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Effects of additives on pressure limits of flame propagation of propane-air mixtures

Description: Report presenting a study of seven additives in 0.5-volume-percent concentration for their effects on the low-pressure limits of flame propagation of propane-air mixtures. Limits were measured in a flame tube of new design. Results regarding propane-air mixtures, propane-air-additive mixtures, and flame propagation qualities are provided.
Date: December 18, 1953
Creator: Belles, Frank E. & Simon, Dorothy M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ignition of Ammonia and Mixed Oxides of Nitrogen in 200-Pound-Thrust Rocket Engines at 160 Degrees F

Description: Memorandum presenting a study of the ignition of ammonia and mixed oxides of nitrogen at 160 degrees Fahrenheit made with and without fuel additives utilizing small-scale rocket engines of approximately 200 pounds thrust. All experiments were conducted at sea-level pressures except two at a range of pressure altitudes. Results regarding the use of lithium as a catalyst, calcium as a catalyst, and no apparent catalyst are provided.
Date: May 13, 1954
Creator: Hennings, Glen; Ladanyi, Dezso J. & Enders, John H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Temperature response of turbine-blade metal covered with oxide coatings supplied by fuel additives

Description: Report presenting an investigation to determine the effects of turbine-blade coatings, supplied by fuel additives, on heat transfer with combustor exhaust gases to an S-816 alloy blade. Two fuel additives were used. The results indicated that the fuel additives provided an oxide coating on the combustor-liner wall and other metal parts, including the blade, exposed to the exhaust gas.
Date: August 20, 1952
Creator: McCafferty, Richard J. & Butze, Helmut F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Characterization of the Cobalamin and Fep Operons in Methylobium petrolphilum PM1

Description: The bacterium Methylobium petroleophilum PM1 is economically important due to its ability to degrade methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), a fuel additive. Because PM1 is a representative of all MTBE degraders, it is important to understand the transport pathways critical for the organism to survive in its particular environment. In this study, the cobalamin pathway and select iron transport genes will be characterized to help further understand all metabolic pathways in PM1. PM1 contains a total of four cobalamin operons. A single operon is located on the chromosome. Located on the megaplasmid are two tandem repeats of cob operons and a very close representative of the cob operon located on the chromosome. The fep operon, an iron transport mechanism, lies within the multiple copies of the cob operon. The cob operon and the fep operon appear to be unrelated except for a shared need for the T-on-B-dependent energy transduction complex to assist the operons in moving large molecules across the outer membrane of the cell. A genomic study of the cob and the fep operons with that of phylogenetically related organisms helped to confirm the identity of the cob and fep operons and to represent the pathways. More study of the pathways should be done to find the relationship that positions the two seemingly unrelated cob and fep genes together in what appears to be one operon.
Date: September 6, 2005
Creator: Ewing, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Review of market for octane enhancers: Final report

Description: Crude oil is easily separated into its principal products by simple distillation. However, neither the amounts nor the quality of these natural products matches demand. Today, octane requirements must be achieved by changing the chemical composition of the straight-run gasoline fraction.
Date: June 20, 2000
Creator: J. E. Sinor Consultants, Inc.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experiments and Analysis of DPF Loading and Regeneration

Description: Particulate filter system consists of a filter and a regeneration strategy Commercial filters are very effective at removing PM, but regeneration is a challenge. In addition to removal of PM if is important to reduce other pollutants including NO, from diesel engine exhaust Particulate filter regeneration strategy can include catalysts, fuel additives, engine control, and fuel injection Regeneration 5M?-500 C without catalyst Near 350 C with fuel additive or catalyst coated DPF
Date: August 20, 2000
Creator: Balakrishnan, Krishnan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Federal Highway Administration Gasohol Consumption Estimation Model

