin and bio-solids fuel materials for co-fire testing were sent to the co-fire facility (EERC) for evaluation and co-firing. EERC has received coal typical of the fuel to the TVA-Colbert boilers. This material was used at EERC as baseline material and for mixing with the bio-fuel for combustion testing. All the combustion and fuel handling tests at EERC have been completed. During fuel preparation EERC reported no difficulties in fuel blending and handling. Preliminary co-fire test results indicate that the blending of lignin and bio-solids with the Colbert coal blend generally reduces NO{sub x} emissions, increases the reactivity of the coal, and increases the ash deposition rate on superheater surfaces. Deposits produced from the fuel blends, however, are more friable and hence easier to remove from tube surfaces relative to those produced from the baseline Colbert coal blend. The final co-fire testing report is being prepared at EERC and will be completed by the end of the second quarter of 2002. The TVA-Colbert facility has neared completion of the task to evaluate co-location of the Masada facility on the operation of the power generation facility. The TVA-Colbert fossil plant is fully capable of providing a reliable steam supply. The preferred steam supply connection points and steam pipeline routing have been identified. The environmental review of the pipeline routing has been completed and no major impacts have been identified. Detailed assessment of steam export impacts on the ...
Date: April 1, 2002
Creator: Berglund, Ted; Ranney, Jeffrey T.; Babb, Carol L. & Broder, Jacqueline G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PG and E Geysers Retrofit Project: Milestone Report No. 1

Description: Rogers Engineering was contracted to determine the technical feasibility and cost/benefit ratios for Pacific Gas and Electric Company to replace the iron-catalyst/peroxide/ caustic systems with surface condensers and Stretford H{sub 2}S abatement systems for Units 1 through 12 at the Geysers. This Milestone No.1 Report is a 6 week progress report and will not have the cost benefit analyses which is planned for in the Final Report. This report will focus only on Units 1 and-3, which are thought of as typical to Units 2 and 4 in our contract. The work performed analyzes the cooling water cycle for both units and determines the turbine operating back pressure as a function of cold water from the existing cooling towers to the new surface condensers. Any power penalty is noted and assessed to the respective turbine-generator with necessary definition for the reason in heat rate deterioration. The direction of Rogers Engineering Co.'s efforts was the conceptual system analysis for Units 1 and 3. But cooling tower performance differences between Units 1 and 2 influenced the similarity of, the cycle thermodynamics and power output at the generator for these two units. We therefore are reporting on Units One and Two. Units Three and Four are identical with some minor location and piping.
Date: June 4, 1979
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

Description: This is the eighth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. Analyses were performed to determine the effects of coal product moisture on unit performance. Results are given showing how the coal product moisture level affects parameters such as boiler efficiency, power required to drive the fluidizing air fan, other station service power needed for fans and pulverizers, net unit heat rate, thermal energy rejected by the cooling tower, and stack emissions.
Date: March 1, 2005
Creator: Sarunac, Nenad & Levy, Edward
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN ASSESSMENT FOR THE CO-FIRING OF BIO-REFINERY SUPPLIED LIGNIN PROJECT

Description: The major aspects of this project are proceeding toward completion. Prior to this quarter, design criteria, tentative site selection, facility layout, and preliminary facility cost estimates were completed and issued. Processing of bio-solids was completed, providing material for the pilot operations. Pilot facility design, equipment selection, and modification were completed during the fourth quarter of 2000. Initial pilot facility shakedown was completed. After some unavoidable delays, a suitable representative supply of MSW feed material was procured. During this first quarter of 2001, shredding of the feed material and final feed conditioning were completed. Pilot facility hydrolysis production was completed to produce lignin for co-fire testing and the lignin fuel was washed and dewatered. Both the lignin and bio-solids fuel materials for co-fire testing were sent to the co-fire facility (EERC) for evaluation and co-firing. EERC has received coal typical of the fuel to the TVA-Colbert boilers. This material will be used at EERC as baseline material and for mixing with the bio-fuel for combustion testing. EERC combustion testing of the bio-based fuels is scheduled to begin in October of 2001. The TVA-Colbert facility has neared completion of the task to evaluate co-location of the Masada facility on the operation of the power generation facility. The TVA-Colbert fossil plant is fully capable of providing a reliable steam supply. The preferred steam supply connection points and steam pipeline routing have been identified. The environmental review of the pipeline routing has been completed and no major impacts have been identified. Detailed assessment of steam export impacts on the Colbert boiler system have been completed and a cost estimate for steam supply system was completed. The cost estimate and the output and heat rate impacts will be used to determine a preliminary price for the exported steam.
Date: October 1, 2001
Creator: Berglund, Ted; Ranney, Jeffrey T.; Babb, Carol L. & Broder, Jacqueline G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of Heating Rate on the Thermodynamic Properties of Pulverized Coal

