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Technologies to Sustain Tropical Forest Resources

Description: An assessment by the Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) that identifies and discusses "in-depth some of the constraints and opportunities to develop and implement forest-sustaining technologies"(p. iii).
Date: March 1984
Creator: United States. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impact of Potential Phosphate Mining on the Hydrology of Osceola National Forest, Florida

Description: Report and geological survey. This report examines the effects of phosphate mining in Osceola National Forest, a 245-square mile area in Columbia and Baker Counties, Florida. It includes maps, graphs, and tables.
Date: February 1978
Creator: Miller, James A.; Hughes, Gilbert H.; Hull, Robert W.; Vecchioli, John & Seaber, Paul R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

[Small Farm]

Description: Photograph of a small farmhouse surrounded by small buildings, piles of wood, and a fenced-off field. The farm is at the base of distant, tree-covered hills.
Date: 19uu
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Homeward Bound]

Description: Photograph of a young boy in a straw hat and overalls walking down a dirt road, with trees and bushes lining the path around him. "Homeward Bound" is written beneath the bottom left corner of the mounted image. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS. Signed by: Joe Clark, HBSS
Date: 19uu
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Children Walking Down the Road]

Description: Photograph of a boy and a girl walking down a dirt road under the shade of trees above. The boy is wearing a straw hat and overalls, and the girl is wearing a dress and a bonnet. "Main Street" is written directly below the bottom left corner of the mounted image, and "Barefoot days and pleasant roads" is written in the bottom left corner of the piece. Narrative by Junebug Clark: Additional photos and information can be found in the pdf document "Joe Clark HBSS Scrapbook" pages 16-18. The Detroit News Pictorial. May 11, 1941. Going to School in the Tennessee Hills Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS.
Date: 19uu
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

A Primer of Forestry

Description: This report discusses forests and treats the topic in four parts. The first part describes the life of an individual tree, and the second describes individual trees as parts of a forest. The third and fourth parts discuss forests as communities of trees and methods for preventing destruction of forests.
Date: 1903
Creator: Pinchot, Gifford, 1865-1946
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

National Park System: Establishing New Units

Description: This report discusses the National Park System that includes 391 diverse units administered by the National Park Service (NPS) of the Department of the Interior. Units of the system generally are managed to preserve resources in their natural or historical conditions for the benefit of future generations.
Date: June 10, 2008
Creator: Vincent, Carol Hardy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Biodiversity Conservation and Forestry Programs: 2012 Report

Description: The report fulfills the requirements for an annual report on implementation of Section 118 of the Foreign Assistance Act that focuses on the "continuing and accelerating alteration, description and loss of tropical forests in developing countries".
Date: December 2012
Creator: United States. Agency for International Development.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sustaining Tropical Forest Resources: Reforestation of Degraded Lands

Description: This background paper is designed to provide the U.S. Congress with an overview of some reforestation technologies and their possible beneficial and adverse impacts. It also discusses the constraints and opportunities for the introduction of these technologies in such activities as timber and fuel production, watershed protection, and agroforestry.
Date: May 1983
Creator: United States. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Sustaining Tropical Forest Resources: Reforestation of Degraded Lands

Description: This background paper is designed to provide the U.S. Congress with an overview of some reforestation technologies and their possible beneficial and adverse impacts. It also discusses the constraints and opportunities for the introduction of these technologies in such activities as timber and fuel production, watershed protection, and agroforestry.
Date: May 1983
Creator: United States. Congress. Office of Technology Assessment.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Technique for Quantifying Forest Stands for Management Evaluations

Description: "In this study, a system for describing the three-dimensional geometry of trees and stands is presented. The system consists of two survey instruments, a theodolite and transit, and basic triangulation principles. A spotting laser has recently been added to the system to facilitate the spotting of the tree nodes to be surveyed" (p. ix). Results show significant differences in tree productivity as a result of fertilization and changes in heights, bole diameters, etc.
Date: December 1971
Creator: West, Henry W. & Allen, H. H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Forest Service Accountability in Administering Its Trust Funds

