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Structure of the Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff at Mesita del Buey, Technical Area 54, Los Alamos National Laboratory

Description: The geological structure of the Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff at Mesita del Buey, Technical Area 54, was examined using precise surveying of the contact between tuff units Iv and 2 for 3.5 km along the north wall of Pajarito Canyon and 0.6 km along the north wall of a tributary to Caiiada del Buey. Estimated structure contours on this contact indicate typical strikes of N40E to N70E along this part of Mesita del Buey, although the apparent stfike of the tuff is E-W at the western part of the survey. Typical dips are 1.OO to 2.0o to the east or southeast, with an estimated maximum dip of 3.2o near the west end of Material Disposal AreaG. Thirty seven faults with vertical displacements of 5 to 65 cm were observedin outcrops along the Pajarito Canyon traverse, and, due to the incomplete exposure of the contact between unit lV and unit 2, many more faults of this magnitude undoubtedly exist. The faults have a wide range in strike and have either down-to-the-west or down-to-the-east components of offset, although about 65% of the observed displacement is down-to-the-west or northwest. The general absence of larger-scale offsets or inflections along the contact between units lV and 2 in areas where the small-scale faults were observed suggests that they are not associated with major fault zones. Instead, these faults may record distributed secondary deformation across the Pajarito Plateau associated with large earthquakes on the main Pajarito fault zone 8 to 11 km to the west, or perhaps earthquakes on other faults in the region. The survey data also suggest that a 150 to 250 m wide zone of greater magnitude faulting is present near the west end of the traverse associated with a horst-and-graben structure displaying about 1.5 to 3.5 m of offset on ...
Date: December 1, 1998
Creator: LaDelfe, Carol; Broxton, David E.; Carney, John S. & Reneau, Steven L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geology and Petrophysical Characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D Simulation of a Fluvial-Deltaic Reservoir

Description: The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Four activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and petrophysical characterization of the fluvial-deltaic Ferron Sandstone in the Ivie Creek case-study area: (1) regional stratigraphic interpretation, (2) case-study evaluation, (3) reservoir modeling, and (4) technology transfer.
Date: May 20, 1997
Creator: Mattson, Ann; Forster, Craig B.; Anderson, Paul B.; Snelgrove, Steve H. & Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Hanford quarterly seismic monitoring report 96C

Description: Seismic monitoring at the Hanford Site was established in 1969 by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) under a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. In 1975 the University of Washington assumed responsibility for and expanded the network. In 1979 the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) became responsible for collecting seismic data for the site as part of site characterization. Rockwell International Operations followed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), Geosciences Group, operated the local network and were the contract technical advisors for the Eastern Washington Regional Network operated by the University of Washington. Funding ended for BWIP in December 1988. Seismic Monitoring and the University of Washington contract was then transferred WHC`s Environmental Division. Seismic Monitoring is currently assigned to WHC`s Hanford Technical Services (HTS), part of the Environmental Division. The Seismic Monitoring Analysis and Repair Team (SMART) operates, maintains, and analyzes data from the Hanford Seismic Network (HSN), extending the site historical seismic database and fulfilling U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office requirements and orders. The Seismic Monitoring Analysis and Repair Team also maintains the Eastern Washington Regional Network (EWRN). The University of Washington uses the data from the EWRN and other seismic networks in the Northwest to provide the SMART with necessary regional input for the seismic hazards analysis at the Hanford Site.
Date: September 24, 1996
Creator: Reidel, S.P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Independent seismic evaluation of the 24-580-980 south connector ramps response to the south connector ramps to a magnitude 7.25 Hayward Fault earthquake. Volume 3

