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Lance water injection tests adjacent to the 281-3H retention basin at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

Description: A pilot-scale field demonstration of waste isolation using viscous- liquid containment barriers has been planned for the 281-3H retention basin at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. The 281-3H basin is a shallow retention/seepage basin contaminated mainly by radionuclides. The viscous-liquid containment barrier utilizes the permeation of liquid grout to either entomb the contaminants within a monolithic grout structure or to isolate the waste by drastically reducing the permeability, of the soils around the plume. A clear understanding of the hydrogeologic setting of the retention basin is necessary for proper design of the viscous liquid barrier. To aid in the understanding of the hydrogeology of the 281-3H retention basin, and to obtain critical parameters necessary for grout injection design, a series of tests were undertaken in a region immediately adjacent to the basin. The objectives of the LWIT were: 1. To evaluate the general performance of the Lance Injection Technique for grout emplacement at the site, including the range and upper limits of injection pressures, the flow rates applicable for site conditions, as well as the mechanical forces needed for lance penetration. 2. To obtain detailed information on the injectability of the soils immediately adjacent to the H-area retention basin. 3. To identify any high permeability zones suitable for injection and evaluate their spatial distribution. 4. To perform ground penetrating radar (GPR) to gain information on the structure of the soil column and to compare the results with LWIT data. This report will focus on results pertinent to these objectives.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Freifeld, B.; Myer, L.; Moridis, G.; Cook, P.; James, A.; Pellerin, L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Performance assessment of grouted double-shell tank waste disposal at Hanford. Revision 1

Description: This document assesses the performance of the Grout Disposal Facility after closure. The facility and disposal environment are modeled to predict the long-term impacts of the disposal action. The document concludes that the disposal system provides reasonable assurance that doses to the public will remain within the performance objectives. This document is required for DOC Order 5820.2A.
Date: September 1, 1994
Creator: Shade, J.W., Kincaid, C.T.; Whyatt, G.A.; Rhoads, K.; Westsik, J.H. Jr.; Freshley, M.D.; Blanchard, K.A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of the viscous barrier technology

Description: This report is the design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s new subsurface containment technology for waste isolation using a new generation of barrier liquids. The test site is located in central California in a quarry owned by the Los Banos Gravel Company in Los Banos, California, in heterogeneous unsaturated deposits of sand, silt, and -ravel typical of many of the and DOE cleanup sites and particularly analogous to the Hanford site. The coals of the field demonstration are (a) to demonstrate the ability to create a continuous subsurface barrier isolating a medium-scale volume (30 ft long by 30 ft wide by 20 ft deep, i.e. 1/10th to 1/8th the size of a buried tank at the Hanford Reservation) in the subsurface, and (b) to demonstrate the continuity, performance, and integrity of the barrier.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Moridis, G.; Yen, P.; Persoff, P.; Finsterle, S.; Williams, P.; Myer, L. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Grout and glass performance in support of stabilization/solidification of ORNL tank sludges

Description: Wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collected, evaporated, and stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and Bethel Valley Evaporator Storage Tanks (BVEST) pending treatment for disposal. In addition, some sludges and supernatants also requiring treatment remain in two inactive tank systems: the gunite and associated tanks (GAAT) and the old hydrofracture (OHF) tank. The waste consists of two phases: sludge and supernatant. The sludges contain a high amount of radioactivity, and some are classified as TRU sludges. Some Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metal concentrations are high enough to be defined as RCRA hazardous; therefore, these sludges are presumed to be mixed TRU waste. Grouting and vitrification are currently two likely stabilization/solidification alternatives for mixed wastes. Grouting has been used to stabilize/solidify hazardous and low-level radioactive waste for decades. Vitrification has been developed as a high-level radioactive alternative for decades and has been under development recently as an alternative disposal technology for mixed waste. The objective of this project is to define an envelope, or operating window, for grout and glass formulations for ORNL tank sludges. Formulations will be defined for the average composition of each of the major tank farms (BVEST/MVST, GAAT, and OHF) and for an overall average composition of all tank farms. This objective is to be accomplished using surrogates of the tank sludges with hot testing of actual tank sludges to check the efficacy of the surrogates.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Spence, R.D.; Mattus, C.H. & Mattus, A.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Mathematical modeling of permeation grouting and subsurface barrier performance