Description: The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is responsible for estimating the portion of Federal highway funds attributable to each State. The process involves use of State-reported data (gallons) and a set of estimation models when accurate State data is unavailable. To ensure that the distribution of funds is equitable, FHWA periodically reviews the estimation models. Estimation of the use of gasohol is difficult because of State differences in the definition of gasohol, inability of many States to separate and report gasohol usage from other fuel types, changes in fuel composition in nonattainment areas to address concerns over the use of certain fuel additives, and the lack of a valid State-level surrogate data set for gasohol use. Under the sponsorship of FHWA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) reviewed the regression-based gasohol estimation model that has been in use for several years. Based on an analytical assessment of that model and an extensive review of potential data sets, ORNL developed an improved rule-based model. The new model uses data from Internal Revenue Service, Energy Information Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy, ORNL, and FHWA sources. The model basically consists of three parts: (1) development of a controlled total of national gasohol usage, (2) determination of reliable State gasohol consumption data, and (3) estimation of gasohol usage for all other States. The new model will be employed for the 2004 attribution process. FHWA is currently soliciting comments and inputs from interested parties. Relevant data, as identified, will be pursued and refinements will be made by the research team if warranted.
Date: August 28, 2003
Creator: Hwang, HL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Batch Microreactor Studies of Lignin Depolymerization by Bases. 2. Aqueous Solvents

Description: Biomass feedstocks contain roughly 15-30% lignin, a substance that can not be converted to fermentable sugars. Hence, most schemes for producing biofuels assume that the lignin coproduct will be utilized as boiler fuel. Yet, the chemical structure of lignin suggests that it will make an excellent high value fuel additive, if it can be broken down into smaller compounds. From Fiscal year 1997 through Fiscal year 2001, Sandia National Laboratories participated in a cooperative effort with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the University of Utah to develop and scale a base catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) process for lignin conversion. SNL's primary role in the effort was to perform kinetic studies, examine the reaction chemistry, and to develop alternate BCD catalyst systems. This report summarizes the work performed at Sandia during Fiscal Year 1999 through Fiscal Year 2001 with aqueous systems. Work with alcohol based systems is summarized in part 1 of this report. Our study of lignin depolymerization by aqueous NaOH showed that the primary factor governing the extent of lignin conversion is the NaOH:lignin ratio. NaOH concentration is at best a secondary issue. The maximum lignin conversion is achieved at NaOH:lignin mole ratios of 1.5-2. This is consistent with acidic compounds in the depolymerized lignin neutralizing the base catalyst. The addition of CaO to NaOH improves the reaction kinetics, but not the degree of lignin conversion. The combination of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CaO offers a cost saving alternative to NaOH that performs identically to NaOH on a per Na basis. A process where CaO is regenerated from CaCO{sub 3} could offer further advantages, as could recovering the Na as Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} or NaHCO{sub 3} by neutralization of the product solution with CO2. Model compound studies show that two types of reactions involving methoxy substituents on the aromatic ...
Date: May 1, 2002
Creator: MILLER, JAMES E.; EVANS, LINDSEY; MUDD, JASON E. & BROWN, KARA A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The potential for low petroleum gasoline

Description: The Energy Policy Act requires the Secretary of Energy to determine the feasibility of producing sufficient replacement fuels to replace at least 30 percent of the projected consumption of motor fuels by light duty vehicles in the year 2010. The Act also requires the Secretary to determine the greenhouse gas implications of the use of replacement fuels. A replacement fuel is a non-petroleum portion of gasoline, including certain alcohols, ethers, and other components. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model has been used to study the cost and refinery impacts for production of {open_quotes}low petroleum{close_quotes} gasolines, which contain replacement fuels. The analysis suggests that high oxygenation is the key to meeting the replacement fuel target, and a major contributor to cost increase is investment in processes to produce and etherify light olefins. High oxygenation can also increase the costs of control of vapor pressure, distillation properties, and pollutant emissions of gasolines. Year-round low petroleum gasoline with near-30 percent non-petroleum components might be produced with cost increases of 23 to 37 cents per gallon of gasoline, and with greenhouse gas emissions changes between a 3 percent increase and a 16 percent decrease. Crude oil reduction, with decreased dependence on foreign sources, is a major objective of the low petroleum gasoline program. For year-round gasoline with near-30 percent non-petroleum components, crude oil use is reduced by 10 to 12 percent, at a cost $48 to $89 per barrel. Depending upon resolution of uncertainties about extrapolation of the Environmental Protection Agency Complex Model for pollutant emissions, availability of raw materials and other issues, costs could be lower or higher.
Date: June 1, 1996
Creator: Hadder, G.R.; Webb, G.M. & Clauson, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

