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Disposal of fluidized-bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence

Description: During Phase I (first 18 months) the project is segregated into four areas of reporting: (A) Grout Formulation, (B) Grout Characterization, (C) Water Quality Monitoring, (D) Subsidence Control & Contaminant Transport. The first component involves formulating a grout mixture with appropriate flowability to be used in filling complex mine voids. The Grout Characterization component will determine the flow characteristics of the formulated grout. The Water Quality component involves background monitoring of water quality and precipitation at the Phase III (Longridge) mine site. The last component involves evaluating the strength requirements and the migration of contaminants through the candidate grouts. This report separately discusses progress on all components of the program in order of project subtask.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of a low-level radioactive waste grout: Sampling and test results

Description: WHC manages and operates the grout treatment facility at Hanford as part of a DOE program to clean up wastes stored at federal nuclear production sites. PNL provides support to the grout disposal program through pilot-scale tests, performance assessments, and formulation verification activities. in 1988 and 1989, over one million gallons of a low-level radioactive liquid waste was processed through the facility to produce a grout waste that was then deposited in an underground vault. The liquid waste was phosphate/sulfate waste (PSW) generated in decontamination of the N Reactor. PNL sampled and tested the grout produced during the second half of the PSW campaign to support quality verification activities prior to grout vault closure. Samples of grout were obtained by inserting nested-tube samplers into the grout slurry in the vault. After the grout had cured, the inner tube of the sampler was removed and the grout samples extracted. Tests for compressive strength, sonic velocity, and leach testing were used to assess grout quality; results were compared to those from pilot-scale test grouts made with a simulated PSW. The grout produced during the second half of the PSW campaign exceeded compressive strength and leachability formulation criteria. The nested tube samplers were effective in collecting samples of grout although their use introduced greater variability into the compressive strength data.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Martin, P.F.C. & Lokken, R.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Alternative disposal options for alpha-mixed low-level waste

Description: This paper presents several disposal options for the Department of Energy alpha-mixed low-level waste. The mixed nature of the waste favors thermally treating the waste to either an iron-enriched basalt or glass waste form, at which point a multitude of reasonable disposal options, including in-state disposal, are a possibility. Most notably, these waste forms will meet the land-ban restrictions. However, the thermal treatment of this waste involves considerable waste handling and complicated/expensive offgas systems with secondary waste management problems. In the United States, public perception of offgas systems in the radioactive incinerator area is unfavorable. The alternatives presented here are nonthermal in nature and involve homogenizing the waste with cryogenic techniques followed by complete encapsulation with a variety of chemical/grouting agents into retrievable waste forms. Once encapsulated, the waste forms are suitable for transport out of the state or for actual in-state disposal. This paper investigates variances that would have to be obtained and contrasts the alternative encapsulation idea with the thermal treatment option.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Loomis, G.G. & Sherick, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Durability of double-shell tank waste grouts

Description: This report summarizes results of studies conducted in FY89 to assess the durability of grouted DST waste. This is in support of WHC`s grout disposal program to determine the physical/chemical properties of simulated DST grouts cured for extended time periods at elevated temperatures. This report presents results of tests on simulated DST grout samples cured up to 6 months at 75 to 95 C. All the testing and characterization were done on a single formulation of DS slurry feed grout. The simulated waste was the same as in the Nov. 1988 pilot- scale test of grout processing. The dry blend (47 wt% slag, 47 wt% class F fly ash, 6 wt% type I/II portland cement) was mixed with the simulated waste at a mix ratio of 9 lb/gal. Resultant grout slurry was cast into molds and cured at 100% RH at 75, 85, and 95 C. Leach resistance and compressive strength decreased with curing times and temperatures. The samples absorbed water during curing (up to 9 wt%) as a result of osmotic pressures caused by the high salt content within the grout, and this may have caused microcracking and reduced strength. Cracking due to increased internal pressures from salt crystallization also may have occurred as the samples cooled from curing.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Lokken, R.O.; Martin, P.F.C. & Shade, J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Removal action report on Waste Area Grouping 4 seeps 4 and 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: This report documents removal action activities for a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) non-time-critical removal action as described in the Action Memorandum prepared in 1996. The technical objective of this removal action was to reduce the release of strontium 90 ({sup 90}Sr) into an ephemeral tributary to White Oak Creek from Waste Area Grouping 4 (WAG 4) seeps, as measured at Monitoring Station (MS) 1 at ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN. Design was initiated in early January 1996 and grouting activities were completed in late October 9996. Portions of four waste disposal trenches were injected using low-temperature permeation grouting technology with multiple formulations of grouts to reduce the in situ hydraulic conductivity of the waste materials and ultimately reduce the off-site transport of {sup 90}Sr.
Date: December 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Field-scale permeation testing of jet-grouted buried waste sites