Description: The injection of solution grouts into the subsurface can be used to form underground barriers for the containment of contaminants. The technology requires identifying suitable grout materials, specifically fluids which exhibit a large increase in viscosity after injection and eventually solidify after a controllable period, thus sealing permeable zones. The authors have developed a new fluid property module for the reservoir simulator TOUGH2 to model grout injection, taking into account the increase of liquid viscosity as a function of time and gel concentration. They have also incorporated into the simulator a model which calculates soil hydraulic properties after solidification of the gel within the pore space. The new fluid property module has been used to design and analyze laboratory experiments and field pilot tests in saturated and unsaturated formations under a variety of subsurface conditions. These applications include modeling barrier emplacement in highly heterogeneous soils in the vadose zone, grout injection into the saturated zone in combination with extraction wells for flow control, the design of verification strategies, and the analysis of barrier performance. In this paper the authors discuss the modeling approach and present simulation results of multiple grout injections into a heterogeneous, unsaturated formation.
Date: September 1, 1996
Creator: Finsterle, S.; Oldenburg, C.M.; James, A.L.; Pruess, K. & Moridis, G.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Materials testing for in situ stabilization treatability study of INEEL mixed wastes soils

Description: This report describes the contaminant-specific materials testing phase of the In Situ Stabilization Comprehensive Environment Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study (TS). The purpose of materials testing is to measure the effectiveness of grouting agents to stabilize Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Acid Pit soils and select a grout material for use in the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Treatability Study within the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Test results will assist the selecting a grout material for the follow-on demonstrations described in Test Plan for the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Phases of the In Situ Stabilization Treatability Study at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex.
Date: September 1, 1997
Creator: Heiser, J. & Fuhrmann, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Low-pressure, single-point grout injection for tank heel sludge mixing and in-situ immobilization

Description: This report describes tests conducted in an approximately 9-ft diameter test tank situated outside the 336 building in Hanford`s 300 area. The tests were performed to measure the ability of jets of grout slurry to mobilize and mix simulated tank sludge. The technique is intended for in situ immobilization of tank waste heels. The current approach uses a single, rotated, larger-diameter nozzle driven at lower pressure. Due to the larger diameter, the potential for plugging is reduced and the effective radius around an injection point over which the jet is effective in mobilizing sludge from the tank bottom can be made larger. A total of three grout injection tests were conducted in a 9-ft diameter tank. In each case, a 2-in. layer of kaolin clay paste was placed on a dry tank floor to simulate a sludge heel. The clay was covered with 4 inches of water. The grout slurry, consisting of Portland cement, class F fly ash, and eater, was prepared and delivered by an offsite vendor. In the third test, the sludge in half of the tank was replaced by a layer of 20x50 mesh zeolite, and bentonite clay was added to the grout formulation. After injection, the grout was allowed to set and then the entire grout monolith was manually broken up and excavated using a jack hammer. Intact pieces of clay were visually apparent due to a sharp color contrast between the grout and clay. Remaining clay deposits were collected and weighed and suspended clay pieces within the monolith were photographed. The mobilization performance of the grout jets exceeded expectations.
Date: September 1, 1998
Creator: Whyatt, G.A. & Hymas, C.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High volume-high value usage of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products in underground mines: Phase 2 -- Field investigations. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1998

Description: The factors that control the strength of FBC ash grout were the focus of work during this quarter. Samples were prepared at different water contents and placed into cylindrical PVC molds. At specified curing intervals, the grout cylinders were subjected to unconfined compressive strength testing as per procedures described in previous reports. Chemical, mineralogical, and microscopical analyses were also conducted on the samples. It was found that higher curing temperatures significantly increase the strength gain rate of the FBC ash grout, in agreement with earlier results. As expected, water content also exerts a strong influence on the strength of the grout. The compressive strength data obtained for the laboratory-prepared samples are in excellent agreement with strength data obtained on grout placed in auger holes during the field demonstrations. The data also indicate that the field samples suffered negligible deterioration over the course of the curing period in the auger holes. Analysis of the laboratory prepared grout samples using XRD revealed a mineralogy similar to the field samples. A correspondence between ettringite abundance and compressive strength was observed only during grout curing. The formation of minerals such as ettringite is apparently a good indication that curing reactions are progressing and that the grout strength is increasing, but mineral distribution by itself does not explain or predict final strength. The microscopy data, in combination with geotechnical and XRD data, suggest that the strength of the grout is largely a function of the density of an amorphous (or finely crystalline) material that comprises the majority of the cured grout. Therefore, an increase in density of this material results in an increase in grout strength.
Date: September 1, 1998
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report

