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Analysis of Electric Energy Usage in Air Force Houses Equipped with Air-to-Air Heat Pumps

Description: From Introduction: "One part of this study, which is presented in this Monograph, consists of an analysis of electric energy usage and electric power demand data obtained from a sample group of occupied houses at Little Rock Air Force Base in Arkansas, equipped with heat pumps, water heaters, cooking ranges, clothes dryers, and miscellaneous appliances all operated by electricity."
Date: July 13, 1962
Creator: Archenbach, Paul R.; Davis, Joseph C. & Smith, William T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Research on Thermoelectric Heat Pumps

Description: From Results: "Prior to stating results achieved, let us first discuss the measurements we were able to make, and how these measurements might--or might not--be indicative of the objective we strove to reach. Tables I and II, and related Figs. 11 and 12, show the best results obtained. Final Columns of Tables I and II are believed to show, at least to a degree, how good or how poor our best sputtered films turned out to be, compared with top-quality Peliter semiconductor materials."
Date: November 1963
Creator: Cox, E. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ground Source Integrated Heat Pump (GS-IHP) Development

Description: Between October 2008 and May 2013 ORNL and ClimateMaster, Inc. (CM) engaged in a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to develop a groundsource integrated heat pump (GS-IHP) system for the US residential market. A initial prototype was designed and fabricated, lab-tested, and modeled in TRNSYS (SOLAR Energy Laboratory, et al, 2010) to predict annual performance relative to 1) a baseline suite of equipment meeting minimum efficiency standards in effect in 2006 (combination of air-source heat pump (ASHP) and resistance water heater) and 2) a state-of-the-art (SOA) two-capacity ground-source heat pump with desuperheater water heater (WH) option (GSHPwDS). Predicted total annual energy savings, while providing space conditioning and water heating for a 2600 ft{sup 2} (242 m{sup 2}) house at 5 U.S. locations, ranged from 52 to 59%, averaging 55%, relative to the minimum efficiency suite. Predicted energy use for water heating was reduced 68 to 78% relative to resistance WH. Predicted total annual savings for the GSHPwDS relative to the same baseline averaged 22.6% with water heating energy use reduced by 10 to 30% from desuperheater contributions. The 1st generation (or alpha) prototype design for the GS-IHP was finalized in 2010 and field test samples were fabricated for testing by CM and by ORNL. Two of the alpha units were installed in 3700 ft{sup 2} (345 m{sup 2}) houses at the ZEBRAlliance site in Oak Ridge and field tested during 2011. Based on the steady-state performance demonstrated by the GS-IHPs it was projected that it would achieve >52% energy savings relative to the minimum efficiency suite at this specific site. A number of operational issues with the alpha units were identified indicating design changes needed to the system before market introduction could be accomplished. These were communicated to CM throughout the field test period. Based on the alpha unit ...
Date: May 24, 2013
Creator: Baxter, V. D.; Rice, K.; Murphy, R.; Munk, J.; Ally, Moonis; Shen, Bo et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HYCSOS : A Chemical Heat Pump and Energy Conversion System Based on Metal Hydrides

Description: The current status of the HYCSOS chemical heat pump and energy conversion system based on metal hydrides is described. Heat transfer fluid loops were insulated and modified for isothermal operation. Software development for HYCSOS manual mode operation was completed. Routines to handle data acquisition, logging, compression, correction and plotting, using a Tektronix Graphics system with flexible disk data storage, provide a rapid and versatile means of presenting HYCSOS data for analysis. Advanced concept heat exchangers to improve the heat transfer of the hydride bed with the heat transfer fluid are discussed. Preliminary tests made with a LaNi5 loaded aluminum foam test unit showed that heat transfer properties are very markedly improved. Thermodynamic expressions are applied to the selection of alloys for use in HYCSOS. The substitution of aluminum for nickel in AB5 type alloys is shown to reduce hysteresis and permits the use of potentially lower cost materials with added flexibility for the optimization of engineering design and performance characteristics of the hydride heat pump system. Transient thermal measurements on hydride beds of CaNi5 and LaNi5 show no deterioration with cycling. Relatively slow heat transfer between the hydride beds and heat transfer fluid in the coiled tube heat exchangers is indicated by temperature lag of the bed and heat transfer fluid. Improved heat transfer is anticipated with aluminum foam heat exchangers.
Date: April 1979
Creator: Sheft, Irving; Gruen, Dieter M. & Lamich, George
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Thermally activated heat pumps

