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Energy Tax Incentives: Measuring Value Across Different Types of Energy Resources

Description: This report presents a comparison of the cost of tax incentives associated with fossil and renewable energy resources, relative to amount of energy produced using each type of resource. The report also reviews other analyses that compare the cost of energy tax incentives relative to production, across different types of energy technologies.
Date: March 19, 2015
Creator: Sherlock, Molly F. & Stupak, Jeffrey M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Overview of Unconventional Oil and Natural Gas: Resources and Federal Actions

Description: This report focuses on the growth in U.S. oil and natural gas production driven primarily by tight oil formations and shale gas formations. It also reviews selected federal environmental regulatory and research initiatives related to unconventional oil and gas extraction, including the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) proposed hydraulic fracturing rule and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions.
Date: January 5, 2015
Creator: Ratner, Michael & Tiemann, Mary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An Overview of Unconventional Oil and Natural Gas: Resources and Federal Actions

Description: This report focuses on the growth in U.S. oil and natural gas production driven primarily by tight oil formations and shale gas formations. It also reviews selected federal environmental regulatory and research initiatives related to unconventional oil and gas extraction, including the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) proposed hydraulic fracturing rule and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) actions.
Date: November 21, 2014
Creator: Ratner, Michael & Tiemann, Mary
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

U.S. Fossil Fuel Resources: Terminology, Reporting, and Summary

Description: This report describes the characteristics of fossil fuels that make it necessary to use precise terminology, summarizes the major terms and their meanings, and provides a brief summary of the United States' endowment of fossil fuels and the relationship between the U.S. fossil fuel energy endowment and those of other nations.
Date: November 30, 2010
Creator: Whitney, Gene; Behrens, Carl E. & Glover, Carol
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fossil Energy Program annual progress report for April 1994 through March 1995

Description: This report covers progress made during the period April 1, 1994, through March 31, 1995, for research and development projects that contribute to the advancement of various fossil energy technologies. Projects on the Fossil Energy Program are supported by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, and DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, the DOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, the DOE Fossil Energy Clean Coal Technology Program, the DOE Bartlesville Project Office, and the DOE Fossil Energy Office of Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The following research areas are covered in this report: Materials research and development; Environmental analysis support; Bioprocessing research; Coal combustion research; and Fossil fuels supplies modeling and research. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science an Technology database.
Date: June 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Base program on energy related research. Quarterly report, November 1, 1996--January 31, 1997

Description: The Base Research Program at Western Research Institute (WRI) is planned to develop technologies to a level that will attract industrial sponsors for continued development under the Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) Program. The goals of the Base Research Program are in support of those of the JSR Program, which are designed to: increase the production of US and western energy resources, particularly low-sulfur coal, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy resources; enhance the competitiveness of US and western energy technologies in international markets and assist in technology transfer; reduce the nation`s dependence on foreign energy supplies and strengthen both the US and regional economies; and minimize environmental impacts of energy production and utilization. Summaries are presented for 11 subtasks related to these four main goals.
Date: June 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2

Description: It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the second annual technical progress report for the Vision 21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2001 and ending September 30, 2002. The report includes an introduction summarizing ...
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Rizeq, George; West, Janice; Frydman, Arnaldo; Subia, Raul; Zamansky, Vladimir; Loreth, Hana et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS

Description: Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, inc., Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur.
Date: April 30, 2002
Creator: Roark, Shane E.; Sammells, Anthony F.; Mackay, Richard A.; Pitzman, Lyrik Y.; Zirbel, Thomas A.; Barton, Thomas F. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