Description: The 24/580/980 interchange is located near Oakland California on the Eastern perimeter of the San Francisco Bay (Fig. 1 and Fig. 2). This interchange is a major artery in the Eastern San Francisco Bay area and provides a critical link between major bay area highways. The main Concord line of the Bay Area Rapid Transit System (BART), with ridership of approximately 270,000 per day, runs underneath the interchange. The interchange site is approximately 4 Km from the Hayward fault and 16 Km from the San Andreas fault. The reinforced concrete interchange was designed and constructed in the mid 1960`s and thus the asphalt structure has many of the vulnerabilities associated with typical pre-1970`s concrete structures (Roberts [1], Zefinski [2], Chai et. al. [3], Priestly and Seible [4]). In 1980 some of the seismic vulnerabilities were addressed as the interchange was retrofit with deck hinge restrainers as part of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) state-wide seismic retrofit of bridge expansion joints. The interchange was subjected to earthquake motion during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake and sustained minor damage in some of the concrete diaphragms which support the hinge restrainer forces [5]. Caltrans engineers, working together with their external consultants Imbsen and Associates, have recently completed a seismic retrofit design for portions of the interchange. The retrofit is primarily intended to fix inadequacies in many of the 1960`s vintage reinforced concrete elements which constitute the bridge superstructure and foundations.
Date: November 1996
Creator: McAllen, David B.; Gerhard, Michael A.; Trummer, David J. & Murray, Robert C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Increased Oil Production and Reserves from Improved Completion Techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah, Class I

Description: The objective of this project was to increase oil production and reserves by the use of improved reservoir characterization and completion techniques in the Unita Basin Utah. To accomplish this objective, a two-year geologic and engineering characterization of the Bluebell field was conducted. The study evaluated surface and subsurface data, currently used completion techniques, and common production problems. It was determined that advanced case- and open-hole logs could be effective in determining productive beds and that staged-interval (about 500 ft [150 m] per stage) and bed-scale isolation completion techniques could result in improved well performance.
Date: January 20, 2000
Creator: Morgan, Craig D.; Gwynn, Wallace; Deo, Milind D.; Jarrard, Richard; Curtice, Richard; Morris, Thomas H. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Regional characterization of Western China

Description: Geological, geophysical, and seismic data are being assembled and organized into a knowledge base for Western China as part of the CTBT Research and Development regional characterization effort. We have begun our analysis using data from the station WMQ of the Chinese Digital Seismic Network (CDSN). Regional seismograms are being analyzed to construct travel time curves, velocity models, attenuation characteristics, and to quantify regional propagation effects such as phase blockages. Using locations from the USGS Preliminary Determination of Epicenters (PDE) we have identified Pn, Pg, Sn, and Lg phases, constructed travel time curves, and estimated apparent velocities using linear regression. Surface wave group velocities will be measured and inverted for regional structure. Preliminary noise spectra for WMQ have been obtained from the IRIS DMC. Chinese seismicity catalogs from the USGS and SSB are being used to identify and obtain seismic data (including mine seismicity) and information for lower magnitude events. We have identified the locations of nearly 500 mines in China for inclusion in the knowledge base. Future work will involve expanding the data collection and analysis efforts to a larger region using data from additional CDSN, IRIS and portable stations.
Date: September 1, 1995
Creator: Randall, G.E.; Weaver, T.A.; Hartse, H.E.; Taylor, S.R.; Warren, R.G. & Cogbill, A.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Valey-Fill Sandstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

Description: Subsurface data is being collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from about ½ of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base. All of the four 30� X 60� geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface geologic data base for the Crow Reservation and all are nearing completion. Formal technical review prior to publication has been completed for the Billings and Bridger Quadrangles; and are underway for the Hardin and Lodge Grass Quadrangles. Field investigations were completed during the last quarter. With the help of a student field assistant from the Crow Tribe, the entire project area was inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits in the Kootenai Formation. Field inventory has resulted in the identification of nine exposures of thick valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least four major westward-trending valley systems. All the channel localities have been measured and described in detail and paleocurrent data has been collected from all but one locality. In addition, two stratigraphic sections were measured in areas where channels are absent. One channel has bee traced over a distance of about 60 miles and exhibits definite paleostructural control. An abstract describing this channel has been submitted and accepted for presentation at the Williston Basin Symposium in October, 1998.
Date: April 7, 1998
Creator: Lopez, David A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Geological and Petrophysical Characterization of the Ferron Sandstone for 3-D Simulation of a Fluvial-Deltaic Reservoir

Description: The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reser v oir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similiar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined . Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations . Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. Four activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and petrophysical characterization of the fluvial-deltaic Ferron Sandstone in the Ivie Creek case-study area: (1) geostatistics, (2) field description of clinoform bounding surfaces, (3) reservoir modeling, and (4) technology transfer.
Date: March 1, 1997
Creator: Allison, M. Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Valley-Fill Sandstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