Description: The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume (Sections 1 through 5).
Date: January 31, 1999
Creator: Schobert, H.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Evaluation of a zirconium additive for the mitigation of molten ash formation during combustion of residual fuel oil

Description: Florida Power & Light Company (FP&L) currently fires a residual fuel oil (RFO) containing catalyst fines, which results in a troublesome black aluminosilicate liquid phase that forms on heat-transfer surfaces, remains molten, and flows to the bottom of the boiler. When the unit is shut down for a scheduled outage, this liquid phase freezes to a hard black glass that damages the contracting waterwalls of the boiler. Cleaning the boiler bottom and repairing damaged surfaces increase the boiler downtime, at a significant cost to FP&L. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) proposed to perform a series of tests for FP&L to evaluate the effectiveness of a zirconium additive to modify the mechanism that forms this liquid phase, resulting in the formation of a dry refractory phase that may be easily handled during cleanup of the boiler.
Date: December 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Task 4.9 -- Value-added products from syngas

Description: The work on advanced fuel forms in 1996 focused on the synthesis of higher alcohols from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon dioxide (syngas) from coal gasification. The conversion of coal gasification products to commercially valuable alcohols will provide an important new market for current and future gasification plants. Initial work in this project utilized a novel molybdenum sulfide catalyst previously shown to be active for hydrodesulfurization reactions of coal liquids. The support for the active metal sulfide is a layered mixed oxide (hydrotalcite) capable of interaction with the metal sites for catalysis of carbon monoxide reductions. These catalysts have a high surface area, are highly porous, and have basic and acidic functionality. A pressurized fixed-bed flow-through reactor was constructed, and the MoS{sub 2} catalysts were tested with syngas under a variety of conditions. Unfortunately, the catalysts, even with higher molybdenum loading and addition of promoters, failed to give alcohol products. A batch reactor test of the catalyst was also conducted, but did not produce alcohol products. Group 8 metals have been used previously in catalysts for syngas reactions. Ruthenium and rhodium catalysts were prepared by impregnation of a hydrotalcite support. Tests with these catalysts in flow-through reactors also did not produce the desired alcohol products. The formation of higher alcohols from smaller ones, such as methanol and ethanol, could be commercially important if high selectivity could be achieved. The methanol and ethanol would be derived from syngas and fermentation, respectively. Based on previous work in other laboratories, it was hypothesized that the hydrotalcite supported MoS{sub 2} or Ru or Rh catalysts could catalyze the formation of butyl alcohols. Although the desired 1-butanol was obtained in batch reactions with the promoted Ru catalyst, the reaction was not as selective as desired. Product suitable for a lower-vapor-pressure gasoline oxygenate additive was obtained, ...
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Olson, E.S. & Sharma, R.K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhancement of methane conversion using electric fields. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997

Description: The goal of this project is the development of novel, economical, processes for the conversion of natural gas to more valuable projects such as methanol, ethylene and other organic oxygenates or higher hydrocarbons. The methodologies of the project are to investigate and develop low temperature electric discharges and electric field-enhanced catalysis for carrying out these conversions. In the case of low temperature discharges, the conversion is carried out at ambient temperature which in effect trades high temperature thermal energy for electric energy as the driving force for conversion. The low operating temperatures relax the thermodynamic constraints on the product distribution found at high temperature and also removes the requirements of large thermal masses required for current technologies. With the electric field-enhanced conversion, the operating temperatures are expected to be below those currently required for such processes as oxidative coupling, thereby allowing for a higher degree of catalytic selectivity while maintaining high activity.
Date: August 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Oxygenates vs. synthesis gas