Description: The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) conducted field-scale hydraulic conductivity testing of simulated buried waste sites with improved confinement. The improved confinement was achieved by jet grouting the buried waste, thus creating solid monoliths. The hydraulic conductivity of the monoliths was determined using both the packer technique and the falling head method. The testing was performed on simulated buried waste sites utilizing a variety of encapsulating grouts, including high-sulfate-resistant Portland cement, TECT, (a proprietary iron oxide cement) and molten paraffin. By creating monoliths using in-situ jet grouting of encapsulating materials, the waste is simultaneously protected from subsidence and contained against further migration of contaminants. At the INEL alone there is 56,000 m{sup 3} of buried transuranic waste commingled with 170,000--224,000 m{sup 3} of soil in shallow land burial. One of the options for this buried waste is to improve the confinement and leave it in place for final disposal. Knowledge of the hydraulic conductivity for these monoliths is important for decision-makers. The packer tests involved coring the monolith, sealing off positions within the core with inflatable packers, applying pressurized water to the matrix behind the seal, and observing the water flow rate. The falling head tests were performed in full-scale 3-m-diameter, 3-m-high field-scale permeameters. In these permeameters, both water inflow and outflow were measured and equated to a hydraulic conductivity.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Loomis, G.G. & Zdinak, A.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Direct Grout Stabilization of High Cesium Salt Waste: Salt Alternative Phase III Feasibility Study

Description: The direct grout alternative is a viable option for treatment/stabilization and disposal of salt waste containing Cs-137 concentrations of 1-3 Ci/gal. The composition of the direct grout salt solution is higher in sodium salts and contains up to a few hundred ppm Cs-137 more than the current reference salt solution. However it is still similar to the composition of the current reference salt solution. Consequently, the processing, setting, and leaching properties (including TCLP for Cr and Hg) of the direct grout and current saltstone waste forms are very similar. The significant difference between these waste solutions is that the high cesium salt solution will contain between 1 and 3 Curies of Cs-137 per gallon compared to a negligible amount in the current salt solution. This difference will require special engineering and shielding for a direct grout processing facility and disposal units to achieve acceptable radiation exposure conditions. The Cs-137 concentration in the direct grout salt solution will also affect the long-term curing temperature of the waste form since 4.84 Watts of energy are generated per 1000 Ci of Cs-137. The temperature rise of the direct grout during long-term curing has been calculated by A. Shaddy, SRTC.1 The effect of curing temperature on the strength, leaching and physical durability of the direct grout saltstone is described in this report. At the present time, long term curing at 90 degrees C appears to be unacceptable because of cracking which will affect the structural integrity as evaluated in the immersion test. (The experiments conducted in this feasibility study do not address the effect of cracking on leaching of contaminants other than Cr, Hg, and Cs.) No cracking of the direct grout or reference saltstone waste forms was observed for samples cured at 70 degrees C. At the present time the implications of waste ...
Date: December 7, 1998
Creator: Langton, C.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Formulation verification study results for Tank 106-AN waste

Description: Because of the excessive heat generated during hydration of double- shell tank waste grouts using 47 wt% blast furnace slag/47 wt% class F fly ash/6 wt% type I/II Portland cement, a modified formulation was recommended for testing of Tank 106-AN grout. The recommended dry blend is: 40 wt% agricultural grade CaCO{sub 3} (ground limestone), 28 wt% blast furnace slag, 28 wt% class F fly ash, and 4 wt% type I/II cement. Verification studies with this dry blend showed that the only criterion not met in all cases was for drainable liquid.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Lokken, R.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Durability of double-shell slurry feed grouts: FY-90 results