Description: The USDA Forest Service has numerous permanently appropriated trust funds and special funds that provide substantial funding independent of the annual appropriations process. Critics have alleged abuse of the funds and have sought greater congressional oversight, and the General Accounting Office has testified on the agency’s management of some of these accounts. While the Administration has offered few responses to the criticisms of these funds, it has, in its FY2001 budget request, proposed creating two new trust funds and combining several existing funds into a new fund with expanded purposes. This report provides an overview of the permanently appropriated Forest Service accounts and concerns over their use and proposed alternative structures that could provide greater public and congressional oversight and control over permanently appropriated funds.
Date: March 8, 2000
Creator: Gorte, Ross W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Light Spectra Distributions in Temperate Conifer-Forest Canopy Gaps, Oregon and in Tropical Cloud-Forest Canopy, Venezuela

Description: Light spectra distributions were measured in two different montane forests: temperate and tropical. Spectral light measurements were made in different sized canopy gaps in the conifer forest at H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon, USA. Researchers at Oregon State University created these gaps of 20 m, 30 m, and 50 m in diameter. In the tropical cloud forest, spectral light measurements were made in two plots that were permanently established at La Mucuy Parque Nacional in Venezuela, in collaboration with researchers at Universidad de Los Andes. In both studies, spectra and distributions of physiologically active light were analyzed: red, far-red, R/FR ratio, and blue light.
Date: December 1997
Creator: Monteleone, Susan Elaine
Partner: UNT Libraries

[House in the Trees]

Description: Photograph of a worn path with a fence running alongside it. In this image the path leads to a small house in the distance, surrounded by trees. Photo by: Joe Clark, HBSS.
Date: 19uu
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Mountain Forest

Description: Photograph of a forest lined meadow with mountains in the distance. Benches and a path are partially visible in the foreground.
Date: unknown
Creator: Williams, Byrd M. (Byrd Moore), Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

[Fetching Water From a Spout]

Description: Photograph of a boy filling a bucket with water. In the image, the boy is perched on the side of the water holding a bucket while it fills with water from the water spout. Another bucket sits to his left already full under the canopy of trees.
Date: 194u
Creator: Clark, Joe
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Forest Productivity and Diversity: Using Ecological Theory and Landscape Models to Guide Sustainable Forest Management

Description: Sustainable forest management requires maintaining or increasing ecosystem productivity, while preserving or restoring natural levels of biodiversity. Application of general concepts from ecological theory, along with use of mechanistic, landscape-based computer models, can contribute to the successful achievement of both of these objectives. Ecological theories based on the energetics and dynamics of populations can be used to predict the general distribution of individual species, the diversity of different types of species, ecosystem process rates and pool sizes, and patterns of spatial and temporal heterogeneity over a broad range of environmental conditions. This approach requires subdivision of total biodiversity into functional types of organisms, primarily because different types of organisms respond very differently to the spatial and temporal variation of environmental conditions on landscapes. The diversity of species of the same functional type (particularly among plants) tends to be highest at relatively low levels of net primary productivity, while the total number of different functional types (particularly among animals) tends to be highest at high levels of productivity (e.g., site index or potential net primary productivity). In general, the diversity of animals at higher trophic levels (e.g., predators) reaches its maximum at much higher levels of productivity than the diversity of lower trophic levels (e.g., plants). This means that a single environment cannot support high diversity of all types of organisms. Within the framework of the general patterns described above, the distributions, population dynamics, and diversity of organisms in specific regions can be predicted more precisely using a combination of computer simulation models and GIS data based on satellite information and ground surveys. Biophysical models that use information on soil properties, climate, and hydrology have been developed to predict how the abundance and spatial distribution of various plants and animals. These models can be, used to predict the patterns of forest ...
Date: November 1998
Creator: Huston, M. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department