Description: Methanol synthesis from H{sub 2}/CO has been carried out at 7.6 MPa over zirconia-supported copper catalysts. Catalysts with nominal compositions of 10/90 mol% and 30/70 mol% Cu/ZrO{sub 2} were used in this study. Additionally, a 3 mol% cesium-doped 10/90 catalyst was prepared to study the effect of doping with heavy alkali, and this promoter greatly increased the methanol productivity. The effects of CO{sub 2} addition, water injection, reaction temperature, and H{sub 2}/C0 ratio have been investigated. Both CO{sub 2} addition to the synthesis gas and cesium doping of the catalyst promoted methanol synthesis, while inhibiting the synthesis of dimethyl ether. Injection of water, however, was found to slightly suppress methanol and dimethyl ether formation while being converted to CO{sub 2} via the water gas shift reaction over these catalysts. There was no clear correlation between copper surface area and catalyst activity. Surface analysis of the tested samples revealed that copper tended to migrate and enrich the catalyst surface. The concept of employing a double-bed reactor with a pronounced temperature gradient to enhance higher alcohol synthesis was explored, and it was found that utilization of a Cs-promoted Cu/ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as a first lower temperature bed and a Cs-promoted ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as a second high-temperature bed significantly promoted the productivity of 2-methyl-1-propanol (isobutanol) from H{sub 2}/CO synthesis gas mixtures. While the conversion of CO to C{sub 2+} oxygenates over the double-bed configuration was comparable to that observed over the single Cu-based catalyst, major changes in the product distribution occurred by the coupling to the zinc chromite catalyst; that is, the productivity of the C{sub 1}-C{sub 3} alcohols decreased dramatically, and 2-methyl branched alcohols were selectively formed. The desirable methanol/2-methyl oxygenate molar ratios close to 1 were obtained in the present double-bed system that provides the feedstock for the ...
Date: April 1, 1999
Creator: Klier, Kamil; Herman, Richard G.; Beretta, Alessandra; Burcham, Maria A.; Sun, Qun; Cai, Yeping et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Development of ceramic membranes for conversion of methane into syngas.

Description: The abundantly available natural gas (mostly methane) discovered in remote areas has stimulated considerable research on upgrading this gas to high-value-added clean-burning fuels such as dimethyl ether and alcohols and to pollution-fighting fuel additives. Of the two routes to convert methane to valuable products, direct and indirect, the indirect route involving partial oxidation of methane to syngas (a mixture of CO and H{sub 2}) is preferred. Syngas is used as feedstock to produce a variety of petrochemicals and transportation fuels. A mixed-conducting dense ceramic membrane was developed from Sr-Fe-Co oxide. Extruded and sintered tubes of SrFeCoO{sub 0.5}O{sub x} have been evaluated in a reactor operating at {approx}850 C for conversion of methane into syngas in the presence of a reforming catalyst. Some of the reactor tubes have been run for more than 1000 h, and methane conversion efficiencies of {approx}98% and CO selectivities of >96% were observed.
Date: September 23, 1999
Creator: Balachandran, U. & Ma, B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Batch Microreactor Studies of Lignin Depolymerization by Bases. 1. Alcohol Solvents