Description: Plans for disposal of the low-level fraction of selected double-shell tank wastes at Hanford include grouting. Grout disposal is the process of mixing low-level liquid waste with cementitious powders and pumping the slurry to near-surface, underground concrete vaults; hydration results in the formation of a solid product that binds/encapsulates the radioactive/hazardous constituents. In this durability program, previous studies have indicated a strong impact from curing temperature/time on strength and leach resistance of DSSF grouts. The current studies were expanded to determine whether these impacts could be attributed to other factors, such as dry blend composition and waste concentration. Major conclusions: grouts from dry blends with 40 wt% limestone had lower strengths; compressive strengths and leach resistance decreased with increased curing temperature/time; leach resistance increased for grouts prepared with dilute DSSF; nitrate leach resistance increased with high slag/cement ratios, dilute DSSF, and low curing temperatures; amount of drainable liquids for grouts using diluted DSSF was lowest when slag content was high; the 2 most significant factors affecting grout properties were the slag/cement ratio and waste dilution (slag-waste reactions appear to dominate the properties of DSSF grouts).
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Lokken, R.O. & Martin, P.F.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Heat of hydration of double-shell slurry feed grouts

Description: Samples of double-shell slurry feed (DSSF) grout (used in solidifying the waste stored in DS tanks at Hanford) were prepared and tested in adiabatic calorimeters to determine the effect of waste concentration and dry blend variations on the heat of hydration. Changes in DSSF waste concentration had the greatest impact on the overall heat of hydration of the grouts. Grouts prepared with dilute (100 times) DSSF had temperature rises up to 37 C less than with grouts prepared that for undiluted DSSF (15 C vs 52 C). All the grouts prepared with undiluted DSSF had temperature rises that exceeded 45 C. Partial neutralization of the DSSF with acids resulted in delayed reactions and lower temperature rises than that occurring in the reference grout. The temperature rise of a DSSF grout prepared with waste partially neutralized with HCl was 28 C after 300 hr hydration. Temperature rise for a grout made with DSSF partially neutralized with H3PO4 was 43 C. These values compare with a temperature rise of >52 C for a grout made with untreated DSSF. Decreasing the mix ratio from 9 lb/gal to 7.5 lb/gal did not significantly reduce the adiabatic temperature rise of grouts prepared with partially neutralized DSSF waste.
Date: December 1, 1992
Creator: Lokken, R.O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Completion report for the isolation and remediation of inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste tanks 7562, H-209, and T-30 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: A human health risk analysis was conducted on inactive tanks 7562, H-209 and T-30 to determine the method for remediating the tanks. Risk analysis results indicated that the health risk associated with these tanks were within or below the EPA range of concern of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}. On the basis of these results, and with regulator approval, it was determined that either no action or in-place stabilization of the tanks would satisfy risk-based remediation goals. Therefore, a decision was made and approved by DOE to remediate these tanks in-place as a maintenance action. Tanks H-209 and T-30 were isolated from associated piping, electrical systems, and instrumentation and grouted in-place. Due to regulatory concerns over the location of tank 7562 relative to an area of subsurface soil contamination, tank 7562 was isolated from associated piping and instrumentation and left in-place empty. Completion of these maintenance actions has met the intent of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for remediation of inactive tanks H-209 and T-30. EPA and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) will be requested to approve a change to the FFA removing tanks H-209 and T-30 from the Appendix F list of inactive tanks. The request for removal of tank 7562 from Appendix F will be submitted pending final disposition of the tank. Since the associated tank piping systems remain in-place, it will further be requested that these systems be included as individual sites in Appendix C of the FFA for future remedial consideration.
Date: December 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Decontamination systems information and research program -- Literature review in support of development of standard test protocols and barrier design models for in situ formed barriers project

Description: The US Department of Energy is responsible for approximately 3,000 sites in which contaminants such as carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, perchlorethylene, non-volatile and soluble organic and insoluble organics (PCBs and pesticides) are encountered. In specific areas of these sites radioactive contaminants are stored in underground storage tanks which were originally designed and constructed with a 30-year projected life. Many of these tanks are now 10 years beyond the design life and failures have occurred allowing the basic liquids (ph of 8 to 9) to leak into the unconsolidated soils below. Nearly one half of the storage tanks located at the Hanford Washington Reservation are suspected of leaking and contaminating the soils beneath them. The Hanford site is located in a semi-arid climate region with rainfall of less than 6 inches annually, and studies have indicated that very little of this water finds its way to the groundwater to move the water down gradient toward the Columbia River. This provides the government with time to develop a barrier system to prevent further contamination of the groundwater, and to develop and test remediation systems to stabilize or remove the contaminant materials. In parallel to remediation efforts, confinement and containment technologies are needed to retard or prevent the advancement of contamination plumes through the environment until the implementation of remediation technology efforts are completed. This project examines the various confinement and containment technologies and protocols for testing the materials in relation to their function in-situ.
Date: December 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mechanical response of shock conditioned HPNS-5 (R-1) grout

