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UC Berkeley Seismic Guidelines, Appendix II: Ground Motion TimeHistories for the UC Berkeley Campus

Description: Three sets of ten time histories each were developed to represent the ground motions for each of the three return periods. All of the time histories are provided as pairs of fault-normal and fault-parallel components. The ground motion time histories are provided in two forms: unmodified, and spectrally modified to match the probabilistic response spectra. The unmodified time histories can be scaled to match the probabilistic response spectra at a specified period, such as the first mode period of the structure being analyzed, while leaving the shape of the response spectrum unmodified. This approach preserves the particular characteristics of the individual time history, together with the peaks and troughs of its response spectrum. These individual characteristics are modified in the spectrally matched time histories, resulting in a suite of ten time histories (for a given return period) that all have the same response spectrum for a given component (fault normal or fault parallel) that follows the smooth shape of the probabilistic response spectrum.
Date: June 3, 2003
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

UC Berkeley Seismic Guidelines, Appendix II: Ground Motion Time Histories for the UC Berkeley Campus

Description: Three sets of ten time histories each were developed to represent the ground motions for each of the three return periods. All of the time histories are provided as pairs of fault-normal and fault-parallel components. The ground motion time histories are provided in two forms: unmodified, and spectrally modified to match the probabilistic response spectra. The unmodified time histories can be scaled to match the probabilistic response spectra at a specified period, such as the first mode period of the structure being analyzed, while leaving the shape of the response spectrum unmodified. This approach preserves the particular characteristics of the individual time history, together with the peaks and troughs of its response spectrum. These individual characteristics are modified in the spectrally matched time histories, resulting in a suite of ten time histories (for a given return period) that all have the same response spectrum for a given component (fault normal or fault parallel) that follows the smooth shape of the probabilistic response spectrum.
Date: June 3, 2003
Creator: Authors, Various
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of Nonlinear Model Results Using Modified Recorded and Synthetic Ground Motions

Description: A study has been performed that compares results of nonlinear model runs using two sets of earthquake ground motion time histories that have been modified to fit the same design response spectra. The time histories include applicable modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories and synthetic ground motion time histories. The modified recorded earthquake ground motion time histories are modified from time history records that are selected based on consistent magnitude and distance. The synthetic ground motion time histories are generated using appropriate Fourier amplitude spectrums, Arias intensity, and drift correction. All of the time history modification is performed using the same algorithm to fit the design response spectra. The study provides data to demonstrate that properly managed synthetic ground motion time histories are reasonable for use in nonlinear seismic analysis.
Date: November 1, 2011
Creator: Spears, Robert E. & Wilkins, J. Kevin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Response of Long-Span Bridges to Low Frequency, Near-Fault Earthquake Ground Motions

Description: Historical seismic hazard characterizations did not include earthquake ground motion waveforms at frequencies below approximately 0.2 Hz (5 seconds period). This resulted from limitations in early strong motion instrumentation and signal processing techniques, a lack of measurements in the near-field of major earthquakes and therefore no observational awareness, and a delayed understanding in the engineering community of the potential significance of these types of motions. In recent years, there is a growing recognition of the relevance of near-fault, low frequency motions, particularly for long-period structures such as large bridges. This paper describes a computationally based study of the effects of low frequency (long-period) near-fault motions on long-span bridge response. The importance of inclusion of these types of motions for long span cable supported bridges is demonstrated using actual measured broad-band, near-fault motions from large earthquakes.
Date: February 27, 2009
Creator: McCallen, David; Astaneh-Asl, A.; Larsen, S.C. & Hutchings, Larry
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Analysis of source spectra, attenuation, and site effects from central and eastern United States earthquakes

Description: This report describes the results from three studies of source spectra, attenuation, and site effects of central and eastern United States earthquakes. In the first study source parameter estimates taken from 27 previous studies were combined to test the assumption that the earthquake stress drop is roughly a constant, independent of earthquake size. 200 estimates of stress drop and seismic moment from eastern North American earthquakes were combined. It was found that the estimated stress drop from the 27 studies increases approximately as the square-root of the seismic moment, from about 3 bars at 10{sup 20} dyne-cm to 690 bars at 10{sup 25} dyne-cm. These results do not support the assumption of a constant stress drop when estimating ground motion parameters from eastern North American earthquakes. In the second study, broadband seismograms recorded by the United States National Seismograph Network and cooperating stations have been analysed to determine Q{sub Lg} as a function of frequency in five regions: the northeastern US, southeastern US, central US, northern Basin and Range, and California and western Nevada. In the third study, using spectral analysis, estimates have been made for the anelastic attenuation of four regional phases, and estimates have been made for the source parameters of 27 earthquakes, including the M{sub b} 5.6, 14 April, 1995, West Texas earthquake.
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Lindley, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Validation of a ground motion synthesis and prediction methodology for the 1988, M=6.0, Saguenay Earthquake