Description: Biomass feedstocks contain roughly 10-30% lignin, a substance that can not be converted to fermentable sugars. Hence, most schemes for producing biofuels (ethanol) assume that the lignin coproduct will be utilized as boiler fuel to provide heat and power to the process. However, the chemical structure of lignin suggests that it will make an excellent high value fuel additive, if it can be broken down into smaller molecular units. From fiscal year 1997 through fiscal year 2001, Sandia National Laboratories was a participant in a cooperative effort with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the University of Utah to develop and scale a base catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) process for lignin conversion. SNL's primary role in the effort was to utilize rapidly heated batch microreactors to perform kinetic studies, examine the reaction chemistry, and to develop alternate catalyst systems for the BCD process. This report summarizes the work performed at Sandia during FY97 and FY98 with alcohol based systems. More recent work with aqueous based systems will be summarized in a second report.
Date: May 1, 2002
Creator: MILLER, JAMES E.; EVANS, LINDSEY; LITTLEWOLF, ALICIA & TRUDELL, DANIEL E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rheology of coal-water slurries prepared by the HP roll mill grinding of coal. Quarterly technical progress report No. 13, September 1, 1995--November 30, 1995

Description: The objective of this research is the development of improved technology of the preparation of coal-water slurries that have potential for replacing fuel oil in direct combustion. Research accomplishments are summarized for: standardization of experimental procedures; investigation of effect of high-pressure roll mill/ball mill grinding on the energetics of fine grinding and the rheology of coal-water slurries prepared with such fines; study of aging behavior of slurries; and ways of improving rheology of slurries. The rheological behavior of slurries is a manifestation of particle-particle and particle-fluid interactions in the slurry. Improvement in the rheology of slurries could be brought about by suitably altering these interactions. The research directed towards investigation of the influence of co-addition of sodium hexametaphosphate and vacuum oil, with CoalMaster as the primary dispersant, showed that co-addition of the reagents significantly improved the rheology of coal-water slurries. Further research conducted in this quarter indicated that co-addition of reagents also improves the long-term rheological behavior of coal-water slurries.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Fuerstenau, D.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THE ECONOMICAL PRODUCTION OF ALCOHOL FUELS FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNTHESIS GAS. Includes quarterly technical progress report No.25 from 10/01/1997-12/31/1997, and quarterly technical progress report No.26 from 01/01/1998-03/31/1998

Description: This project was divided into two parts. One part evaluated possible catalysts for producing higher-alcohols (C{sub 2} to C{sub 5+}) as fuel additives. The other part provided guidance by looking both at the economics of mixed-alcohol production from coal-derived syngas and the effect of higher alcohol addition on gasoline octane and engine performance. The catalysts studied for higher-alcohol synthesis were molybdenum sulfides promoted with potassium. The best catalysts produced alcohols at a rate of 200 g/kg of catalyst/h. Higher-alcohol selectivity was over 40%. The hydrocarbon by-product was less than 20%. These catalysts met established success criteria. The economics for mixed alcohols produced from coal were poor compared to mixed alcohols produced from natural gas. Syngas from natural gas was always less expensive than syngas from coal. Engine tests showed that mixed alcohols added to gasoline significantly improved fuel quality. Mixed-alcohols as produced by our catalysts enhanced gasoline octane and decreased engine emissions. Mixed-alcohol addition gave better results than adding individual alcohols as had been done in the 1980's when some refiners added methanol or ethanol to gasoline.
Date: March 1, 1999
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rheological properties essential for the atomization of Coal Water Slurries (CWS). Final report, September 1, 1991--July 31, 1995

Description: The objective of this study was to understand the effect of low shear, high shear rheology, viscoelastic, and extensional properties on the atomization of CWS. In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays were determined at various air-to-CWS ratios using a Malvern 2600 particle size analyzer and a Delavan Solid Cone Atomizing Nozzle. Solids-loading, coal particle size distributions, and chemical additives were varied in order to determine the significant properties that influence CWS atomization. A correlation of the mass mean droplet size with high shear, viscoelastic and extensional behaviors were made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on CWS atomization.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Ohene, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Enhancement of methane conversion using electric fields. Quarterly report, July--September 1995