Description: The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.
Date: September 30, 1999
Creator: Herbst, A. K.; McCray, J. A.; Kirkham, R. J.; Pao, J. & Hinckley, S. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford waste vitrification systems risk assessment

Description: A systematic Risk Assessment was performed to identify the technical, regulatory, and programmatic uncertainties and to quantify the risks to the Hanford Site double-shell tank waste vitrification program baseline (as defined in December 1990). Mitigating strategies to reduce the overall program risk were proposed. All major program elements were evaluated, including double-shell tank waste characterization, Tank Farms, retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and grouting. Computer-based techniques were used to quantify risks to proceeding with construction of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant on the present baseline schedule. Risks to the potential vitrification of single-shell tank wastes and cesium and strontium capsules were also assessed. 62 refs., 38 figs., 26 tabs.
Date: September 1, 1991
Creator: Miller, W.C.; Hamilton, D.W.; Holton, L.K. & Bailey, J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Leach test of cladding removal waste grout using Hanford groundwater

Description: This report describes laboratory experiments performed during 1986-1990 designed to produce empirical leach rate data for cladding removal waste (CRW) grout. At the completion of the laboratory work, funding was not available for report completion, and only now during final grout closeout activities is the report published. The leach rates serve as inputs to computer codes used in assessing the potential risk from the migration of waste species from disposed grout. This report discusses chemical analyses conducted on samples of CRW grout, and the results of geochemical computer code calculations that help identify mechanisms involved in the leaching process. The semi-infinite solid diffusion model was selected as the most representative model for describing leaching of grouts. The use of this model with empirically derived leach constants yields conservative predictions of waste release rates, provided no significant changes occur in the grout leach processes over long time periods. The test methods included three types of leach tests--the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent solution exchange test, a static leach test, and a once-through flow column test. The synthetic CRW used in the tests was prepared in five batches using simulated liquid waste spiked with several radionuclides: iodine ({sup 125}I), carbon ({sup 14}C), technetium ({sup 99}Tc), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), strontium ({sup 85}Sr), americium ({sup 241}Am), and plutonium ({sup 238}Pu). The grout was formed by mixing the simulated liquid waste with dry blend containing Type I and Type II Portland cement, class F fly ash, Indian Red Pottery clay, and calcium hydroxide. The mixture was allowed to set and cure at room temperature in closed containers for at least 46 days before it was tested.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J. & Legore, V.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of dry-solids-blend material source for grouts containing 106-AN waste: Final report

Description: Stabilization/solidification technology is one of the most widely used techniques for the treatment and ultimate disposal of both radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes. Cement-based products, commonly referred to as grouts, are the predominant materials of choice because of their low associated processing costs, compatibility with a wide variety of disposal scenarios, and ability to meet stringent processing and performance requirements. Such technology is being utilized in a Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the disposal of various wastes, including 106-AN wastes, located on the Hanford Reservation. The WHC personnel have developed a grout formula for 106-AN disposal that is designed to meet stringent performance requirements. This formula consists of a dry-solids blend containing 40 wt % limestone, 28 wt % granulated blast furnace slag (BFS), 28 wt % American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Class F fly ash, and 4 wt % Type I-II-LA Portland cement. This blend is mixed with 106-AN at a mix ratio of 9 lb of dry-solids blend per gallon of waste. This report documents the final results of efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of WHC`s Grout Technology Program to assess the effects of the source of the dry-solids-blend materials on the resulting grout formula.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Spence, R. D.; Gilliam, T. M.; Osborne, S. C.; Francis, C. L. & Trotter, D. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of grout formulations for 106-AN waste: Mixture-experiment results and analysis. Volume 2, Data presentation

