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Research and Development of Information on Geothermal Direct Heat Application Projects

Description: This is the first annual report of ICF's geothermal R&D project for the Department of Energy's Idaho Operations Office. The overall objective of this project is to compile, analyze, and report on data from geothermal direct heat application projects. Ultimately, this research should convey the information developed through DOE's and Program Opportunity Notice (PON) activities as well as through other pioneering geothermal direct heat application projects to audiences which can use the early results in new, independent initiatives. A key audience is potential geothermal investors.
Date: October 1, 1981
Creator: Hederman, William F., Jr. & Cohen, Laura A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal Heat Pumps as a Cost Saving and Capital Renewal Too!

Description: An independent evaluation of the Fort Polk, Louisiana energy savings performance contract (ESPC) has verified the financial value of geothermal heat pump (GHP)-centered ESPCS to the federal government. The Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) has responded by issuing an RFP for the "National GHP-Technology-Specific Super ESPC Procurement." Federal agency sites anywhere in the nation will be able to implement GHP-centered ESPC projects as delivery orders against the awarded contracts.
Date: November 6, 1998
Creator: Hughes, P.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal Energy: Residential Space Heating

Description: The purpose of this study, which was carried out under the auspices of the DGRST, was to determine the best way to use geothermal hot water for residential space heating. It quickly became apparent that the type of heating apparatus used in the housing units was most important and that heat pumps could be a valuable asset, making it possible to extract even more geothermal heat and thus substantially improve the cost benefit of the systems. Many factors play a significant role in this problem. Therefore, after a first stage devoted to analyzing the problem through a manual method which proved quite useful, the systematic consideration of all important aspects led us to use a computer to optimize solutions and process a large number of cases. The software used for this general study can also be used to work out particular cases: it is now available to any interested party through DGRST. This program makes it possible to: (1) take climatic conditions into account in a very detailed manner, including temperatures as well as insolation. 864 cases corresponding to 36 typical days divided into 24 hours each were chosen to represent the heating season. They make it possible to define the heating needs of any type of housing unit. (2) simulate and analyze the behavior in practice of a geothermal heating system when heat is extracted from the well by a simple heat exchanger. This simulation makes it possible to evaluate the respective qualities of various types of heating apparatus which can be used in homes. It also makes it possible to define the best control systems for the central system and substations and to assess quite accurately the presence of terminal controls, such as radiators with thermostatically controlled valves. (3) determine to what extent the addition of a heat ...
Date: March 1, 1977
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geotheral heating facilities of United Church of Christ (Congregational Church)

Description: Based on the assumptions made in this study, a geothermal system for the Congregational Church is not economically feasible at this time. A retrofit of the church for geothermal would result in a capital cost of $37,600 including the geothermal well. When this figure is considered in conjunction with the $1892 first-year savings (present fuel cost minus geothermal system O and M cost) and inflation over a 20-year period, a simple payback of 12 years results. In addition, an internal rate of return figure of 8.7 percent was generated. This indicates that the project would have to be financed at less than 9 percent to be economically feasible over a 20-year period.
Date: July 1, 1981
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Conceptual design study of geothermal district heating of a thirty-house subdivision in Elko, Nevada, using existing water-distribution systems, Phase III. Final technical report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

Description: A conceptual design study for district heating of a 30-home subdivision located near the southeast extremity of the city of Elko, Nevada is presented. While a specific residential community was used in the study, the overall approach and methodologies are believed to be generally applicable for a large number of communities where low temperature geothermal fluid is available. The proposed district heating system utilizes moderate temperature, clean domestic water and existing community culinary water supply lines. The culinary water supply is heated by a moderate temperature geothermal source using a single heat exchanger at entry to the subdivision. The heated culinary water is then pumped to the houses in the community where energy is extracted by means of a water supplied heat pump. The use of heat pumps at the individual houses allows economic heating to result from supply of relatively cool water to the community, and this precludes the necessity of supplying objectionably hot water for normal household consumption use. Each heat pump unit is isolated from the consumptive water flow such that contamination of the water supply is avoided. The community water delivery system is modified to allow recirculation within the community, and very little rework of existing water lines is required. The entire system coefficient of performance (COP) for a typical year of heating is 3.36, exclusive of well pumping energy.
Date: September 30, 1980
Creator: Pitts, D.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, July--September 1997