Description: The goal of this project is the development of novel, economical, processes for the conversion of natural gas to more valuable projects such as methanol, ethylene and other organic oxygenates or higher hydrocarbons. The methodologies of the project are to investigate and develop low temperature electric discharges and electric field-enhanced catalysis for carrying out these conversions. In the case of low temperature discharges, the conversion is carried out at ambient temperature which in effect trades high temperature thermal energy for electric energy as the driving force for conversion. The low operating temperatures relax the thermodynamic constraints on the product distribution found at high temperature and also removes the requirements of large thermal masses required for current technologies. With the electric field-enhanced conversion, the operating temperatures are expected to be below those currently required for such processes as oxidative coupling, thereby allowing for a higher degree of catalytic selectivity while maintaining high activity.
Date: November 1, 1995
Creator: Mallinson, R.G. & Lobban, L.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Coal upgrading program for Usti nad Labem, Czech Republic: Task 8.3. Topical report, October 1994--August 1995

Description: Coal has been a major energy source in the Czech Republic given its large coal reserves, especially brown coal and lignite (almost 4000 million metric tons) and smaller reserves of hard, mainly bituminous, coal (over 800 million tons). Political changes since 1989 have led to the reassessment of the role of coal in the future economy as increasing environmental regulations affect the use of the high-sulfur and high-ash brown coal and lignite as well as the high-ash hard coal. Already, the production of brown coal has declined from 87 million metric tons per year in 1989 to 67 million metric tons in 1993 and is projected to decrease further to 50 million metric tons per year of brown coal by the year 2000. As a means of effectively utilizing its indigenous coal resources, the Czech Republic is upgrading various technologies, and these are available at different stages of development, demonstration, and commercialization. The purpose of this review is to provide a database of information on applicable technologies that reduce the impact of gaseous (SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, volatile organic compounds) and particulate emissions from the combustion of coal in district and residential heating systems.
Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Young, B.C. & Musich, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Petroleum Market Model of the National Energy Modeling System

Description: The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Petroleum Market Model (PMM), describe its basic approach, and provide detail on how it works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. The PMM models petroleum refining activities, the marketing of petroleum products to consumption regions. The production of natural gas liquids in gas processing plants, and domestic methanol production. The PMM projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil, both domestic and imported; other inputs including alcohols and ethers; natural gas plant liquids production; petroleum product imports; and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates domestic refinery capacity expansion and fuel consumption. Product prices are estimated at the Census division level and much of the refining activity information is at the Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District level. This report is organized as follows: Chapter 2, Model Purpose; Chapter 3, Model Overview and Rationale; Chapter 4, Model Structure; Appendix A, Inventory of Input Data, Parameter Estimates, and Model Outputs; Appendix B, Detailed Mathematical Description of the Model; Appendix C, Bibliography; Appendix D, Model Abstract; Appendix E, Data Quality; Appendix F, Estimation methodologies; Appendix G, Matrix Generator documentation; Appendix H, Historical Data Processing; and Appendix I, Biofuels Supply Submodule.
Date: January 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, 1995

Description: The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable jet fuels has five components:(1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub- micrometer and micrometer sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and (5) assessment of the potential of producing high yields of cycloalkanes and hydroaromatics by direct liquefaction of coal. Progress reports for these tasks are presented.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S. & Song, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Catalytic conversion of light alkanes, Phase 1. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993

Description: The authors have found a family of new catalytic materials which, if successfully developed, will be effective in the conversion of light alkanes to alcohols or other oxygenates. Catalysts of this type have the potential to convert natural gas to clean-burning high octane liquid fuels directly without requiring the energy-intensive steam reforming step. In addition they also have the potential to upgrade light hydrocarbons found in natural gas to a variety of high value fuel and chemical products. In order for commercially useful processes to be developed, increases in catalytic life, reaction rate and selectivity are required. Recent progress in the experimental program geared to the further improvement of these catalysts is outlined.
Date: December 31, 1993
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department