Description: Subsurface data continues to be collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from about ¾ of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base. All of the four 30� X 60� geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface geologic data base for the Crow Reservation and all are nearing completion. Formal technical review prior to publication has been completed for all the quadrangles; Billings, Bridger; Hardin, and Lodge Grass. Final GIS edits are being made before being forwarded to the Bureau�s Publications Department. Field investigations were completed during the third quarter, 1997. With the help of a student field assistant from the Crow Tribe, the entire project area was inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits in the Kootenai Formation. Field inventory has resulted in the identification of nine exposures of thick valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least four major westward-trending valley systems. All the channel localities have been measured and described in detail and paleocurrent data has been collected from all but one locality. In addition, two stratigraphic sections were measured in areas where channels are absent. One channel has bee traced over a distance of about 60 miles and exhibits definite paleostructural control. An abstract describing this channel has been submitted and accepted for presentation at the Williston Basin Symposium in October, 1998.
Date: July 3, 1998
Creator: Lopez, David A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

U.S. Geological Survery Oil and Gas Resource Assessment of the Russian Arctic

Description: The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed a study of undiscovered petroleum resources in the Russian Arctic as a part of its Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal (CARA), which comprised three broad areas of work: geological mapping, basin analysis, and quantitative assessment. The CARA was a probabilistic, geologically based study that used existing USGS methodology, modified somewhat for the circumstances of the Arctic. New map compilation was used to identify assessment units. The CARA relied heavily on geological analysis and analog modeling, with numerical input consisting of lognormal distributions of sizes and numbers of undiscovered accumulations. Probabilistic results for individual assessment units were statistically aggregated, taking geological dependencies into account. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds were used to support the purchase of crucial seismic data collected in the Barents Sea, East Siberian Sea, and Chukchi Sea for use by USGS in its assessment of the Russian Arctic. DOE funds were also used to purchase a commercial study, which interpreted seismic data from the northern Kara Sea, and for geographic information system (GIS) support of USGS mapping of geological features, province boundaries, total petroleum systems, and assessment units used in the USGS assessment.
Date: December 31, 2008
Creator: Gautier, Donald & Klett, Timothy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Illinois State Geological Survey Evaluation of CO2 Capture Options from Ethanol Plants

Description: The Illinois State Geological Survey and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium are conducting CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced oil recovery testing at six different sites in the Illinois Basin. The capital and operating costs for equipment to capture and liquefy CO{sub 2} from ethanol plants in the Illinois area were evaluated so that ethanol plants could be considered as an alternate source for CO{sub 2} in the event that successful enhanced oil recovery tests create the need for additional sources of CO{sub 2} in the area. Estimated equipment and operating costs needed to capture and liquefy 68 metric tonnes/day (75 tons/day) and 272 tonnes/day (300 tons/day) of CO{sub 2} for truck delivery from an ethanol plant are provided. Estimated costs are provided for food/beverage grade CO{sub 2} and also for less purified CO{sub 2} suitable for enhanced oil recovery or sequestration. The report includes preliminary plant and equipment designs and estimates major capital and operating costs for each of the recovery options. Availability of used equipment was assessed.
Date: September 30, 2006
Creator: Finley, Robert
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California

Description: As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.
Date: October 1, 2005
Creator: Downey, Cameron & Clinkenbeard, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Best Practice -- Subsurface Investigations

Description: These best practices for Subsurface Survey processes were developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and later shared and formalized by a sub-committee, under the Electrical Safety Committee of EFCOG. The developed best practice is best characterized as a Tier II (enhanced) survey process for subsurface investigations. A result of this process has been an increase in the safety and lowering of overall cost, when utility hits and their related costs are factored in. The process involves improving the methodology and thoroughness of the survey and reporting processes; or improvement in tool use rather than in the tools themselves. It is hoped that the process described here can be implemented at other sites seeking to improve their Subsurface Investigation results with little upheaval to their existing system.
Date: March 1, 2010
Creator: Scott, Clark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of Nonnative Invasive Plants in the DOE Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park

