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Solidifications/stabilization treatability study of a mixed waste sludge

Description: The Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement with the US Environmental Protection Agency Region IV regarding mixed wastes from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) subject to the land disposal restriction provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This agreement required treatability studies of solidification/stabilization (S/S) on mixed wastes from the ORR. This paper reports the results of the cementitious S/S studies conducted on a waste water treatment sludge generated from biodenitrification and heavy metals precipitation. For the cementitious waste forms, the additives tested were Portland cement, ground granulated blast furnace slag, Class F fly ash, and perlite. The properties measured on the treated waste were density, free-standing liquid, unconfined compressive strength, and TCLP performance. Spiking up to 10,000, 10,000, and 4,400 mg/kg of nickel, lead, and cadmium, respectively, was conducted to test waste composition variability and the stabilization limitations of the binding agents. The results indicated that nickel, lead and cadmium were stabilized fairly well in the high pH hydroxide-carbonate- ``bug bones`` sludge, but also clearly confirmed the established stabilization potential of cementitious S/S for these RCRA metals.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Spence, R.D. & Stine, E.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Disposal of fluidized-bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence. Quarterly technical progress report, December 1994--February 1995

Description: Research continued on the disposal of fluidized-bed combustion products in underground mines in order to control acid mine drainage and ground subsidence. This quarter, the installation of a coal ash grout into an underground mine void was accomplished. A mixture of 10% portland cement was added to the ash. Problems arose with the clumping of the grout.
Date: March 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conversion of historic waste treatment process for production of an LDR and WIPP/WAC compliant TRU wasteform

Description: In support of the historic weapons production mission at the, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), several liquid waste treatment processes were designed, built and operated for treatment of plutonium-contaminated aqueous waste. Most of these @ processes ultimately resulted in the production of a cemented wasteform. One of these treatment processes was the Miscellaneous Aqueous Waste Handling and Solidification Process, commonly referred to as the Bottlebox process. Due to a lack of processing demand, Bottlebox operations were curtailed in late 1989. Starting in 1992, a treatment capability for stabilization of miscellaneous, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous, plutonium-nitrate solutions was identified. This treatment was required to address potentially unsafe storage conditions for these liquids. The treatment would produce a TRU wasteform. It thus became necessary to restart the Bottlebox process, but under vastly different conditions and constraints than existed prior to its curtailment. This paper provides a description of the historical Bottlebox process and process controls; and then describes, in detail, all of the process and process control changes that were implemented to convert the treatment system such that a Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and a Land Disposal Requirements (LDR) compliant wasteform would be produced. The rationale for imposition of LDRs on a TRU wasteform is discussed. In addition, this paper discusses the program changes implemented to meet modem criticality safety, Conduct of Operations, and Department of Energy Nuclear Facility restart requirements.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Dunn, R.P. & Wagner, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Admixture enhanced controlled low-strength material for direct underwater injection with minimal cross-contamination

Description: Commercially available admixtures have been developed for placing traditional concrete products under water. This paper evaluates adapting anti-washout admixture (AWA) and high range water reducing admixture (HRWRA) products to enhance controlled low-strength materials (CLSMs) for underwater placement. A simple experimental scale model (based on dynamic and geometric similitude) of typical grout pump emplacement equipment has been developed to determine the percentage of cementing material washed out. The objective of this study was to identify proportions of admixtures and underwater CLSM emplacement procedures which would minimize the cross-contamination of the displaced water while maintaining the advantages of CLSM. Since the displaced water from radioactively contaminated systems must be subsequently treated prior to release to the environment, the amount of cross-contamination is important for cases in which cementing material could form hard sludges in a water treatment facility and contaminate the in-place CLSM stabilization medium.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Hepworth, H.K.; Davidson, J.S. & Hooyman, J.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Grout and Glass Performance Maximizing the Loading of ORNL Tank Sludges

Description: Grouting and vitrification are currently two likely stabilization and solidification alternatives for radioactive and hazardous mixed wastes stored at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Grouting has been used to stabilize and solidify hazardous and low-level radioactive waste for decades. Vitrification has been developed as a high-level radioactive alternative for decades and has been under development recently as a mixed-waste alternative disposal technology.
Date: March 1, 1999
Creator: Burgess, M. W.; Mattus, A. J.; Spence, R. D. & Travis, J. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-98 Status Report

Description: The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.
Date: March 1, 1999
Creator: Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Rogers, A.Z.; Simmons, R.F. & Palethrope, S.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory stabilization/solidification of surrogate and actual mixed-waste sludge in glass and grout