Description: This article describes research to develop efficient gas-fired heat pumps heat and cool buildings without CFCs. Space heating and cooling use 46% of all energy consumed in US buildings. Air-conditioning is the single leading cause of peak demand for electricity and is a major user of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Advanced energy conversion technology can save 50% of this energy and eliminate CFCs completely. Besides saving energy, advanced systems substantially reduce emissions of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas), sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides, which contribute to smog and acid rain. These emissions result from the burning of fossil fuels used to generate electricity. The Office of Building Technologies (OBT) of the US Department of Energy supports private industry`s efforts to improve energy efficiency and increase the use of renewable energy in buildings. To help industry, OBT, through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is currently working on thermally activated heat pumps. OBT has selected the following absorption heat pump systems to develop: generator-absorber heat-exchange (GAX) cycle for heating-dominated applications in residential and light commercial buildings; double-condenser-coupled (DCC) cycle for commercial buildings. In addition, OBT is developing computer-aided design software for investigating the absorption cycle.
Date: May 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Process Integration Study of Cache Valley Cheese Plant [Advanced Industrial Heat Pump Applications and Evaluations]

Description: This work has carried out in two phases: Phase 1; identification of opportunities for heat pumps in industrial applications and Phase 2; evaluation of heat pumps in industrial applications. In Phase 1, pinch analysis was applied to several industrial sites to identify the best opportunities for heat pumping and other forms of heat integration. In Phase 2, more detailed analyses were undertaken, including the evaluation of a heat pump installed as a recommendation of Phase 1.
Date: October 1, 1991
Creator: Eastwood, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Process Integration Study [Advanced Industrial Heat Pump Applications and Evaluations]

Description: This work was carried out in two phases: Phase 1; identification of opportunities for heat pumps in industrial applications and Phase 2; evaluation of heat pumps in industrial applications. In Phase 1, pinch analysis was applied to several industrial sites to identify the best opportunities for heat pumping and other forms of heat integration. In Phase 2, more detailed analyses were undertaken, including the evaluation of a heat pump installed as a recommendation of Phase 1.
Date: June 1, 1992
Creator: Eastwood, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Environmental benefits of different types of heat pumps, available and expected

Description: A brief overview of integrated resource planning (IRP) is provided, with emphasis on how stakeholders interact within the process and where the opportunities may lie for heat pump advocates in cold climates. Five heat pump options that represent various approaches for improving heat pump cold weather performance are included here in a comparative analysis: 2-speed electric air source heat pumps, variable-speed electric air source heat pumps, electric ground-source heat pumps, natural gas engine-driven heat pumps, and natural gas absorption heat pumps. The comparative analysis addresses seasonal performance, seasonal peak demand, air pollutant emissions, customer energy costs, and recognition of environmental externalities in IRP, all in the context of a residential application in the Great Lakes region of the US. Several actions that may be in the interest of heat pump stakeholders in cold climates were identified, including: development of improved software for utility planners, advocacy of a practical form of the Societal Test for use in IRP that credits heat pumps for the residential air pollutant emissions that they avoid, and development of practical methods to credit heat pumps with other environmental benefits for which they may be responsible.
Date: November 1, 1993
Creator: Hughes, P. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integration of Low Energy Technologies for Optimal Building and Space Conditioning Design