Description: The Department of Energy (DOE) National Environmental Research Park at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is composed of second-growth forest stands characteristic of much of the eastern deciduous forest of the Ridge and Valley Province of Tennessee. Human use of natural ecosystems in this region has facilitated the establishment of at least 167 nonnative, invasive plant species on the Research Park. Our objective was to assess the distribution, abundance, impact, and potential for control of the 18 most abundant invasive species on the Research Park. In 2000, field surveys were conducted of 16 management areas on the Research Park (14 Natural Areas, 1 Reference Area, and Walker Branch Watershed) and the Research Park as a whole to acquire qualitative and quantitative data on the distribution and abundance of these taxa. Data from the surveys were used to rank the relative importance of these species using the ''Alien Plant Ranking System, Version 5.1'' developed by the U.S. Geological Survey. Microstegium (Microstegium vimineum) was ranked highest, or most problematic, for the entire Research Park because of its potential impact on natural systems, its tendency to become a management problem, and how difficult it is to control. Microstegium was present in 12 of the 16 individual sites surveyed; when present, it consistently ranked as the most problematic invasive species, particularly in terms of its potential impact on natural systems. Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica) and Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense) were the second- and third-most problematic plant species on the Research Park; these two species were present in 12 and 9 of the 16 sites surveyed, respectively, and often ranked second- or third-most problematic. Other nonnative, invasive species, in decreasing rank order, included kudzu (Pueraria montma), multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora), Chinese lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneara), and other species representing a variety of life forms and growth forms. Results ...
Date: November 5, 2002
Creator: Drake, S.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian sandstone reservoirs. January 1-March 31, 1993

Description: The overall objectives of this work are: (i) to investigate the importance of various qualities and quantities of data on the optimization of water flooding performance; and (ii) to study the application of newly developed, geostatistical techniques to analyze available production data to predict future prospects of infill drilling. Specifically to satisfy the first objective, the authors will study the feasibility of applying fractal geometry concepts to characterize individual formations; develop a three-dimensional conditional simulation program to define reservoir properties at various scales; establish a method to integrate the data collected at various scales including the well test and the core data; and to investigate the utility of outcrop data in describing subsurface reservoir details. To satisfy the second objective, the authors will investigate various techniques to utilize the production data, including initial potential and the production decline, in proposing a possible location for a future infill well. The techniques investigated will include geostatistical analyses. The study will be restricted to Pennsylvanian sandstones reservoirs commonly found in Oklahoma.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Kelkar, B.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Compression of Complex-Valued SAR Imagery

Description: Synthetic Aperture Radars are coherent imaging systems that produce complex-valued images of the ground. Because modern systems can generate large amounts of data, there is substantial interest in applying image compression techniques to these products. In this paper, we examine the properties of complex-valued SAR images relevant to the task of data compression. We advocate the use of transform-based compression methods but employ radically different quantization strategies than those commonly used for incoherent optical images. The theory, methodology, and examples are presented.
Date: March 3, 1999
Creator: P., Eichel & Ives, R.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Kriging for interpolation of sparse and irregularly distributed geologic data

Description: For many geologic problems, subsurface observations are available only from a small number of irregularly distributed locations, for example from a handful of drill holes in the region of interest. These observations will be interpolated one way or another, for example by hand-drawn stratigraphic cross-sections, by trend-fitting techniques, or by simple averaging which ignores spatial correlation. In this paper we consider an interpolation technique for such situations which provides, in addition to point estimates, the error estimates which are lacking from other ad hoc methods. The proposed estimator is like a kriging estimator in form, but because direct estimation of the spatial covariance function is not possible the parameters of the estimator are selected by cross-validation. Its use in estimating subsurface stratigraphy at a candidate site for geologic waste repository provides an example.
Date: December 31, 1986
Creator: Campbell, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian sandstone reservoirs. July 1-September 30, 1992

Description: The overall objectives of this work are: (i) to investigate the importance of various qualities and quantities of data on the optimization of water flooding performance; and (ii) to study the application of newly developed, geostatistical techniques to analyze available production data to predict future prospects of infill drilling. Specifically to satisfy the first objective, the authors will study the feasibility of applying fractal geometry concepts to characterize individual formations; develop a three-dimensional conditional simulation program to define reservoir properties at various scales; establish a method to integrate the data collected at various scales including the well test and the core data; and to investigate the utility of outcrop data in describing subsurface reservoir details. To satisfy the second objective, the authors will investigate various techniques to utilize the production data, including initial potential and the production decline, in proposing a possible location for a future infill well. The techniques investigated will include geostatistical analyses. The study will be restricted to Pennsylvanian sandstones reservoirs commonly found in Oklahoma.
Date: March 1, 1995
Creator: Kelkar, B.G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Geoscience Data Repository System: Phase III - Implementation and Operataion of the Repository.