Description: HPNS-5 (R-1) grout is a portland cement formulated mix designed for use as a rigid containment plug in vertical boreholes at the Nevada Test Site. Coincident with field testing of this grout in 1991 and 1992 , two arums of the grout mix were collected and positioned in the by pass drift of the DISTANT ZENITH event to expose the grout to passage of a nuclear driven stress wave. The drums were later retrieved to determine the mechanical behavior of the shock conditioned grout. Sealed hollow tubes positioned within the grout-filled drums to detect ductile flow on passage of the stress wave were found partially to completely filled with HPNS-5 grout following the experiment. Static mechanical tests support the evidence for ductile flow and place the transition from brittle fracture failure to ductile behavior in the shock conditioned grout at a confining stress between ambient and 5 MPa (725 psi). Uniaxial and triaxial tests delineated a stress-strain field for interstice collapse that interposes between the mechanics of linear elastic deformation and dilatancy. Hydrostatic stress loading between 25 MPa (3.6 ksi) and 60 MPa (8.7 ksi) results in a significant change of permanent set from 1% to greater than 15% volume strain.
Date: December 9, 1997
Creator: Plannerer, H.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Completion report for the isolation and remediation of inactive liquid low-level radioactive waste tanks LA-104, WC-7, and 4501-P at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

Description: This report provides documentation of the maintenance action completion for remediation of tanks LA-104, WC-7, and 4501-P at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report will serve as the remediation completion documentation for the request to remove these tanks from the Federal Facility Agreement listing.
Date: December 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Demonstration of close-coupled barriers for subsurface containment of buried waste

Description: The primary objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin inner lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. Close-coupled barrier technology is applicable for final, interim, or emergency containment of subsurface waste forms. Consequently, when considering the diversity of technology application, the construction emplacement and material technology maturity, general site operational requirements, and regulatory compliance incentives, the close-coupled barrier system provides an alternative for any hazardous or mixed waste remediation plan. This paper discusses the installation of a close-coupled barrier and the subsequent integrity verification.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Dwyer, B.P.; Heiser, J. & Stewart, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance of cement-based seal-system components in a waste-disposal environment

Description: A grout based on portland cement, Class F fly ash, and bentonite clay was developed as part of the closure system of shallow subsurface structures for disposal of low-activity radioactive wastes. Heat output, volume change, and compressive strength of the sealing grout were monitored with time, at elevated temperature, and in physical models, to determine if this closure grout could maintain adequate volume stability and other required physical properties in the internal environment of the disposal structure. To determine if contact with an alkaline liquid waste would cause chemical deterioration of the sealing grout, cured specimens were immersed in a liquid waste simulant containing high concentrations of sodium and aluminum salts. After 21 days at 60 C, specimens increased in mass without significant changes in volume. XRD revealed crystallization of sodium aluminum silicate hydrate. The new phase has an XRD pattern similar to the commercial synthetic zeolite Losod. Scanning electron microscopy used with x-ray fluorescence showed that clusters of this phase had formed in grout pores, to increase rout density and decrease its effective porosity. Testing was repeated at 100 C for 5 days using a simulant containing sodium hydroxide and aluminum nitrate and results were similar. Physical and chemical tests indicate acceptable performance of this grout as a seal-system component.
Date: December 31, 1994
Creator: Malone, P.G.; Wakeley, L.D.; Burkes, J.P. & McDaniel, E.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High volume-high value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines: Phase 2 -- Field investigations. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1997

Description: During this quarter, the majority of activity focused on grout emplacement at the Lodestar Energy Inc. (formerly Costain Coal Co.) surface mine auger holes described in the previous report. Specifically, two different types of grout pumps were investigated: a piston pump used in previous demonstrations, and a progressive cavity pump. The latter is currently utilized for grouting in underground coal mines, is relatively small and portable, and is capable of receiving dry material (e.g., fly ash) and water, mixing it to produce a grout, and pumping the grout at high pressure. It is therefore worthwhile to investigate it`s potential use in auger mine filling. Several field demonstrations were conducted using the different pumps. Numerous problems were encountered when using the progressive cavity pump, all of which were related to its inability to handle the highly reactive and heterogeneous FBC fly ash. Even relatively small ash agglomerates (<1 in. in diameter), which were not a problem for the larger piston pump, caused blockages in the progressive cavity pump which not only proved extremely difficult to clear, but also resulted in significant mechanical failures. Furthermore, mixing of dry fly ash with water within the progressive cavity pump was inconsistent and difficult to control. Consequently, the pump was unable to completely fill even a single auger hole. It was found that a large proportion of bed ash in the grout generated a large amount of heat and caused early stiffening of the material. During the experiments, cylinders of grout were prepared for compressive strength testing, and moisture contents were determined on-site. A thermocouple assembly was also constructed to record grout temperatures within an auger hole.
Date: December 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