Description: This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R and D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the fourth quarter of FY-97 (July--September 1997). It describes 213 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include requests for general information including maps, geothermal heat pumps, resource and well data, space heating and cooling, greenhouses, acquaculture, equipment, district heating, resorts and spas, and industrial applications. Research activities include the completion of a Comprehensive Greenhouse Developer Package. Work accomplished on the revision of the Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook are discussed. Outreach activities include the publication of the Quarterly Bulletin (Vol. 18, No. 3), dissemination of information mainly through mailings of publications, geothermal library acquisition and use, participation in workshops, short courses, and technical meetings by the staff, and progress monitor reports on geothermal activities.
Date: October 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Heating facilities: Klamath Lutheran Church, Klamath Falls, Oregon

Description: The Klamath Lutheran Church is a masonry structure with cathedral ceiling containing approximately 5800 sq ft of floor area. This building is currently heated by two duct furnaces and a unit heater all of which are gas fired. An Educational Wing of approximately 6300 sq ft was added in 1958. This building, containing 2 assembly rooms and a number of classrooms is of uninsulated frame construction, with extensive glass area. A gas-fired boiler supplying finned tube radiators currently heats this wing. Four specific options for displacing all or part of the heating duty with geothermal were examined. These options are: case 1 - drilling a production and injection well on the property and using the resultant hot water (180/sup 0/F) to heat the entire facility; case 3 - using effluent from the Klamath Union High School to heat the entire facility; no well drilling required; case 2 - using effluent from the Klamath Union High School to heat only the church building; the present gas boiler would heat the Educational Wing; and case 4 - drilling a production and injection well on the property and using the resulting water (70/sup 0/F) to supply a water-to-water heat pump. Of the four cases examined, case 3 (heating of both the church building and educational wing with effluent from the Klamath Union High School) seems to offer the greatest potential and earliest simple payback period. (MHR)
Date: August 1, 1980
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal heating systems for greenhouses

Description: Ways to utilize low-temperature geothermally heated water for a flow-through system are presented. The geothermal energy used for this system is the waste heat discharged from space heating 500,000 square feet of floor space at Oregon Institute of Technology with geothermal water pumped directly from the campus wells. The information collected and analyzed is from data developed from operating a greenhouse on the Oregon Institute of Technology campus from December 1979 to April 1980. Methods for calculating heating requirements of greenhouses using geothermal energy were developed from the analyses of the data obtained. (MHR)
Date: August 12, 1980
Creator: Silva, J.F. & Johnson, W.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Optimization of design and control strategies for geothermal space heating systems. Final report

Description: The efficient design and operation of geothermal space heating systems requires careful analysis and departure from normal design practices. Since geothermal source temperatures are much lower than either fossil fuel or electrical source temperatures, the temperature of the delivered energy becomes more critical. Also, since the geothermal water is rejected after heat exchange, it is necessary to extract all of the energy that is practical in one pass; there is no second change for energy recovery. The present work examines several heating system configurations and describes the desired design and control characteristics for operation on geothermal sources. Specific design methods are outlined as well as several generalized guidelines that should significantly improve the operation of any geothermally heated system.
Date: July 1, 1984
Creator: Batdorf, J.A. & Simmons, G.M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

State-coupled direct heat program, western states

Description: DGE's objective in this project is to facilitate discovery, assessment and development of low temperature geothermal resources in the US. One strategy for reaching this objective is the initiation with selected states of cooperative programs. The objectives of these state cooperative programs are: (1) to extend the inventory of geothermal resources in the state to include the low temperature reservoirs most suitable for direct heat applications; and (2) to stimulate reservoir confirmation studies at sites with an apparent but unquantified potential for direct heat application development.
Date: September 1, 1977
Creator: Wright, Phillip M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Water and Energy Sustainability: A Balance of Government Action and Industry Innovation

Description: By completing the tasks and subtasks of the project, the Ground Water Protection Council (GWPC) through its state regulatory agency members and oil and gas industry partners, will bring attention to water quality and quantity issues and make progress toward water and energy sustainability though enhanced water protection and conservation thus enhancing the viability of the domestic fossil fuel industry. The project contains 4 major independent Tasks. Task 1 - Work Plan: Water-Energy Sustainability: A Symposium on Resource Viability. Task 2 - Work Plan: A Regional Assessment of Water and Energy Sustainability. Task 3 - Work Plan: Risk Based Data Management System-Water Water and Energy Module. Task 4 - Work Plan: Identification and Assessment of States Regulatory Programs Regarding Geothermal Heating and Cooling Systems. Each task has a specific scope (details given).
Date: December 31, 2009
Creator: Grunewald, Ben
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, July 1996--September 1996. Federal Assistance Program