Description: This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed under DOE Grant No.DE-FG22-96PC96224 during the period September 24, 1997 to April 23, 1998 which covers the third six months of the project. During this reporting period, several components of the electrodynamic balance measurement system, Single Particle Laboratory, Federal Energy Technology center, Morgantown, WV, were successfully calibrated. A large number of single polystyrenespheres covering a size range of 80 - 200 microns in diameter were caught in the electrodynamic balance. The size counts of their projected images obtained using the top video-based imaging system, bottom video-based imaging system, and diode-array imaging system were calibrated against the actual size of the particles to within ± 3 microns. Signals obtained by the particle position control system were also calibrated against the actual movement of a polystyrene particle in the balance to within ± 1 microns. Presently, calibration of the Single Color Pyrometer to measure coal particle temperature histories is in progress. Donation agreement for the Heated-Grid measurement system from our industrial partner, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), CT, was obtained and the arrangement for the completion of the shipment of the grid system components from UTRC to CAU is in progress. Several theoretical analyses were conducted to improve the model performance of the present work and the results were compared with data available from our previous studies. These activities resulted in several publications including three conference papers, and one student poster paper during this reporting period.
Date: May 1, 1998
Creator: Sampath, Ramanathan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactivity of young chars via energetic distribution measurements. Quarterly technical progress report, 15 March 1992--30 June 1992

Description: The correlation and prediction of kinetic rates and mechanisms of the reactions of gas phase species with coal chars represent a difficult undertaking under the best of circumstances. Solid phase heterogeneity and impurities, complex pore structure, transport limitation, and evolution of active surface represent just a few of the well known problems. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) has become a standard technique for investigating the physics-chemical state of adsorbed species on surfaces. The TPD spectra usually consist of one or more peaks. The shapes of the peaks and the position of the peak maxima with respect to temperature are related in a fundamental manner to the desorption process, and, therefore, provide basic information regarding the energetics of the desorbed species. The current project is directed at developing related techniques for the characterization and prediction/correlation of the reactivity of ``young`` chars to steam and oxygen. Of particular interest is mapping of the reactivity behavior of the resultant chars, as revealed by the energetic heterogeneity of the complexes with char preparation conditions; i.e., heating rate and ultimate temperature. Progress is described.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Calo, J. M.; Zhang, L. H. & Lilly, W. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactivity of young chars via energetic distribution measurements. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 July 1992--30 September 1992

Description: The correlation and prediction of kinetic rates and mechanisms of the reactions of gas phase species with coal chars represent a difficult undertaking under the best of circumstances. Solid phase heterogeneity and impurities, complex pore structure, transport limitation, and evolution of active surface represent just a few of the well known problems. Temperature programming desorption (TPD) has become a standard technique or investigating the physics-chemical state of adsorbed species on surfaces. The TPD spectra usually consist of one or more peaks. The shapes of the peaks and the position of the peak maxima with respect to temperature are related in a fundamental manner to the desorption process, and therefore, provide basic information regarding the energetics of the desorbed species. The current project is directed at developing related techniques for the characterization and prediction/correlation of the reactivity of ``young`` chars to steam and oxygen. Of particular interest is mapping of the reactivity behavior of the resultant chars, as revealed by the energetic heterogeneity of the complexes with char preparation conditions; i.e., heating rate and ultimate temperature.
Date: December 31, 1992
Creator: Calo, J. M.; Zhang, L. H. & Lilly, W. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

