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Ground-Water Temperature Data, Nevada Test Site and Vicinity, Nye, Clark, and Lincoln Counties, Nevada, 2000-2006.

Description: Ground-water temperature data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in wells at and in the vicinity of the Nevada Test Site during the years 2000–2006. Periodic ground-water temperatures were collected in 166 wells. In general, periodic ground-water temperatures were measured annually in each well at 5 and 55 feet below the water surface. Ground-water temperature profiles were collected in 73 wells. Temperatures were measured at multiple depths below the water surface to produce these profiles. Databases were constructed to present the ground-water temperature data.
Date: August 7, 2007
Creator: Reiner, Steven R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Update to the Ground-Water Withdrawals Database for the Death Valley REgional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California, 1913-2003

Description: Ground-water withdrawal estimates from 1913 through 2003 for the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system are compiled in an electronic database to support a regional, three-dimensional, transient ground-water flow model. This database updates a previously published database that compiled estimates of ground-water withdrawals for 1913–1998. The same methodology is used to construct each database. Primary differences between the 2 databases are an additional 5 years of ground-water withdrawal data, well locations in the updated database are restricted to Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model boundary, and application rates are from 0 to 1.5 feet per year lower than original estimates. The lower application rates result from revised estimates of crop consumptive use, which are based on updated estimates of potential evapotranspiration. In 2003, about 55,700 acre-feet of ground water was pumped in the DVRFS, of which 69 percent was used for irrigation, 13 percent for domestic, and 18 percent for public supply, commercial, and mining activities.
Date: July 2, 2008
Creator: Moreo, Michael T. & Justet, and Leigh
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California

Description: This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.
Date: May 16, 2006
Creator: Blainey, Joan B. & Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Database of Ground-Water Levels in the Vicinity of Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada 1957-2005.

Description: More than 1,200 water-level measurements from 1957 to 2005 in the Rainier Mesa area of the Nevada Test Site were quality assured and analyzed. Water levels were measured from 50 discrete intervals within 18 boreholes and from 4 tunnel sites. An interpretive database was constructed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in the Rainier Mesa area. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes hydrograph narratives that describe the water-level history of each well.
Date: August 15, 2006
Creator: Fenelon, Joseph M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Head Observation Organizer (HObO)

Description: The Head Observation Organizer, HObO, is a computer program that stores and manages measured ground-water levels. HObO was developed to help ground-water modelers compile, manage, and document water-level data needed to calibrate ground-water models. Well-construction and water-level data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Database (NWIS) easily can be imported into HObO from the NWIS web site (NWISWeb). The water-level data can be flagged to determine which data will be included in the calibration data set. The utility program HObO_NWISWeb was developed to simplify the down loading of well and water-level data from NWISWeb. An ArcGIS NWISWeb Extension was developed to retrieve site information from NWISWeb. A tutorial is presented showing the basic elements of HObO.
Date: March 6, 2008
Creator: Predmore, Steven
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Problems with Applying Topographically Driven Flow to Genesis of the Upper Mississippi Valley Zinc-Lead District and to Fluid Flow in the Illinois Basin

Description: A report about how topographically driven ground-water flow and other processes that involve dewatering of basins fail to account for the temperatures indicated by fluid inclusion and sulfur isotope studies in the Upper Mississippi Valley zinc-lead district on the northern edge of the Illinois Basin.
Date: 1995
Creator: Spirakis, Charles S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Availability and Chemical Quality of Ground Water in the Crystal River and Cattle Creek Drainage Basins near Glenwood Springs, West-Central Colorado

Description: From introduction: This report presents the results of an investigation of the ground-water resources of the Crystal River and Cattle Creek drainage basins...The purpose of the investigation was to describe the geologic units, the aquifers and their characteristics, and the availability and chemical quality of ground water in the study area.
Date: 1976
Creator: Brogden, Robert E. & Giles, T. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Artificial-Recharge Experiments and Operations on the Southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico

Description: Abstract: Experiments using highly turbid water from playa lakes for injection into the Ogallala Formation have resulted in greatly decreased yield of the recharge wells. Recharge of ground or surface water of good quality has indicated, however, that injection through wells in an effective method of recharging the aquifer. Water that is slightly turbid can be successfully injected for a period of time, but generally results in constantly declining yields and capacity for recharge. Redevelopment through pumping and surging significantly prolongs the life of recharge wells under some conditions. Surface spreading is little practiced on the High Plains, but locally may be a feasible means of artificial recharge.
Date: May 1973
Creator: Brown, Richmond F. & Signor, Donald C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Ground Water Level Measurements in Selected Boreholes Near the Site of the Proposed Repository

Description: The Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies (HRC) at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) acquired quarterly and continuous data on water levels from approximately 26 boreholes that comprise a periodic monitoring network (Table 1) between October 2003 and September 2007. During this period we continued to observe and analyze short and long-term ground water level trends in periodically monitored boreholes. In this report we summarize and discuss four key findings derived from analysis of water level data acquired during this period: 1. Rapid ground water level rise after storm events in Forty Mile Canyon; 2. Seismically-induced ground water level fluctuations; 3. A sample of synoptic observations and barometric influences on short term fluctuations; and 4. Long term ground water level trends observed from mid-2001 through late-2005.
Date: November 29, 2007
Creator: Page, H. Scott
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Waterlogging in an Alluvial Aquifer near Lake Minnequa, Pueblo, Colorado

Description: Abstract: The Lake Minnequa area, located immediately south of the Arkansas River, is mantled with as much as 46 feet (14 meters) of alluvium covering bedrock of Pierre Shale and Niobrara Formation. Surface water enters the area by the Minnequa Canal and the St. Charles Flood Ditch. The water is stored in Lake Minnequa and other reservoirs. Seepage from St. Charles Reservoirs No. 2 and No. 3 is the major source of water to the alluvial aquifer. The depth of the water table ranges from 0 to 40 feet (0 to 12.2 meters). A 0.5-square-mile (1.3-square-kilometers) area immediately south of Lake Minnequa has a water table less than 6 feet (1.8 meters) below land surface. Lake Minnequa is the principal cause of the shallow water table and resulting waterlogged soil. The bedrock hill east of Lake Minnequa and ground-water flow also contribute to the problem. To eliminate the waterlogging problem, the water table would have to be at least 6 feet (1.8 meters) below land surface. Possible alternatives for eliminating the problem include lowering the water, level in Lake Minnequa, placing a network of dewaterinq wells, or constructing a drainage system in the waterlogged area.
Date: July 1976
Creator: Emmons, Patrick J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

A Model for Flow Through a Glacial Outwash Aquifer in Southeast Franklin County, Ohio

Description: Abstract: A glacial outwash aquifer of about 70 square miles in the Scioto River valley southeast of Columbus, Ohio, was modeled as a potentially major source of water. The model was constructed from available hydrologic data: Records of precipitation, well hydrographs, well logs, two ground-water level surveys, and analyses of six aquifer tests. Utilizing this array of data, water levels determined from a series of steady-state simulations of different hydraulic conductivity distributions were calibrated against measured (December 1977) ground-water levels. The simulations that provided the best matches used two hydraulic conductivity distributions: One was an areally varying hydraulic conductivity distribution; the other an areally uniform hydraulic conductivity (40 feet per day) distribution. After these more probable hydraulic conductivity distributions were found, they were utilized in steady state maximal pumping simulations. The maximal well-field yield of these simulations was 20.5 million gallons per day for the areally varying hydraulic conductivity distribution, and 11.3 million gallons per day for the areally uniform hydraulic conductivity. Sensitivity of well yield to changes in well position and streambed leakance changes was investigated also.
Date: November 1980
Creator: Weiss, Emanual J. & Razem, Allan C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Potential Radiological Doses From Groundwater Contaminated By The Saltstone Disposal Facility

Description: Assessments of radiological dose from usage of groundwater potentially contaminated by the Saltstone Disposal Facility (Z-Area) were made for a hypothetical future resident farmer. These assessments were made using the routine aqueous release model LADTAP XL (C), which is the model used for demonstrating liquid pathway dose compliance at SRS. The dose factors used in LADTAP XL (C) are those specified by the Department of Energy.
Date: February 14, 2005
Creator: GERALD, JANNIK
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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