Description: We model the 1988, M=6.0, Saguenay earthquake. We utilize an approach that has been developed to predict strong ground motion. this approach involves developing a set of rupture scenarios based upon bounds on rupture parameters. rupture parameters include rupture geometry, hypocenter, rupture roughness, rupture velocity, healing velocity (rise times), slip distribution, asperity size and location, and slip vector. Scenario here refers to specific values of these parameters for an hypothesized earthquake. Synthetic strong ground motion are then generated for each rupture scenario. A sufficient number of scenarios are run to span the variability in strong ground motion due to the source uncertainties. By having a suite of rupture scenarios of hazardous earthquakes for a fixed magnitude and identifying the hazard to the site from the one standard deviation value of engineering parameters we have introduced a probabilistic component to the deterministic hazard calculation, For this study we developed bounds on rupture scenarios from previous research on this earthquake. The time history closest to the observed ground motion was selected as a model for the Saguenay earthquake.
Date: January 1, 1998
Creator: Hutchings, L.; Jarpe, S.; Kasameyer, P. & Foxall, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Seismic studies of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge

Description: Computational simulation plays a central role in the engineering analysis and design of major bridge structures and accurate simulations are essential for the development of earthquake resistant and economical structural designs. This paper describes new methodologies and computational tools which have recently been developed for simulating earthquake ground motions and the seismic response of cable supported bridges. The simulation tools are described and an example application for an important long-span suspension bridge is demonstrated. The application portion of the study has particular focus on the potential damaging effects of long period displacement pulses and permanent ground displacements which can occur when a bridge is located in the near-field of a major earthquake fault.
Date: August 17, 1999
Creator: Astaneh-Asl, A; Larsen, S & McCallen, D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Re-alignment: It is the tunnel floor which moves, isn`t it?

Description: It is shown that on the months to years time scale, accelerator tunnels built in compacted geological strata exhibit a movement of the floor systematic (unidirectional) in each point. Attempts to characterize the movement through one global number (a <rms> deviation) based on a random model are conceptionally wrong and can only lead to erroneous design decisions for future accelerators. In the extrapolation limit, differences are especially pronounced for differential movements in the case of short (days) time spans, and for accumulated movements in the case of long (years) time spans.
Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Pitthan, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Utilization of near-source video and ground motion in the assessment of seismic source functions from mining explosions

Description: Constraint of the operative physical processes in the source region of mining explosions and the linkage to the generation of seismic waveforms provides the opportunity for controlling ground motion. Development of these physical models can also be used in conjunction with the ground motion data as diagnostics of blasting efficiency. In order to properly address the multi-dimensional aspect of data sets designed to constrain these sources, we are investigating a number of modem visualization tools that have only recently become available with new, high-speed graphical computers that can utilize relatively large data sets. The data sets that are combined in the study of mining explosion sources include near-source ground motion acceleration and velocity records, velocity of detonation measurements in each explosive hole, high speed film, video and shot design information.
Date: April 1, 1995
Creator: Stump, B.W. & Anderson, D.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BOTE model: an analytic approach to predicting ground motion phenomena resulting from underground nuclear explosions

Description: An analytical model (the BOTE model) based upon a superposition of the limiting forms for the outgoing stress wave (i.e., a strong shock at early times decaying to a simple acoustic wave at later times) is presented as a means to describe the groundmotion phenomena resulting from underground nuclear explosions. Taking into account the effects of both the porosity and the water content of the surrounding medium, the BOTE model provides good agreement with both calculated and experimental data for times ranging from tens of microseconds to tens of milliseconds, and for distances ranging out to 350 ft/kt . (auth)
Date: November 1, 1973
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ground Motion Studies at NSLS II

Description: In this study, an array of vibration measurements at the undisturbed NSLS II site has been performed in order to establish the 'green-field' vibration environment and its spectral characteristics. The interaction of the green-field vibration environment with the NSLS II accelerator structure and the quantification of the storage ring vibration, both in terms of amplitude and spectral content have been assessed through a state-of-the-art wave propagation and scattering analysis. This paper focuses on the wave propagation and scattering aspect as well as on the filtering effects of accelerator structural parameters.
Date: June 23, 2008
Creator: Simos,N.; Fallier, M. & Amick, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Dynamic Response of the Suspension Spans of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge

Description: The dynamic response of the suspension spans of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge (SFOBB) have been numerically modeled in a case-study to investigate the effects of long-period, near-field ground motions on flexible suspension bridges. The structural simulation model used in the study was developed as a special purpose computer program tailored to efficiently simulate the nonlinear response of cable supported bridges. The simulation model includes a number of special element technologies and solution algorithms that enable efficient nonlinear analysis of suspension bridges. The ground motions used in the study were site specific synthetic records for a Mw=7.25 earthquake along the Hayward fault at 12-15 km distant, and actual measured near-field records from the Izmit Turkey (1999) and Chi-Chi Taiwan (1999) earthquakes. These records include near- and far-field broad-band motions for three components. The results of the numerical simulations indicate that low frequency waveforms associated with near-field motions can place a significant demand on the structural systems of suspension bridges, and must be accounted for in suspension bridge analysis and design.
Date: November 3, 2005
Creator: McCallen, D; Astaneh-Asl, A; Larsen, S & Hutchings, L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