Description: Grouting and vitrification are currently the most likely stabilization/solidification technologies for mixed wastes. Grouting has been used to stabilize and solidify hazardous and low-level waste for decades. Vitrification has long been developed as a high-level-waste alternative and has been under development recently as an alternative treatment technology for low-level mixed waste. Laboratory testing has been performed to develop grout and vitrification formulas for mixed-waste sludges currently stored in underground tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and to compare these waste forms. Envelopes, or operating windows, for both grout and soda-lime-silica glass formulations for a surrogate sludge were developed. One formulation within each envelope was selected for testing the sensitivity of performance to variations ({+-}10 wt%) in the waste form composition and variations in the surrogate sludge composition over the range previously characterized in the sludges. In addition, one sludge sample of an actual mixed-waste tank was obtained, a surrogate was developed for this sludge sample, and grout and glass samples were prepared and tested in the laboratory using both surrogate and the actual sludge. The sensitivity testing of a surrogate tank sludge in selected glass and grout formulations is discussed in this paper, along with the hot-cell testing of an actual tank sludge sample.
Date: March 3, 1998
Creator: Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.; Mattus, C.H. & Mattus, A.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Horizontal grout barrier project results of the latest testing

Description: Throughout United States Department of Energy (DOE) sites are situations where storage tanks and pits are leaking or have the potential to leak contamination into the soil. Subsequent leaching from rain and groundwater flow disperses the contamination far from the original site and, in some cases, into aquifers which serve as a drinking water source. Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation (FERMCO) at Fernald working with the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) and two subcontractors, is pursuing the goal of placing a barrier beneath the contamination to prevent this dispersion. The technology being developed is an in situ approach based on directional drilling and jet grouting techniques developed in the oil fields. The unique barrier techniques being developed depend on innovative tooling and special grouts to install a horizontal barrier underground without disturbing the contaminated soils above. The initial tool designs were tested in December 1992 and were encouraging enough that the DOE agreed to fund continued development. A second set of designs were tested in August 1994. The testing results were less than expected but did provide a number of lessons learned. This paper reports on the third set of tool designs and the results of testing these tools prior to the full demonstration project at Fernald.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Riedel, K.W.; Ridenour, D.E. & Walker, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gas generation from Hanford grout samples

Description: In an extension of our work on the radiolytic processes that occur in the waste tanks at the Hanford site, we studied the gas generation from grout samples that contained nuclear waste simulants. Grout is one option for the long-term storage of low-level nuclear waste solutions but the radiolytic effects on grout have not been thoroughly defined. In particular, the generation of potentially flammable and hazardous gases required quantification. A research team at Argonne examined this issue and found that the total amount of gases generated radiolytically from the WHC samples was an order of magnitude higher than predicted. This implies that novel pathways fro charge migration from the solid grout to the associated water are responsible for gas evolution. The grout samples produced hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and carbon monoxide as well as nitrogen and oxygen. Yields of each of these substances were determined for doses that are equivalent to about 80 years storage of the grout. Carbon monoxide, which was produced in 2% yield, is of particular importance because even small amounts may adversely affect catalytic conversion instrumentation that has been planned for installation in the storage vaults.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Jonah, C.D.; Kapoor, S.; Matheson, M.S.; Mulac, W.A. & Meisel, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gas Generation from Hanford Grout Samples : Final Report

Description: The radiolytic yields of hydrogen nitrogen, oxygen, nitrous oxide, and carbon monoxide from two batches of WHC-supplied samples of grouted simulated waste have been (gamma) irradiated at several dose rates (0.025, 0.63 and 130 krad/h for hydrogen and 130 krad/h for all other gases). In one batch, the liquid waste simulant that was added to the grout included the original components that were added to Tank 102-AP (labeled "virgin" waste.) The second batch included a similar liquid waste simulant that was preirradiated to 35 Mrad prior to incorporation into the grout. It is believed that the preirradiated samples more closely represent radioactive waste that was stored in the tank for several years. The lowest dose rate corresponds approximately to that expected in the grout; with the high dose rate, doses equivalent to about 85 years storage in grout vaults were achieved. Most of the results on the batch of virgin samples have been reported recently (Report ANL 93/42). Here we report the results from the batch of preirradiated grout samples and compare the results from the two batches. The radiolytic yields of hydrogen and nitrogen are lower in the preirradiated than in the virgin grout. On the other hand G(oxygen) is higher in the preirradiated samples: 0.078 vs. 0.026. The yield of nitrous oxide is essentially the same, G(nitrous oxide) = 0.010, in both. The yields measured from both batches are significantly higher than previously reported values. At 90 C similar amounts of hydrogen were generated thermally from both batches of grout, whereas the total amounts of nitrogen and nitrous oxide were larger for the preirradiated than for the virgin grout samples. At lower temperatures the rate of generation was hardly measurable. Mass spectrometric analysis suggests that NO is thermally (but not radiolytically) released from the grout samples.
Date: March 1994
Creator: Jonah, Charles D.; Kapoor, S.; Matheson, Max S.; Mulac, W. A. & Meisel, Dan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Laboratory testing of cement grouting of fractures in welded tuff

