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Characterizations of Some Combinatorial Geometries

Description: We give several characterizations of partition lattices and projective geometries. Most of these characterizations use characteristic polynomials. A geometry is non—splitting if it cannot be expressed as the union of two of its proper flats. A geometry G is upper homogeneous if for all k, k = 1, 2, ... , r(G), and for every pair x, y of flats of rank k, the contraction G/x is isomorphic to the contraction G/y. Given a signed graph, we define a corresponding signed—graphic geometry. We give a characterization of supersolvable signed graphs. Finally, we give the following characterization of non—splitting supersolvable signed-graphic geometries : If a non-splitting supersolvable ternary geometry does not contain the Reid geometry as a subgeometry, then it is signed—graphic.
Date: August 1992
Creator: Yoon, Young-jin
Partner: UNT Libraries

TEM Studies of Carbon Coated LiFePO4 after Charge DischargeCycling

Description: Carbon coating has proven to be a successful approach toimprove the rate capability of LiFePO4 used in rechargeable Li-ionbatteries. Investigations of the microstructure of carbon coated LiFePO4after charge discharge cycling shows that the carbon surface layerremains intact over 100 cycles. We find micro cracks in the cycledmaterial that extend parallel to low indexed lattice planes. Ourobservations differ from observations made by other authors. However thedifferences between the orientations of crack surfaces in both studiescan be reconciled considering the location of weak bonds in the unit celland specimen geometry as well as elastic stress fields ofdislocation.
Date: November 30, 2006
Creator: Gabrisch, H.; Wilcox, J. & Doeff, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Predictions of Elliptic flow and nuclear modification factor from 200 GeV U+U collisions at RHIC

Description: Predictions of elliptic flow (v{sub 2}) and nuclear modification factor (R{sub AA}) are provided as a function of centrality in U + U collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Since the {sup 238}U nucleus is naturally deformed, one could adjust the properties of the fireball, density and duration of the hot and dense system, for example, in high energy nuclear collisions by carefully selecting the colliding geometry. Within our Monte Carlo Glauber based approach, the v{sub 2} with respect to the reaction plane v{sub 2}{sup RP} in U + U collisions is consistent with that in Au + Au collisions, while the v{sub 2} with respect to the participant plane v{sub 2}{sup PP} increases {approx}30-60% at top 10% centrality which is attributed to the larger participant eccentricity at most central U + U collisions. The suppression of R{sub AA} increases and reaches {approx}0.1 at most central U + U collisions that is by a factor of 2 more suppression compared to the central Au + Au collisions due to large size and deformation of Uranium nucleus.
Date: July 7, 2010
Creator: Masui, Hiroshi; Mohanty, Bedangadas & Xu, Nu
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A SURFACE CRYSTALLOGRAPHY STUDY BY DYNAMICAL LEED OF THE (sqrt3xsqrt3)R30o CO STRUCTURE ON THE Rh(111) CRYSTAL SURFACE

Description: The atomic positions of the Rh(111) + ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{sup o} CO and CO{sub 2} surfaces are analyzed by dynamical LEED. The Rh(111) + ({radical}3 x {radical}3)R30{sup o} CO and CO{sub 2} systems produce identical I-V curves, confirming the dissociation of CO{sub 2} to CO on this surface. The adsorbed CO is found to stand perpendicular to the surface with the carbon end down at an atop site (that is, terminally bonded). The CO overlayer spacings are d{sub RhC} = 1.95 {+-} 0.1 {angstrom} and d{sub CD} = 1.07 {+-} 0.1 {angstrom}. This geometry yields a Zanazzi-Jona R-factor of 0.40 and a Pendry R-factor of 0.50.
Date: September 1, 1980
Creator: Koestner, R.J.; Van Hove, M.A. & Somorjai, G.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Designing the Ideal Uranyl Ligand: a Sterically-Induced Speciation Change in Complexes with Thiophene-Bridged Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methylpyridin-2-one)

Description: Structural characterization of a mononuclear uranyl complex with a tetradentate, thiophene-linked bis(3-hydroxy-N-methylpyridin-2-one) ligand reveals the most planar coordination geometry yet observed with this ligand class. The introduction of ethylsulfanyl groups onto the thiophene linker disrupts this planar, conjugated ligand arrangement, resulting in the formation of dimeric (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}L{sub 2} species in which each ligand spans two uranyl centers. Relative energy calculations reveal that this tendency toward dimer formation is the result of steric interference between ethylsulfanyl substituents and linking amides.
Date: September 11, 2009
Creator: Szigethy, Geza & Raymond, Kenneth N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Mathematics Advisory Panel

Description: The U.S. Department of Education, in partnership with the Conference Board of Mathematical Sciences, hosted the first National Math Panel Forum on October 6-7, 2008. This page documents the Forum activities, which brought together various organizations and other interested parties.
Date: 2008
Creator: National Mathematics Advisory Panel
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Residual gas pressure profile in the recycler ring

Description: We simulate the pressure profile of residual gases from basic principles using detailed beam pipe geometry and the relevant physical parameters. These profiles are compared with the actual ion gauge measurements and is being used to predict the vacuum contribution to the Recycler Ring beam lifetime.
Date: May 27, 2003
Creator: Gounder, Krish; Marriner, John & Mishra, Shekhar
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Root status and future developments

Description: In this talk the authors review the major additions and improvements made to the ROOT system in the last 18 months and present their plans for future developments. The additions and improvements range from modifications to the I/O sub-system to allow users to save and restore objects of classes that have not been instrumented by special ROOT macros, to the addition of a geometry package designed for building, browsing, tracking and visualizing detector geometries. Other improvements include enhancements to the quick analysis sub-system (TTree::Draw()), the addition of classes that allow inter-file object references (TRef, TRefArray), better support for templates and STL classes, amelioration of the Automatic Script Compiler and the incorporation of new fitting and mathematical tools. Efforts have also been made to increase the modularity of the ROOT system with the introduction of more abstract interfaces and the development of a plug-in manager. In the near future, they intend to continue the development of PROOF and its interfacing with GRID environments. They plan on providing an interface between Geant3, Geant4 and Fluka and the new geometry package. The ROOT-GUI classes will finally be available on Windows and they plan to release a GUI inspector and builder. In the last year, ROOT has drawn the endorsement of additional experiments and institutions. It is now officially supported by CERN and used as key I/O component by the LCG project.
Date: October 1, 2003
Creator: al., Rene Brun et
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessing non-uniqueness: An algebraic approach

Description: Geophysical inverse problems are endowed with a rich mathematical structure. When discretized, most differential and integral equations of interest are algebraic (polynomial) in form. Techniques from algebraic geometry and computational algebra provide a means to address questions of existence and uniqueness for both linear and non-linear inverse problem. In a sense, the methods extend ideas which have proven fruitful in treating linear inverse problems.
Date: September 16, 2002
Creator: Vasco, Don W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department