Description: This is the ninth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, comparative analyses were performed for lignite and PRB coals to determine how unit performance varies with coal product moisture. Results are given showing how the coal product moisture level and coal rank affect parameters such as boiler efficiency, station service power needed for fans and pulverizers and net unit heat rate. Results are also given for the effects of coal drying on cooling tower makeup water and comparisons are made between makeup water savings for various times of the year.
Date: April 1, 2005
Creator: Levy, Edward; Sarunac, Nenad; Bilirgen, Harun & Zhang, Wei
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

Description: U.S. low rank coals contain relatively large amounts of moisture, with the moisture content of subbituminous coals typically ranging from 15 to 30 percent and that for lignites from 25 and 40 percent. High fuel moisture has several adverse impacts on the operation of a pulverized coal generating unit, for it can result in fuel handling problems and it affects heat rate, stack emissions and maintenance costs. Theoretical analyses and coal test burns performed at a lignite fired power plant show that by reducing the fuel moisture, it is possible to improve boiler performance and unit heat rate, reduce emissions and reduce water consumption by the evaporative cooling tower. The economic viability of the approach and the actual impact of the drying system on water consumption, unit heat rate and stack emissions will depend critically on the design and operating conditions of the drying system. The present project evaluated the low temperature drying of high moisture coals using power plant waste heat to provide the energy required for drying. Coal drying studies were performed in a laboratory scale fluidized bed dryer to gather data and develop models on drying kinetics. In addition, analyses were carried out to determine the relative costs and performance impacts (in terms of heat rate, cooling tower water consumption and emissions) of drying along with the development of optimized drying system designs and recommended operating conditions.
Date: March 1, 2006
Creator: Levy, Edward K.; Sarunac, Nenad; Bilirgen, Harun & Caram, Hugo
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tampa Electric Neural Network Sootblowing

Description: Boiler combustion dynamics change continuously due to several factors including coal quality, boiler loading, ambient conditions, changes in slag/soot deposits and the condition of plant equipment. NO{sub x} formation, Particulate Matter (PM) emissions, and boiler thermal performance are directly affected by the sootblowing practices on a unit. As part of its Power Plant Improvement Initiative program, the US DOE is providing cofunding (DE-FC26-02NT41425) and NETL is the managing agency for this project at Tampa Electric's Big Bend Station. This program serves to co-fund projects that have the potential to increase thermal efficiency and reduce emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. A review of the Big Bend units helped identify intelligent sootblowing as a suitable application to achieve the desired objectives. The existing sootblower control philosophy uses sequential schemes, whose frequency is either dictated by the control room operator or is timed based. The intent of this project is to implement a neural network based intelligent soot-blowing system, in conjunction with state-of-the-art controls and instrumentation, to optimize the operation of a utility boiler and systematically control boiler fouling. Utilizing unique, on-line, adaptive technology, operation of the sootblowers can be dynamically controlled based on real-time events and conditions within the boiler. This could be an extremely cost-effective technology, which has the ability to be readily and easily adapted to virtually any pulverized coal fired boiler. Through unique on-line adaptive technology, Neural Network-based systems optimize the boiler operation by accommodating equipment performance changes due to wear and maintenance activities, adjusting to fluctuations in fuel quality, and improving operating flexibility. The system dynamically adjusts combustion setpoints and bias settings in closed-loop supervisory control to simultaneously reduce NO{sub x} emissions and improve heat rate around the clock.
Date: December 31, 2003
Creator: Rhode, Mark A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tampa Electric Neural Network Sootblowing

Description: Boiler combustion dynamics change continuously due to several factors including coal quality, boiler loading, ambient conditions, changes in slag/soot deposits and the condition of plant equipment. NO{sub x} formation, Particulate Matter (PM) emissions, and boiler thermal performance are directly affected by the sootblowing practices on a unit. As part of its Power Plant Improvement Initiative program, the US DOE is providing cofunding (DE-FC26-02NT41425) and NETL is the managing agency for this project at Tampa Electric's Big Bend Station. This program serves to co-fund projects that have the potential to increase thermal efficiency and reduce emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. A review of the Big Bend units helped identify intelligent sootblowing as a suitable application to achieve the desired objectives. The existing sootblower control philosophy uses sequential schemes, whose frequency is either dictated by the control room operator or is timed based. The intent of this project is to implement a neural network based intelligent soot-blowing system, in conjunction with state-of-the-art controls and instrumentation, to optimize the operation of a utility boiler and systematically control boiler fouling. Utilizing unique, online, adaptive technology, operation of the sootblowers can be dynamically controlled based on real-time events and conditions within the boiler. This could be an extremely cost-effective technology, which has the ability to be readily and easily adapted to virtually any pulverized coal fired boiler. Through unique on-line adaptive technology, Neural Network-based systems optimize the boiler operation by accommodating equipment performance changes due to wear and maintenance activities, adjusting to fluctuations in fuel quality, and improving operating flexibility. The system dynamically adjusts combustion setpoints and bias settings in closed-loop supervisory control to simultaneously reduce {sub x} emissions and improve heat rate around the clock.
Date: September 30, 2002
Creator: Rhode, Mark A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tampa Electric Neural Network Sootblowing