Description: Activities during the second quarter dealt with the deployment of the NGDRS technological infrastructure (hardware, software and network components). Orders were placed for all major items (Sun servers and Xyplex 9000 data router). Sun servers are expected to be delivered during the week of July 21. Setting up of NGDRS continued with the development of the front-end pages for web site and with the development of software items that permit or facilitate the tasks of NGDRS users. Activity on Project Task 1. 0, the conversion and installation of electronic databases, continues at a slower pace until the basic Metadata Repository infrastructure is in place. The additional contacts established with PGS, BEG, Kansas Geological Survey (KGS), Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), and Minerals Management Service have led to good progress. A NGDRS project meeting was held on June 18 in Houston to review progress, discuss new targets and define new steps.
Date: July 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Increased Oil Production and Reserves from Improved Completion Techniques in the Bluebell Field, Uinta Basin, Utah

Description: The objective of this project is to increase oil production and reserves in the Uinta Basin by demonstrating improved completion techniques. Low productivity of Uinta Basin wells is caused by gross production intervals of several thousand feet that contain perforated thief zones, water-bearing zones, and perforated oil-bearing intervals. Geologic and engineering characterization and computer simulation of the Green River and Wasatch Formations in the Bluebell field will determine reservoir heterogeneities related to fractures and depositional trends. This will be followed by drilling and recompletion of several wells to demonstrate improved completion techniques based on the reservoir characterization. Transfer of the project results will be an ongoing component of the project.
Date: May 9, 1997
Creator: Morgan, C.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management.

Description: The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period April - June 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the `Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist`. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with a pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to convert shear wave velocity measured through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius and ultra-short radius lateral recompletions as well as other techniques.
Date: July 28, 1997
Creator: Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nauyen, John; Moos, Dan et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Outcrop Gamma-ray Analysis of the Cretaceous mesaverde Group: Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico

Description: This report presents the results of an outcrop gamma-ray survey of six selected measured sections included in the original report. The primary objective of this second study is to provide a baseline to correlate from the outcrop and reservoir model into Mesaverde strata in the San Juan Basin subsurface. Outcrop logs were generated using a GAD-6 gamma-ray spectrometer that simultaneously recorded total counts, potassium, uranium, and thorium data.
Date: April 25, 2001
Creator: Ridgley, Jennie & Dunbar, Robyn Wright
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigations on the Structure Tectonics, Geophysics, Geochemistry, and Hydrocarbon Potential of the Black Mesa Basin, Northeastern Arizona

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has instituted a basin-analysis study program to encourage drilling in underexplored and unexplored areas and increase discovery rates for hydrocarbons by independent oil companies within the continental United States. The work is being performed at the DOE's National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) in Bartlesville, Oklahoma, by the Exploration and Drilling Group within BDM-Oklahoma (BDM), the manager of the facility for DOE. Several low-activity areas in the Mid-Continent, west, and southwest were considered for the initial study area (Reeves and Carroll 1994a). The Black Mesa region in northwestern Arizona is shown on the U.S. Geological Survey 1995 oil and gas map of the United States as an undrilled area, adapted from Takahashi and Gautier 1995. This basin was selected by DOE s the site for the initial NIPER-BDM survey to develop prospects within the Lower-48 states (Reeves and Carroll 1994b).
Date: April 27, 1999
Creator: Barker, Colin; Carroll, Herbert; Erickson, Richard; George, Steve; Guo, Genliang; Reeves,T.K. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase III: Implementation and operation of the repository, progress report, February--March, 1997

Description: The pace of activities in several of the tasks was accelerated. Activities on Project 1.0, the conversion and installation of electronic databases, were kicked-off with meetings at the BEG in Austin and with PGS in Houston. Initial project plans were drafted for all major sub-projects that were jointly agreed by AGI and The Information Store. Eight major sub-projects were identified: three dealing with data transfer and preservation, four dealing with the conversion of electronic databases (BEG, PGS, Kansas Geological Survey, MOBIL Seismic Sales), and one dealing with the deployment of the hardware, software and networking infrastructure for the Metadata Repository.
Date: April 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department