Description: Fractures in the rock mass surrounding a repository and its shafts, access drifts, emplacement rooms and holes, and exploratory or in-situ testing holes, may provide preferential flowpaths for the flow of groundwater or air, potentially containing radionuclides. Such cracks may have to be sealed. The likelihood that extensive or at least local grouting will be required as part of repository sealing has been noted in numerous publications addressing high level waste repository closing. The objective of this work is to determine the effectiveness of fracture sealing (grouting) in welded tuff. Experimental work includes measurement of intact and fracture permeability under various normal stresses and injection pressures. Grout is injected into the fractures. The effectiveness of grouting is evaluated in terms of grout penetration and permeability reduction, compared prior to and after grouting. Analysis of the results include the effect of normal stress, injection pressure, fracture roughness, grout rheology, grout bonding, and the radial extent of grout penetration. Laboratory experiments have been performed on seventeen tuff cylinders with three types of fractures: (1) tension induced cracks, (2) natural fractures, and (3) sawcuts. Prior to grouting, the hydraulic conductivity of the intact rock and of the fractures is measured under a range of normal stresses. The surface topography of the fracture is mapped, and the results are used to determine aperture distributions across the fractures. 72 refs., 76 figs., 25 tabs.
Date: March 1, 1991
Creator: Sharpe, C. J. & Daemen, J. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluating In Situ Treatment Technologies for Buried Mixed Waste Remediation at the INEEL

Description: Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes were buried at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area from 1952 to 1969. To begin the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process for the Subsurface Disposal Area, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) added the INEEL to its National Priorities List in 1989. DOE’s Office of Environmental Restoration is planning several CERCLA treatability studies of remedial technologies that will be evaluated for potential remediation of the buried waste in the Subsurface Disposal Area. This paper discusses the in situ treatability studies that will be performed, including in situ vitrification, in situ grouting, and in situ thermal desorption. The in situ treatability studies will be conducted on simulated and actual buried wastes at the INEEL in 1999 and 2000. Results from the treatability studies will provide substantial information on the feasibility, implementability, and cost of applying these technologies to the INEEL Subsurface Disposal Area. In addition, much of the treatability study data will be applicable to buried waste site remediation efforts across the DOE complex.
Date: March 1, 1999
Creator: Jorgensen, Douglas Kay; Nickelson, David Frank; Nickelson, Reva Anne; Farnsworth, Richard Kent & Jessmore, James Joseph
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

GLASS FEASIBILITY STUDY: VITRIFICATION OF OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY GUNITE WASTE USING IRON PHOSPHATE GLASS (U)

Description: This report describes the results of a glass feasibility study on vitrification of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Gunite waste into an Iron Phosphate glass. This glass feasibility study is part of a larger ORNL Gunite and Associated Tanks Treatability program (TTPSR1-6-WT-31). The treatability program explores different immobilization techniques of placing Gunite waste into a glass or grout form for long term storage. ORNL Gunite tanks contain waste that originated from years of various ORNL Research and Development programs. The available analyses of the Gunite Waste Tanks indicate, uranium and/or thorium as the dominant chemical constituent (50% +) and Cs{sup 137} the primary radionuclide. This information was utilized in determining a preliminary iron phosphate glass formulation. Chemical and physical properties: processing temperature, waste loading capability, chemical durability, density and redox were determined.
Date: March 1, 1996
Creator: Fellinger, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary assessment of blending Hanford tank wastes

Description: A parametric study of blending Hanford tank wastes identified possible benefits from blending wastes prior to immobilization as a high level or low level waste form. Track Radioactive Components data were used as the basis for the single-shell tank (SST) waste composition, while analytical data were used for the double-shell tank (DST) composition. Limiting components were determined using the existing feed criteria for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) and the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF). Results have shown that blending can significantly increase waste loading and that the baseline quantities of immobilized waste projected for the sludge-wash pretreatment case may have been drastically underestimated, because critical components were not considered. Alternatively, the results suggest further review of the grout feed specifications and the solubility of minor components in HWVP borosilicate glass. Future immobilized waste estimates might be decreased substantially upon a thorough review of the appropriate feed specifications.
Date: March 1, 1993
Creator: Geeting, J. G. H. & Kurath, D. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Gas generation from Hanford grout samples. Final report