Description: Twenty potential ingredients were identified for use in developing a 106-AN grout formulation, and 18 were subsequently obtained and tested. Four ingredients: Type II-LA (moderate heat of hydration) Portland cement, Class F fly ash, attapulgite 150 drilling clay, and ground air-cooled blast-furnace slag (GABFS) -- were selected for developing the 106-AN grout formulations. A mixture experiment was designed and conducted around the following formulation: 2.5 lb of cement per gallon, 1.2 lb of fly ash per gallon, 0.8 lb of attapulgite per gallon, and 3.5 lb of GABFS per gallon. Reduced empirical models were generated from the results of the mixture experiment. These models were used to recommend several grout formulations for 106-AN. Westinghouse Hanford Company selected one of these formulations to be verified for use with 106-AN and a backup formulation in case problems arise with the first choice. This report presents the mixture-experimental results and leach data.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Spence, R. D.; McDaniel, E. W.; Anderson, C. M.; Lokken, R. O. & Piepel, G. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Chemical Separations in Support of the Clean Option Strategy

Description: The objective of the Clean Option Strategy is to reduce the volume of waste from Hanford Storage tanks that must be vitrified and subsequently buried in a deep geologic repository to less than 1000 canisters (1) Advanced chemical separations in support of the Clean Option Strategy comprise a series of novel processes that are designed to extract and recover U, TRUs (Np, Pu, Am, Cm), {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc and {sup 137}Cs from dissolved sludge waste obtained from Hanford storage tanks. All inert constituents and the balance of the fission products, including barium and the lanthanides (Ln), will remain in the raffinates and effluent streams generated in these processes. The aim of the advanced chemical processes is to reduce the complexity and cost of the chemical pretreatment of the dissolved sludge from the single- and double-shelled tanks. To achieve this goal, Hanford must minimize the number of processes to extract U, TRUs, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc and {sup 137}Cs, minimize the number of times that the initial volume of dissolved sludge must be handled, and concentrate product streams to reduce the scale of operation. To meet the requirements of advanced chemical separation processes, all systems must: Readily achieve the desired decontamination factors, have good chemical and radiolytic stability, not use highly hazardous substances, not significantly increase the volume of feed or waste and lend themselves to easy engineering scale-up.
Date: September 1993
Creator: Horwitz, E. Philip; Dietz, Mark L.; Diamond, Herbert; Leonard, Ralph A. & Rogers, Robin D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of dry-solids-blend material source for grouts containing 106-AN waste: September 1990 progress report

Description: Stabilization/solidification (S/S) is the most widely used technology for the treatment and ultimate disposal of both radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes. Such technology is being utilized in a Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the disposal of various wastes, including 106-AN wastes, located on the Hanford Reservation. The WHC personnel have developed a grout formula for 106-AN disposal that is designed to meet stringent performance requirements. This formula consists of a dry-solids blend containing 40 wt % limestone, 28 wt % granulated blast furnace slag (BFS), 28 wt % ASTM Class F fly ash, and 4 wt % Type I-II-LA Portland cement. The blend is mixed with 106-AN waste at a ratio of 9 lb of dry-solids blend per gallon of waste. This report documents progress made to date on efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of WHC`s Grout Technology Program to assess the effects of the source of the dry-solids-blend materials on the resulting grout formula.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Gilliam, T. M.; Osborne, S. C.; Francis, C. L. & Scott, T. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Literature review of stabilization/solidification of volatile organic compounds and the implications for Hanford grouts

Description: A literature review was conducted on the stabilization/solidification of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Based on this literature, it is likely that the limestone-containing grout will not permanently immobilize VOCs and that no presently available additives can guarantee permanent immobilization. The Westinghouse hanford company grout may be fairly effective at retarding aqueous leaching of VOCs, and commercial additives can improve this performance. Significant VOC losses do occur during stabilization/solidification, and the high temperatures of the Westinghouse Hanford Company waste and grout should exacerbate this problem. In fact, these high temperatures raise doubts about the presence of VOCs in the double-shell tanks supernates.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Spence, R. D. & Osborne, S. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Clean option: An alternative strategy for Hanford Tank Waste Remediation. Volume 2, Detailed description of first example flowsheet