COFIRING OF BIOMASS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA

Description: A project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory was completed by the Energy & Environmental Research Center to explore the potential for cofiring biomass at the University of North Dakota (UND). The results demonstrate how 25% sunflower hulls can be cofired with subbituminous coal and provide a 20% return on investment or 5-year payback for the modifications required to enable firing biomass. Significant outcomes of the study are as follows. A complete resource assessment presented all biomass options to UND within a 100-mile radius. Among the most promising options in order of preference were sunflower hulls, wood residues, and turkey manure. The firing of up to 28% sunflower hulls by weight was completed at the university's steam plant to identify plant modifications that would be necessary to enable cofiring sunflower hulls. The results indicated investments in a new equipment could be less than $408,711. Data collected from test burns, which were not optimized for biomass firing, resulted in a 15% reduction in sulfur and NO{sub x} emissions, no increase in opacity, and slightly better boiler efficiency. Fouling and clinkering potential were not evaluated; however, no noticeable detrimental effects occurred during testing. As a result of this study, UND has the potential to achieve a cost savings of approximately $100,000 per year from a $1,500,000 annual fossil fuel budget by implementing the cofiring of 25% sunflower hulls.
Date: January 1, 2002
Creator: Hutton, Phillip N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

Description: OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of ...
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report of a Policy Forum: Weather, Climate, and Energy

Description: The report of a policy forum on Weather, Climate, and Energy presents findings and recommendations that, if implemented, could position the energy sector, the providers of weather and climate science and services, and energy consumers to mange more cooperatively and effectively the production, distribution, and consumption of electrical power and fossil fuels. Recent U.S. experience with a series of energy shortages encouraged the AMS Atmospheric Policy Program to join with the University of Oklahoma in the development of a forum to address the issues connected with responding to those shortages. Nearly 100 representatives from the public, private, and academic portions of the energy production sector, the meteorological community, political and corporate leaders, weather risk management analysts, and policy makers met on October 16-17, 2001 to discuss these policy issues.
Date: July 1, 2002
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Report on the Study of the Tax and Rate Treatment of Renewable Energy Projects

Description: This study was conducted in response to Section 1205 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), requiring the U.S. Department of Energy in conjunction with state regulatory commissions to determine if conventional tax measures and ratemaking procedures provide economic barriers to or incentives for the adoption of renewable electric generating plants compared to conventional ones. For this study, we defined barriers and incentives in terms of financial criteria used by investor-owned utilities (IOUs) and nonutility electricity generators (NUGs) when making decisions on technologies for new generating plants. For IOUs, the major criterion used was the levelized cost of producing power over the useful life of the technology. For NUGs, the major criterion used was the internal rate of return. Clearly, there are many factors outside the scope of this study that relate to the decisionmaking process of IOUs and NUGs. This study to determine barriers and incentives does not attempt to determine which technologies would most likely be adopted by IOUs and NUGs. Technologies are only cost (in)effective relative to a given power system and its set of internal and external conditions. Other technology-related factors such as availability, dispatchability, diversity, and reliability of generating alternatives are also considered in the decisionmaking process used by IOUs and NUGs. The results of this study show only the relative impact of certain tax measures and ratemaking procedures on financial criteria that IOUs and NUGs use as inputs to make technology-adoption decisions. Where these tax measures and ratemaking procedures provide incentives for an alternative, they increase the likelihood that the alternative will be selected by IOUs or NUGs when making generating-resource decisions. In quantifying the parameters of the seven renewable and four conventional generating options studied, we used today's ''conventional wisdom'' on the values of variables defining the technologies. We did not speculate ...
Date: January 1, 1993
Creator: Hadley, S.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monthly Energy Review, February 1996

Description: This monthly publication presents an overview of EIA`s recent monthly energy statistics, covering the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Two brief descriptions (`energy plugs`) on two EIA publications are presented at the start.
Date: February 26, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimates of global, regional, and national annual CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring: 1950--1992

Description: This document describes the compilation, content, and format of the most comprehensive C0{sub 2}-emissions database currently available. The database includes global, regional, and national annual estimates of C0{sub 2} emissions resulting from fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing, and gas flaring in oil fields for 1950--92 as well as the energy production, consumption, and trade data used for these estimates. The methods of Marland and Rotty (1983) are used to calculate these emission estimates. For the first time, the methods and data used to calculate CO, emissions from gas flaring are presented. This C0{sub 2}-emissions database is useful for carbon-cycle research, provides estimates of the rate at which fossil-fuel combustion has released C0{sub 2} to the atmosphere, and offers baseline estimates for those countries compiling 1990 C0{sub 2}-emissions inventories.
Date: December 1, 1995
Creator: Boden, T.A.; Marland, G. & Andres, R.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Annual energy review 1996