Description: EnergyPlus is the DOE's newest building energy simulation engine. It was developed specifically to support the design of low energy building systems. This project focused on developing new low energy building simulation models for EnergyPlus, verifying and validating new and existing EnergyPlus models and transferring the new technology to the private sector. The project focused primarily on geothermal and radiant technologies, which are related by the fact that both are based on hydronic system design. As a result of this project eight peer reviewed journal and conference papers were added to the archival literature and five technical reports were published as M.S. theses and are available in the archival literature. In addition, several reports, including a trombe wall validation report were written for web publication. Thirteen new or significantly enhanced modules were added to the EnergyPlus source code and forty-two new or significantly enhanced sections were added to the EnergyPlus documentation as a result of this work. A low energy design guide was also developed as a pedagogical tool and is available for web publication. Finally several tools including a hybrid ground source heat pump optimization program and a geothermal heat pump parameter estimation tool were developed for research and design and are available for web publication.
Date: January 7, 2006
Creator: Fisher, D.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

NREL GHP [Geothermal Heat Pump] Showcase: GHP Installation and Intensive in situ and Performance Monitoring at NREL's Solar Radiation and Research Laboratory; Preprint

Description: This document provides an overview of the geothermal heat pump (GHP) showcase at NREL and how it will help the SRRL site move forward with the goal of being a model of sustainability within the NREL campus, providing an effective demonstration of GHP systems and needed space conditioning for laboratory expansion.
Date: July 1, 2010
Creator: Anderson, E. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of Residential GSHP System

Description: This report first briefly reviews geothermal heat pump (GHP) technology and the current status of the GHP industry in the United States. Then it assesses the potential national benefits, in terms of energy savings, reduced summer peak electrical demand, consumer energy cost savings, and reduced CO{sub 2} emissions from retrofitting the space heating, space cooling, and water heating systems in existing U.S. single-family homes with state-of-the-art GHP systems. The investment for retrofitting typical U.S. single-family homes with state-of-the-art GHP systems is also analyzed using the metrics of net present value and levelized cost.
Date: September 1, 2010
Creator: Liu, Xiaobing
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Commercialization of air conditioning heat pump/water heater. Final technical report, Volume 2: Appendix A through E

Description: This is the final technical report on a commercialization project for an air conditioning heat pump water heater. The objective of the project was to produce a saleable system which would be economically competitive with natural gas and cost effective with regard to initial cost versus annual operating costs. The development and commercialization of the system is described. Compiled data included in numerous figures, tables and graphs.
Date: January 30, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Commercialization of air conditioning heat pump/water heater. Final technical report, Volume 1: Transmittal documents; Executive summary; Project summary

Description: This is the final technical report on a commercialization project for an air conditioning heat pump water heater. The objective of the project was to produce a saleable system which would be economically competitive with natural gas and cost effective with regard to initial cost versus annual operating costs. The development and commercialization of the system is described.
Date: January 30, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monitored energy use of homes with geothermal heat pumps: A compilation and analysis of performance. Final report

Description: The performance of residential geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) was assessed by comparing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system and whole house energy use of GHP houses and control houses. Actual energy savings were calculated and compared to expected savings (based on ARI ratings and literature) and predicted savings (based on coefficient of performance - COP - measurements). Differences between GHP and control houses were normalized for heating degree days and floor area or total insulation value. Predicted savings were consistently slightly below expected savings but within the range of performance cited by the industry. Average rated COP was 3.4. Average measured COP was 3.1. Actual savings were inconsistent and sometimes significantly below predicted savings. No correlation was found between actual savings and actual energy use. This suggests that factors such as insulation and occupant behavior probably have greater impact on energy use than type of HVAC equipment. There was also no clear correlation between climate and actual savings or between climate and actual energy use. There was a trend between GHP installation date and savings. Newer units appear to have lower savings than some of the older units which is opposite of what one would expect given the increase in rated efficiencies of GHPs. There are a number of explanations for why actual savings are repeatedly below rated savings or predicted savings. Poor ground loop sizing or installation procedures could be an issue. Given that performance is good compared to ASHPs but poor compared to electric resistance homes, the shortfall in savings could be due to duct leakage. The takeback effect could also be a reason for lower than expected savings. Occupants of heat pump homes are likely to heat more rooms and to use more air-conditioning than occupants of electric resistance homes. 10 refs., 17 figs., 10 tabs.
Date: December 1, 1997
Creator: Stein, J.R. & Meier, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Commercialization of air conditioning heat pump/water heater. Final technical report, Volume 3: Appendix F through I