Description: Disposal of high-level tank wastes at the Hanford Site is currently envisioned to divide the waste between two principal waste forms: glass for the high-level waste (HLW) and grout for the low-level waste (LLW). The draft flow diagram shown in Figure 1.1 was developed as part of the current planning process for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), which is evaluating options for tank cleanup. The TWRS has been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to safely manage the Hanford tank wastes. It includes tank safety and waste disposal issues, as well as the waste pretreatment and waste minimization issues that are involved in the ``clean option`` discussed in this report. This report describes the results of a study led by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to determine if a more aggressive separations scheme could be devised which could mitigate concerns over the quantity of the HLW and the toxicity of the LLW produced by the reference system. This aggressive scheme, which would meet NRC Class A restrictions (10 CFR 61), would fit within the overall concept depicted in Figure 1.1; it would perform additional and/or modified operations in the areas identified as interim storage, pretreatment, and LLW concentration. Additional benefits of this scheme might result from using HLW and LLW disposal forms other than glass and grout, but such departures from the reference case are not included at this time. The evaluation of this aggressive separations scheme addressed institutional issues such as: radioactivity remaining in the Hanford Site LLW grout, volume of HLW glass that must be shipped offsite, and disposition of appropriate waste constituents to nonwaste forms.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Swanson, J. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

System design specification for the 1/4-scale tank and ancillary equipment

Description: The Fluid Dynamic Test Facility (FDTF) is located in the 336 Building at the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The FDTF will contain tanks that model the average internal diameter and height of a 3875 m{sup 3} (1-million-gal) double-shell tank at both 1/12- and 1/4-scale, as well as ancillary equipment required to store, mix, and transport waste simulants. Experiments to be conducted in this facility will include investigations of sludge mobilization, slurry uniformity, aerosol generation, sludge washing, and instrumentation development to support start-up of the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project. This facility will also be used to model concepts and mitigating strategies to be used in the resolution of tank safety issues and the retrieval of waste from watch-list tanks.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Bamberger, J. A.; Bates, J. M.; Waters, E. D. & Heimberger, D. T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Irradiation testing of an asphalt-based grout vault sealant

Description: In general, Nokorode 705M (a) showed only minimal effects from irradiation at the levels calculated for a 300-year lifetime, while in contact with the basic fluids expected in actual use. In no instance was loss of adhesion on concrete or loss of water tightness encountered in this testing. In contrast to simpler materials tested over 30 years ago, the Nokorode showed only small changes in density and virtually no changes in the mechanical properties examined. The much higher dose rate used to perform these tests within a reasonable time presumably amplified all irradiation effects, and nevertheless produced no changes which would make the material obviously unsuitable for its intended use. Although the effects observed were not examined in enough detail to determine the dominant degradation mechanism(s), the material is qualified from an engineering point of view.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Bunnell, L. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Grout Facilities Standby Plan

Description: This plan defines how the Grout Facilities will be deactivated to meet the intent of the recently renegotiated Tri-Party Agreement (TPA). The TPA calls for the use of the grout process as an emergency option only in the event that tank space is not available to resolve tank safety issues. The availability of new tanks is expected by 1997. Since a grout startup effort would take an estimated two years, a complete termination of the Grout Disposal Program is expected in December 1995. The former Tank Waste Remediation (TWRS) Strategy, adopted in 1988, called for the contents of Hanford`s 28 newer double-shell waste tanks to be separated into high-level radioactive material to be vitrified and disposed of in a geologic repository; low-level wastes were to be sent to the Grout Facility to be made into a cement-like-mixture and poured into underground vaults at Hanford for disposal. The waste in the 149 older single-shell tanks (SST) were to undergo further study and analysis before a disposal decision was made.
Date: September 29, 1994
Creator: Claghorn, R. D.; Kison, P. F.; Nunamaker, D. R. & Yoakum, A. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Review of grout particulate-emissions methodology. Letter report

Description: A model as been developed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (Program Release) to estimate the quantity of particulate aerosols that would become airborne during the pouring of grout into a storage vault. Information and equations derived from spill experiments were used in the model to determine release fractions. The letter report discusses the similarities and differences between the spill experiments and the grout vault operations, the applicability of the spill equations, and the use of particle depletion models to account for the residence time of particles in the grout vault.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Ballinger, M. Y.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Physical and hydraulic properties of sediments and engineered materials associated with grouted double-shell tank waste disposal at Hanford

Description: Numerical models are used to predict the fate of contaminants in the environment for durations of 10,000 years and more. At the Hanford Site, these models are being used to evaluate the potential health effects and environmental impacts associated with the disposal of double-shell tank waste in grouted vaults. These models require information on the properties of the earthen and manufactured materials that compose the vault system and its surroundings. This report documents the physical and hydraulic properties of the materials associated with burial of grouted double-shell tank waste at the Hanford Site.
Date: September 1, 1993
Creator: Rockhold, M. L.; Fayer, M. J. & Heller, P. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department