Description: This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center at Oregon Institute of Technology for the fourth quarter of FY-96. It describes 152 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with geothermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, economics and resources. Research activities are summarized on greenhouse peaking. Outreach activities include the publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, geothermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.
Date: November 1, 1996
Creator: Lienau, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal resources of Montana

Description: The Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology has updated its inventory of low and moderate temperature resources for the state and has assisted the Oregon Institute of Technology - GeoHeat Center and the University of Utah Research Institute in prioritizing and collocating important geothermal resource areas. The database compiled for this assessment contains information on location, flow, water chemistry, and estimated reservoir temperatures for 267 geothermal well and springs in Montana. For this assessment, the minimum temperature for low-temperature resource is defined as 10{degree} C above the mean annual air temperature at the surface. The maximum temperature for a moderate-temperature resource is defined as greater than 50{degree} C. Approximately 12% of the wells and springs in the database have temperatures above 50{degree} C, 17% are between 30{degree} and 50{degree} C, 29% are between 20{degree} and 30{degree}C, and 42% are between 10{degree} and 20{degree} C. Low and moderate temperature wells and springs can be found in nearly all areas of Montana, but most are in the western third of the state. Information sources for the current database include the MBMG Ground Water Information Center, the USGS statewide database, the USGS GEOTHERM database, and new information collected as part of this program. Five areas of Montana were identified for consideration in future investigations of geothermal development. The areas identified are those near Bozeman, Ennis, Butte, Boulder, and Camas Prairie. These areas were chosen based on the potential of the resource and its proximity to population centers.
Date: June 1, 1994
Creator: Metesh, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geothermal direct-heat utilization assistance. Quarterly project progress report, January--March 1996

Description: This report summarizes geothermal technical assistance, R&D, and technology transfer activities of the Geo-Heat Center. It describes 95 contacts with parties during this period related to technical assistance with goethermal direct heat projects. Areas dealt with include geothermal heat pumps, space heating, greenhouses, aquaculture, equipment, economics, and resources. Research activities are summarized on geothermal district heating system cost evaluation and silica waste utilization project. Outreach activities include publication of a geothermal direct use Bulletin, dissemination of information, goethermal library, technical papers and seminars, and progress monitor reports on geothermal resources and utilization.
Date: May 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Low-temperature resource assessment program. Final report

Description: The US Department of Energy - Geothermal Division (DOE/GD) recently sponsored the Low-Temperature Resource Assessment project to update the inventory of the nation`s low- and moderate-temperature geothermal resources and to encourage development of these resources. A database of 8,977 thermal wells and springs that are in the temperature range of 20{degrees}C to 150{degrees}C has been compiled for ten western states, an impressive increase of 82% compared to the previous assessments. The database includes location, descriptive data, physical parameters, water chemistry and references for sources of data. Computer-generated maps are also available for each state. State Teams have identified 48 high-priority areas for near-term comprehensive resource studies and development. Resources with temperatures greater than 50{degrees}C located within 8 km of a population center were identified for 271 collocated cities. Geothermal energy cost evaluation software has been developed to quickly identify the cost of geothermally supplied heat to these areas in a fashion similar to that used for conventionally fueled heat sources.
Date: February 1, 1996
Creator: Lienau, P.J. & Ross, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The furnace in the basement: Part 1, The early days of the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Program, 1970--1973

Description: This report presents the descriptions of the background information and formation of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Geothermal Energy Group. It discusses the organizational, financial, political, public-relations,geologic, hydrologic, physical, and mechanical problems encountered by the group during the period 1970--1973. It reports the failures as well as the successes of this essential first stage in the development of hot dry rock geothermal energy systems.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Smith, M.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Multipurpose Use of Geothermal Energy

Description: The conference was organized to review the non-electric, multipurpose uses of geothermal energy in Hungary, Iceland, New Zealand, United States and the USSR. The international viewpoint was presented to provide an interchange of information from countries where non-electric use of geothermal energy has reached practical importance.
Date: October 9, 1974
Creator: Lienau, Paul J. & Lund, John W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department