Description: This report presents historical energy statistics on all major energy activities. The statistics cover consumption, production, trade, stock, and prices, for all major energy commodities including fossil fuels, electricity, and renewable energy sources.
Date: July 1, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Monthly energy review, October 1996

Description: This document presents statistical data on U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, nuclear energy, coal, and electricity.
Date: October 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Base program on energy related research. Quarterly report, February 1--April 30, 1996

Description: The Base Research Program at Western Research Institute (WRI) is planned to develop technologies to a level that will attract industrial sponsors for continued development under the Jointly Sponsored Research (JSR) Program. The goals of the Base Research Program are in support of those of the JSR Program, which are designed to: increase the production of US and western energy resources, particularly low-sulfur coal, natural gas, oil, and renewable energy resources; enhance the competitiveness of US and western energy technologies in international markets and assist in technology transfer; reduce the nation`s dependence on foreign energy supplies and strengthen both the US and regional economies; and minimize environmental impacts of energy production and utilization. Summaries are presented for many of the subtasks related to oil and gas research, advanced systems applications for coal, environmental technologies, and remediation. The paper also contains federal assistance management summary reports, and contract status reports.
Date: December 31, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fossil fuel-fired peak heating for geothermal greenhouses

Description: This report examines the capital and operating costs for fossil fuel-fired peak heating systems in geothermally (direct use) heated greenhouses. Issues covered include equipment capital costs, fuel requirements, maintenance and operating costs, system control and integration into conventional hot water greenhouse heating systems. Annual costs per square foot of greenhouse floor area are developed for three climates: Helena, MT; Klamath Falls, OR and San Bernardino, CA, for both boiler and individual unit heater peaking systems. In most applications, peaking systems sized for 60% of the peak load are able to satisfy over 95% of the annual heating requirements and cost less than $0.15 per square foot per year to operate. The propane-fired boiler system has the least cost of operation in all but Helena, MT climate.
Date: December 1, 1996
Creator: Rafferty, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electric power monthly, March 1995

Description: This report for March 1995, presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.
Date: March 20, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electric power monthly, December 1996 with data for September 1996

Description: The report presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.
Date: December 1, 1996
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Assessment of supply-side alternatives for the Handlova heating system

Description: The goals of this study were to: (1) perform technical and economical analyses for three alternatives for the production and distribution of thermal energy in the town of Handlova, Slovakia, (2) perform and economic evaluation for the main parameters for each alternative at the given required rate of return, (3) evaluate the sensitivity of the cost of delivered energy to several parameters, such as the thermal energy demand, cost of fuels and real interest rate, and (4) provide this information to the town officials for their decisions about the future development of the heat supply for space heating and water heating in the residential and non-residential sectors.
Date: October 1, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Solar photocatalytic conversion of CO{sub 2} to methanol

Description: This report summarizes the three-year LDRD program directed at developing catalysts based on metalloporphyrins to reduce carbon dioxide. Ultimately it was envisioned that such catalysts could be made part of a solar-driven photoredox cycle by coupling metalloporphyrins with semiconductor systems. Such a system would provide the energy required for CO{sub 2} reduction to methanol, which is an uphill 6-electron reduction. Molecular modeling and design capabilities were used to engineer metalloporphyrin catalysts for converting CO{sub 2} to CO and higher carbon reduction products like formaldehyde, formate, and methanol. Gas-diffusion electrochemical cells were developed to carry out these reactions. A tin-porphyrin/alumina photocatalyst system was partially developed to couple solar energy to this reduction process.
Date: February 1, 1997
Creator: Ryba, G.; Shelnutt, J.; Prairie, M.R. & Assink, R.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department