Description: The radiolytic yields of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and CO from two batches of WHC-supplied samples of grouted simulated waste have been {gamma} irradiated at several dose rates (0.025, 0.63 and 130 krad/h for H{sub 2} and 130 krad/h for all other gases). In one batch, the liquid waste simulant that was added to the grout included the original components that were added to Tank 102-AP (labeled ``virgin``waste.) The second batch included a similar liquid waste simulant that was preirradiated to 35 Mrad prior to incorporation into the grout. It is believed that the preirradiated samples more closely represent radioactive waste that was stored in the tank for several years. The lowest dose rate corresponds approximately to that expected in the grout; with the high dose rate, doses equivalent to about 85 years storage in grout vaults were achieved. Most of the results on the batch of virgin samples have been reported recently (Report ANL 93/42). Here we report the results from the batch of preirradiated grout samples and compare the results from the two batches. The radiolytic yields of H{sub 2} and N{sub 2} are lower in the preirradiated than in the virgin grout. On the other hand G(O{sub 2}) is higher in the preirradiated samples: 0.078 vs. 0.026. The yield of nitrous oxide is essentially the same, G(N{sub 2}O) =0.010, in both. The yields measured from both batches are significantly higher than previously reported values. At 90{degrees}C similar amounts of H{sub 2} were generated thermally from both batches of grout, whereas the total amounts of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O were larger for the preirradiated than for the virgin grout samples. At lower temperatures the rate of generation was hardly measurable. Mass spectrometric analysis suggests that NO is thermally (but not radiolytically) released from ...
Date: March 1, 1994
Creator: Jonah, C. D.; Kapoor, S.: Matheson, M. S.; Mulac, W. A. & Meisel, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Design of the Waste Receiving and Processing Module 2A Facility

Description: Westinghouse Hanford Company has determined that a facility is required for the treatment of mixed low-level waste at the Hanford Site. The mission of that facility will be to receive, process/treat, package, certify, and ship the contact-handled, mixed low-level waste that must be handled by Hanford Site to permanent disposal. Preconceptual and conceptual design studies were performed by United Engineers and Constructors, and a conceptual design report was issued. This report presents a summary of the conceptual design for a facility that will meet the mission established.
Date: March 1, 1993
Creator: Lamberd, D. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Preliminary assessment of blending Hanford tank wastes

Description: A parametric study of blending Hanford tank wastes identified possible benefits from blending wastes prior to immobilization as a high level or low level waste form. Track Radioactive Components data were used as the basis for the single-shell tank (SST) waste composition, while analytical data were used for the double-shell tank (DST) composition. Limiting components were determined using the existing feed criteria for the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) and the Grout Treatment Facility (GTF). Results have shown that blending can significantly increase waste loading and that the baseline quantities of immobilized waste projected for the sludge-wash pretreatment case may have been drastically underestimated, because critical components were not considered. Alternatively, the results suggest further review of the grout feed specifications and the solubility of minor components in HWVP borosilicate glass. Future immobilized waste estimates might be decreased substantially upon a thorough review of the appropriate feed specifications.
Date: March 1, 1993
Creator: Geeting, J.G.H. & Kurath, D.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste sludge: Status Report

Description: This report describes the status of process development for pretreating Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge, of which [approximately] 3.3 [times] 10[sup 6] L is stored in Tanks 103-AW and 105-AW at the Hanford Site. The initial baseline process chosen for pretreating NCRW sludge is to dissolve the sludge in nitric acid and extract the -transuranic (MU) elements from the dissolved sludge solution with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl methyl phosphine oxide (CNWO). This process converts the NCRW sludge into a relatively large volume of low-level waste (LLW) to be disposed of as grout, leaving only a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) requiring vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP).
Date: March 1, 1993
Creator: Lumetta, G J & Swanson, J L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 3A

Description: Objective of this document is to provide descriptions of all WRAP 2A feed streams, including physical and chemical attributes, and describe the pathway that was used to select data for volume estimates. WRAP 2A is being designed for nonthermal treatment of contact-handled mixed low-level waste Category 1 and 3. It is based on immobilization and encapsulation treatment using grout or polymer.
Date: March 1, 1994
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department