Description: Boiler combustion dynamics change continuously due to several factors including coal quality, boiler loading, ambient conditions, changes in slag/soot deposits and the condition of plant equipment. NOx formation, Particulate Matter (PM) emissions, and boiler thermal performance are directly affected by the sootblowing practices on a unit. As part of its Power Plant Improvement Initiative program, the US DOE is providing co-funding (DE-FC26-02NT41425) and NETL is the managing agency for this project at Tampa Electric's Big Bend Station. This program serves to co-fund projects that have the potential to increase thermal efficiency and reduce emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. A review of the Big Bend units helped identify intelligent sootblowing as a suitable application to achieve the desired objectives. The existing sootblower control philosophy uses sequential schemes, whose frequency is either dictated by the control room operator or is timed based. The intent of this project is to implement a neural network based intelligent sootblowing system, in conjunction with state-of-the-art controls and instrumentation, to optimize the operation of a utility boiler and systematically control boiler fouling. Utilizing unique, on-line, adaptive technology, operation of the sootblowers can be dynamically controlled based on real-time events and conditions within the boiler. This could be an extremely cost-effective technology, which has the ability to be readily and easily adapted to virtually any pulverized coal fired boiler. Through unique on-line adaptive technology, Neural Network-based systems optimize the boiler operation by accommodating equipment performance changes due to wear and maintenance activities, adjusting to fluctuations in fuel quality, and improving operating flexibility. The system dynamically adjusts combustion setpoints and bias settings in closed-loop supervisory control to simultaneously reduce NO{sub x} emissions and improve heat rate around the clock.
Date: March 31, 2004
Creator: Rhode, Mark A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Tampa Electric Neural Network Sootblowing

Description: Boiler combustion dynamics change continuously due to several factors including coal quality, boiler loading, ambient conditions, changes in slag/soot deposits and the condition of plant equipment. NOx formation, Particulate Matter (PM) emissions, and boiler thermal performance are directly affected by the sootblowing practices on a unit. As part of its Power Plant Improvement Initiative program, the US DOE is providing cofunding (DE-FC26-02NT41425) and NETL is the managing agency for this project at Tampa Electric's Big Bend Station. This program serves to co-fund projects that have the potential to increase thermal efficiency and reduce emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. A review of the Big Bend units helped identify intelligent sootblowing as a suitable application to achieve the desired objectives. The existing sootblower control philosophy uses sequential schemes, whose frequency is either dictated by the control room operator or is timed based. The intent of this project is to implement a neural network based intelligent sootblowing system, in conjunction with state-of-the-art controls and instrumentation, to optimize the operation of a utility boiler and systematically control boiler fouling. Utilizing unique, on-line, adaptive technology, operation of the sootblowers can be dynamically controlled based on real-time events and conditions within the boiler. This could be an extremely cost-effective technology, which has the ability to be readily and easily adapted to virtually any pulverized coal fired boiler. Through unique on-line adaptive technology, Neural Network-based systems optimize the boiler operation by accommodating equipment performance changes due to wear and maintenance activities, adjusting to fluctuations in fuel quality, and improving operating flexibility. The system dynamically adjusts combustion setpoints and bias settings in closed-loop supervisory control to simultaneously reduce NO{sub x} emissions and improve heat rate around the clock.
Date: September 30, 2004
Creator: Rhode, Mark A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE

Description: This project has documented and demonstrated the feasibility of technologies and operational choices for companies who operate the large installed fleet of integral engine compressors in pipeline service. Continued operations of this fleet is required to meet the projected growth of the U.S. gas market. Applying project results will meet the goals of the DOE-NETL Natural Gas Infrastructure program to enhance integrity, extend life, improve efficiency, and increase capacity, while managing NOx emissions. These benefits will translate into lower cost, more reliable gas transmission, and options for increasing deliverability from the existing infrastructure on high demand days. The power cylinders on large bore slow-speed integral engine/compressors do not in general combust equally. Variations in cylinder pressure between power cylinders occur cycle-to-cycle. These variations affect both individual cylinder performance and unit average performance. The magnitude of the variations in power cylinder combustion is dependent on a variety of parameters, including air/fuel ratio. Large variations in cylinder performance and peak firing pressure can lead to detonation and misfires, both of which can be damaging to the unit. Reducing the variation in combustion pressure, and moving the high and low performing cylinders closer to the mean is the goal of engine balancing. The benefit of improving the state of the engine ''balance'' is a small reduction in heat rate and a significant reduction in both crankshaft strain and emissions. A new method invented during the course of this project is combustion pressure ratio (CPR) balancing. This method is more effective than current methods because it naturally accounts for differences in compression pressure, which results from cylinder-to-cylinder differences in the amount of air flowing through the inlet ports and trapped at port closure. It also helps avoid compensation for low compression pressure by the addition of excess fuel to achieve equalizing peak firing pressure, ...
Date: May 31, 2006
Creator: Smalley, Anthony J.; Harris, Ralph E.; Bourn, Gary D.; Phillips, Ford A. & Deffenbaugh, Danny M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Demontration of Integrated Optimization Software at the Baldwin Energy Complex

Description: This project encompassed the design, development, and demonstration of integrated online optimization systems at Dynegy Midwest Generation's Baldwin Energy Complex (BEC) located in Baldwin, Illinois. The overall project objective was to improve coal-based generation's emission profile, efficiency, maintenance requirements and plant asset life in order to enhance the long-term viability of the United States abundant coal resources. Five separate but integrated optimization products were developed, addressing combustion, sootblowing, SCR operations, overall unit thermal performance, and plant-wide availability optimization. Optimization results are inherently unit-specific and cannot be known for a particular generating unit in advance. However, NeuCo believed that the following were reasonable targets for the completed, integrated set of products: Furnace NOx reduction improvement by 5%, Heat rate improvement by 1.5%, Increase of annual Available MWh by 1.5%, Commensurate reductions in greenhouse gases, mercury, and particulates; and Commensurate increases in profitability from lower costs, improved reliability, and greater commercial availability. The goal during Phase I was to establish each system and demonstrate their integration in unified plant optimization. Efforts during Phase I focused on: (1) developing, deploying, integrating, and testing prototypes for each of the five products; (2) identifying and addressing issues required for the products to integrate with plant operations; and (3) systematically collecting and assimilating feedback to improve subsequent product releases. As described in the Phase II continuation application NeuCo successfully achieved the goal for Phase I. The goal of Phase II was to improve upon the products installed and tested in Phase I and to quantify the benefits of the integrated system. As this report documents, NeuCo has also successfully achieved the goal for Phase II. The overall results of the project, compared with the project goals, are: (1) NOx Reduction: The 5% target for NOx reduction was exceeded with average CEMS and SCR Inlet (furnace) NOx ...
Date: January 7, 2009
Creator: James, Rob; McDermott, John; Patnaik, Sanjay & Piche`, Steve
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration

Description: The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: {lg_bullet} System efficiency that will exceed 60%(lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. {lg_bullet} An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. {lg_bullet} Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. {lg_bullet} Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. {lg_bullet} Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. {lg_bullet} Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. {lg_bullet} Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III extension activities for a three month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this report. ...
Date: December 31, 2000
Creator: Westinghouse, Siemens
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration

Description: The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: (1) System efficiency that will exceed 60% (lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. (2) An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. (3) Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. (4) Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. (5) Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. (6) Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. (7) Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this ...
Date: September 30, 2001
Creator: Westinghouse, Siemens
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration

Description: The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: {lg_bullet} System efficiency that will exceed 60%(lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. {lg_bullet} An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. {lg_bullet} Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. {lg_bullet} Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. {lg_bullet} Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. {lg_bullet} Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. {lg_bullet} Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three-month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the period stated on the cover of this report. Background ...
Date: June 30, 2001
Creator: Westinghouse, Siemens
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Regenerative Heater Optimization for Steam Turbo-Generation Cycles of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants with a Comparison of Two Concepts for the Westinghouse International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS)

Description: The intent of this study is to discuss some of the many factors involved in the development of the design and layout of a steam turbo-generation unit as part of a modular Generation IV nuclear power plant. Of the many factors involved in the design and layout, this research will cover feed water system layout and optimization issues. The research is arranged in hopes that it can be generalized to any Generation IV system which uses a steam powered turbo-generation unit. The research is done using the ORCENT-II heat balance codes and the Salisbury methodology to be reviewed herein. The Salisbury methodology is used on an original cycle design by Famiani for the Westinghouse IRIS and the effects due to parameter variation are studied. The vital parameters of the Salisbury methodology are the incremental heater surface capital cost (S) in $/ft{sup 2}, the value of incremental power (I) in $/kW, and the overall heat transfer coefficient (U) in Btu/ft{sup 2}-degrees Fahrenheit-hr. Each is varied in order to determine the effects on the cycles overall heat rate, output, as well as, the heater surface areas. The effects of each are shown. Then the methodology is then used to compare the optimized original Famiani design consisting of seven regenerative feedwater heaters with an optimized new cycle concept, INRC8, containing four regenerative heaters. The results are shown. It can be seen that a trade between the complexity of the seven stage regenerative Famiani cycle and the simplicity of the INRC8 cycle can be made. It is desired that this methodology can be used to show the ability to evaluate modularity through the value of size a complexity of the system as well as the performance. It also shows the effectiveness of the Salisbury methodology in the optimization of regenerative cycles for such an ...
Date: August 1, 2002
Creator: Williams, W.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A comparative assessment of alternative combustion turbine inlet air cooling system

Description: Interest in combustion turbine inlet air cooling (CTAC) has increased during the last few years as electric utilities face increasing demand for peak power. Inlet air cooling increases the generating capacity and decreases the heat rate of a combustion turbine during hot weather when the demand for electricity is generally the greatest. Several CTAC systems have been installed, but the general applicability of the concept and the preference for specific concepts is still being debated. Concurrently, Rocky Research of Boulder City, Nevada has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to conduct research on complex compound (ammoniated salt) chiller systems for low-temperature refrigeration applications.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Brown, D.R.; Katipamula, S. & Konynenbelt, J.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A NOVEL CONCEPT FOR REDUCING WATER USAGE AND INCREASING EFFICIENCY IN POWER GENERATION

Description: The objective of the project is to apply a unique ice thermal storage (ITS) technology to cooling the intake air to gas turbines used for power generation. In Phase I, the work includes theoretical analysis, computer simulation, engineering design and cost evaluation of this novel ITS technology. The study includes two typical gas turbines (an industrial and an aeroderivative type gas turbine) operated at two different geographic locations: Phoenix, AZ and Houston, TX. Simulation runs are performed to generate data for both power output (KW) and heat rate (Btu/KWh) as well as water recovery (acre ft/yr) in terms of intake air temperature and humidity based on weather data and turbine performance curves. Preliminary engineering design of a typical equipment arrangement for turbine inlet air-cooling operation using the ITS system is presented. A cost analysis has been performed to demonstrate the market viability of the ITS technology. When the ITS technology is applied to gas turbines, a net power gain up to 40% and a heat rate reduction as much as 7% can be achieved. In addition, a significant amount of water can be recovered (up to 200 acre-ft of water per year for a 50 MW turbine). The total cost saving is estimated to be $500,000/yr for a 50 MW gas turbine generator. These results have clearly demonstrated that the use of ITS technology to cool the intake-air to gas turbines is an efficient and cost effective means to improve the overall performance of its power generation capacity with an important added benefit of water recovery in power plant operation. Thus, further development of ITS technology for commercial applications in power generation, particularly in coal-based IGCC power plants is warranted.
Date: March 1, 2004
Creator: Chiang, Shiao-Hung & Weismantel, Guy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department