International Containment Technology Conference: proceedings

Description: This document contains the manuscripts of the papers and posters presented at the 1997 International Containment Technology Conference and Exhibition. These manuscripts represent a valuable compilation of information and data on the environmental challenges and technology-based solutions associated with containment technologies. The purpose of the conference was to promote the advancement of containment technologies by providing a forum from which participants from related disciplines could meet to exchange ideas and information on recent developments. Selected papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.
Date: December 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Grout and vitrification formula development for immobilization of hazardous radioactive tank sludges at ORNL

Description: Stabilization/solidification (S/S) has been identified as the preferred treatment option for hazardous radioactive sludges, and currently grouting and vitrification are considered the leading candidate S/S technologies. Consequently, a project was initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to define composition envelopes, or operating windows, for acceptable grout and glass formulations containing Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) sludges. The resulting data are intended to be used as guidance for the eventual treatment of the MVST sludges by the government and/or private sector. Wastewater at ORNL is collected, evaporated, and stored in the MVSTs pending treatment for disposal. The waste separates into two phases: sludge and supernate. The sludges in the tank bottoms have been accumulating for several years and contain a high amount of radioactivity, with some classified as transuranic (TRU) sludges. The available total constituent analysis for the MVST sludge indicates that the Resource and Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) metal concentrations are high enough to be potentially RCRA hazardous; therefore, these sludges have the potential to be designated as mixed TRU waste. S/S treatment must be performed to remove free liquids and reduce the leach rate of RCRA metals. This paper focuses on initial results for the development of the operating window for vitrification. However, sufficient data on grouting are presented to allow a comparison of the two options.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Gilliam, T.M. & Spence, R.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated process analyses studies on mixed low level and transuranic wastes. Summary report

Description: Options for integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment systems for mixed low-level waste (MLLW) are compared such as total life cycle cost (TLCC), cost sensitivities, risk, energy requirements, final waste volume, and aqueous and gaseous effluents. The comparisons were derived by requiring all conceptual systems to treat the same composition of waste with the same operating efficiency. Thus, results can be used as a general guideline for the selection of treatment and disposal concepts. However, specific applications of individual systems will require further analysis. The potential for cost saving options and the research and development opportunities are summarized.
Date: December 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pore solution chemistry of simulated low-level liquid waste incorporated in cement grouts

Description: Expressed pore solutions from simulated low level liquid waste cement grouts cured at room temperature, 50{degree}C and 90{degree}C for various duration were analyzed by standard chemical methods and ion chromatography. The solid portions of the grouts were formulated with portland cement, fly ash, slag, and attapulgite clay in the ratios of 3:3:3:1. Two different solutions simulating off-gas condensates expected from vitrification of Hanford low level tank wastes were made. One is highly alkaline and contains the species Na{sup {plus}}, P0{sub 4}{sup 3-}, N0{sub 2}{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -} and OH{sup -}. The other is carbonated and contains the species, Na{sup {plus}}, PO{sub 4}{sup 3-}, NO{sub 2}{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}. In both cases phosphate rapidly disappeared from the pore solution, leaving behind sodium in the form of hydroxide. The carbonates were also removed from the pore solution to form calcium carbonate and possibly calcium monocarboaluminate. These reactions resulted in the increase of hydroxide ion concentration in the early period. Subsequently there was a significant reduction OH{sup -} and Na{sup {plus}} ion concentrations. In contrast high concentration of N0{sub 2}{sup -} and N0{sub 3}{sup -} were retained in the pore solution indefinitely.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Kruger, A.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0 with ROTC 1

Description: This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various locations and depths in the area associated with the ...
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Boehlecke, Robert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0

Description: This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various locations and depths in the area associated with the ...
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: Boehlecke, Robert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department