LLNL-Generated Content for the California Academy of Sciences, Morrison Planetarium Full-Dome Show: Earthquake

Description: The California Academy of Sciences (CAS) Morrison Planetarium is producing a 'full-dome' planetarium show on earthquakes and asked LLNL to produce content for the show. Specifically the show features numerical ground motion simulations of the M 7.9 1906 San Francisco and a possible future M 7.05 Hayward fault scenario earthquake. The show also features concepts of plate tectonics and mantle convection using images from LLNL's G3D global seismic tomography. This document describes the data that was provided to the CAS in support of production of the 'Earthquake' show. The CAS is located in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco and hosts over 1.6 million visitors. The Morrison Planetarium, within the CAS, is the largest all digital planetarium in the world. It features a 75-foot diameter spherical section projection screen tilted at a 30-degree angle. Six projectors cover the entire field of view and give a three-dimensional immersive experience. CAS shows strive to use scientifically accurate digital data in their productions. The show, entitled simply 'Earthquake', will debut on 26 May 2012. They are working on graphics and animations based on the same data sets for display on LLNL powerwalls and flat-screens as well as for public release.
Date: January 23, 2012
Creator: Rodgers, A J; Petersson, N A; Morency, C E; Simmons, N A & Sjogreen, B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Issues of Stability and Ground Motion in ILC

Description: Stability of International Linear Collider is determined by the stability of the site, additional noises of beamline component, energy and kicker jitter, and performance of train-to-train and intratrain feedback. Stability goals in terms of the beam jitter at the end of the linac, in BDS and at the IP are discussed in this paper, and translated to stability goals for the site and for component jitter. Present status of stability studies is reviewed and feasibility of achieving the stability goals is discussed.
Date: February 3, 2006
Creator: Seryi, Andrei; Hendrickson, Linda; White, Glen & /SLAC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Lessons Learned- The Use of Formal Expert Elicitation in Probablistic Seismic Hazard

Description: Probabilistic seismic hazard analyses provide the opportunity, indeed the requirement, to quantify the uncertainties in important inputs to the analysis. The locations of future earthquakes, their recurrence rates and maximum size, and the ground motions that will result at a site of interest are all quantities that require careful consideration because they are uncertain. The earliest PSHA models [Cornell, 1968] provided solely for the randomness or aleatory variability in these quantities. The most sophisticated seismic hazard models today, which include quantified uncertainties, are merely more realistic representations of this basic aleatory model. All attempts to quantify uncertainties require expert judgment. Further, all uncertainty models should endeavor to consider the range of views of the larger technical community at the time the hazard analysis is conducted. In some cases, especially for large projects under regulatory review, formal structured methods for eliciting expert judgments have been employed. Experience has shown that certain key elements are required for these assessments to be successful, including: (1) experts should be trained in probability theory, uncertainty quantification, and ways to avoid common cognitive biases; (2) comprehensive and user-friendly databases should be provided to the experts; (3) experts should be required to evaluate all potentially credible hypotheses; (4) workshops and other interactions among the experts and proponents of published viewpoints should be encouraged; (5) elicitations are best conducted in individual interview sessions; (6) feedback should be provided to the experts to give them insight into the significance of alternative assessments to the hazard results; and (7) complete documentation should include the technical basis for all assessments. Case histories are given from seismic hazard analyses in Europe, western North America, and the stable continental region of the United States.
Date: May 10, 2006
Creator: Coppersmith, K.J.; Perman, R.C. & Youngs, R.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

QUANTIFYING UNCERTAINTIES IN GROUND MOTION SIMULATIONS FOR SCENARIO EARTHQUAKES ON THE HAYWARD-RODGERS CREEK FAULT SYSTEM USING THE USGS 3D VELOCITY MODEL AND REALISTIC PSEUDODYNAMIC RUPTURE MODELS

Description: This project seeks to compute ground motions for large (M&gt;6.5) scenario earthquakes on the Hayward Fault using realistic pseudodynamic ruptures, the USGS three-dimensional (3D) velocity model and anelastic finite difference simulations on parallel computers. We will attempt to bound ground motions by performing simulations with suites of stochastic rupture models for a given scenario on a given fault segment. The outcome of this effort will provide the average, spread and range of ground motions that can be expected from likely large earthquake scenarios. The resulting ground motions will be based on first-principles calculations and include the effects of slip heterogeneity, fault geometry and directivity, however, they will be band-limited to relatively low-frequency (&lt; 1 Hz).
Date: January 9, 2008
Creator: Rodgers, A & Xie, X
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department