Description: This is the final technical report on a commercialization project for an air conditioning heat pump water heater. The objective of the project was to produce a saleable system which would be economically competitive with natural gas and cost effective with regard to initial cost versus annual operating costs. The development and commercialization of the system is described. Compiled data included in numerous figures, tables and graphs.
Date: January 30, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Oak Ridge Heat Pump Design Model: Mark III Version Program Documentation

Description: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a leader in the development of analytical tools for the design of electrically driven, air-to-air heat pumps. Foremost among these tools is the ORNL Heat Pump Design Model, which can be used to predict the steady-state heating and cooling performance of an electrically driven, air-source heat pump. The ORNL Heat Pump Design Model has continued to evolve since the users' manual for the program, ORNL/CON-80/R1, was last revised in August 1983. This series of modifications to the heat pump model resulted in the Mark III Version, which is three to five times faster, easier to use, and more versatile than earlier versions and can be executed on a personal computer. The major changes made to earlier versions of the heat pump model relate to the organization of the input data, elimination of redundant calculations in the compressor and refrigerant property computations, improvement of thermostatic expansion valve and capillary tube correlations, revision of output format, and modifications to enable the model to run on a personal computer. The Mark III Version of the ORNL Heat Pump Design Model is a comprehensive, easy-to-use program for the simulation of an electrically driven, air-source heat pump.
Date: January 1, 1988
Creator: Fischer, S.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal(Ground-Source)Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers

Description: More effective stewardship of our resources contributes to the security, environmental sustainability, and economic well-being of the nation. Buildings present one of the best opportunities to economically reduce energy consumption and limit greenhouse gas emissions. Geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), sometimes called ground-source heat pumps, have been proven capable of producing large reductions in energy use and peak demand in buildings. However, GHPs have received little attention at the policy level as an important component of a national strategy. Have policymakers mistakenly overlooked GHPs, or are GHPs simply unable to make a major contribution to the national goals for various reasons? This brief study was undertaken at DOE's request to address this conundrum. The scope of the study includes determining the status of global GHP markets and the status of the GHP industry and technology in the United States, assembling previous estimates of GHP energy savings potential, identifying key barriers to application of GHPs, and identifying actions that could accelerate market adoption of GHPs. The findings are documented in this report along with conclusions and recommendations.
Date: December 1, 2008
Creator: Hughes, Patrick
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal Heat Pump Benchmarking Report

Description: A benchmarking study was conducted on behalf of the Department of Energy to determine the critical factors in successful utility geothermal heat pump programs. A Successful program is one that has achieved significant market penetration. Successfully marketing geothermal heat pumps has presented some major challenges to the utility industry. However, select utilities have developed programs that generate significant GHP sales. This benchmarking study concludes that there are three factors critical to the success of utility GHP marking programs: (1) Top management marketing commitment; (2) An understanding of the fundamentals of marketing and business development; and (3) An aggressive competitive posture. To generate significant GHP sales, competitive market forces must by used. However, because utilities have functioned only in a regulated arena, these companies and their leaders are unschooled in competitive business practices. Therefore, a lack of experience coupled with an intrinsically non-competitive culture yields an industry environment that impedes the generation of significant GHP sales in many, but not all, utilities.
Date: January 17, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department