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The Quantitative Determination of Glass in Slag and Fly Ash by Infrared Spectroscopy

Description: The present study was aimed at developing a new inexpensive and accurate analytical method for determining the glass content of slag and fly ash. Infrared absorption spectroscopy using an internal standard proved to be the method of choice. Both synthetic and commercial slags and fly ashes were investigated.
Date: December 1983
Creator: Eberendu, Alexis N. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Comparative Toxicity of Refuse-Derived Fuel Fly Ash on Two Species of Earthworms, Lumbricus terrestris and E. foetida, Using an Artificial Soil Exposure Protocol

Description: Research estimated toxicity of refuse-derived fuel fly ash (RDF-FA) on two earthworms species, Lumbricus terrestris and Eisenia foetida. Specific objectives were to: (1) Compare their 14-day LC50s under light and dark conditions; (2) separate toxicity due to osmotic, pH and physical factors from that of heavy metal contaminants; (3) compare relative differences of artificial soil and commercial soil as exposure media for evaluating toxicity to earthworms. The 14-d LC50s for L. terrestris in dark and light were 57.0 and 48.34 % RDF-FA, and 59.25 and 41.00 % RDF-FA for E. foetida using artificial soil. All of the toxicity resulted from heavy metals within the RDF-FA. Using L. terrestris, the LC50s for artificial soil and commercial soil were 52.30 and 64.34%.
Date: May 1991
Creator: Jahani, Aghamolla
Partner: UNT Libraries

Effects of Coal Fly-Ash Disposal on Water Quality in and Around the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, Indiana

Description: Abstract: Dissolved constituents in seepage from fly-ash settling ponds bordering part of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore (the Lakeshore) have increased trace elements, and gross alpha and gross beta radioactivity in the ground water and surface water downgradient from the settling ponds. Data suggest that concentrations of some dissolved trace elements may be greater beneath interdunal pond 2 than in the pond. The soil system downgradient from the settling ponds seems to have affected the concentrations of dissolved ions in the settling-ponds than in the ponds. Where organic material was present downgradient from the settling ponds, concentrations of arsenic, fluoride, molybdenum, potassium, sulfate, and strontium were greater in the ground water than in the ponds. In contrast, the concentrations of cadmium, copper, nickel, aluminum, cobalt, lead, and zinc were less.
Date: April 1981
Creator: Hardy, Mark A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fundamental Study of Low NOx Combustion Fly Ash Utilization

Description: This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.
Date: May 1, 1997
Creator: Suubert, E. M.; Kuloats, I.; Smith, K.; Sabanegh, N.; Hurt, R.H.; Lilly, W. D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Particle size distribution and qualitative/quantitative analysis of trace metals in the combustion gas and fly ash of coal/refuse derived fuel

Description: This work includes two different areas of research. Both areas are related to the combustion of the binder-enhanced densified refuse derived fuel (bdRDF) with high sulfur coal and examining trace elements. The first area of this work involved studying the trace metals in the combustion gas of bdRDF/coal blend and the effect of the binder, CA(OH)2, on reducing the trace elements emissions. The second area of work involved studying the trace elements in the fly ash and the effect of the dRDF and the binder of trace metals.
Date: December 1991
Creator: Attili, Bassam Saleem
Partner: UNT Libraries

Utilize Cementitious High Carbon Fly Ash (CHCFA) to Stabilize Cold In-Place Recycled (CIR) Asphalt Pavement as Base Coarse

Description: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of cementitious high carbon fly ash (CHCFA) stabilized recycled asphalt pavement as a base course material in a real world setting. Three test road cells were built at MnROAD facility in Minnesota. These cells have the same asphalt surface layers, subbases, and subgrades, but three different base courses: conventional crushed aggregates, untreated recycled pavement materials (RPM), and CHCFA stabilized RPM materials. During and after the construction of the three cells, laboratory and field tests were carried out to characterize the material properties. The test results were used in the mechanistic-empirical pavement design guide (MEPDG) to predict the pavement performance. Based on the performance prediction, the life cycle analyses of cost, energy consumption, and greenhouse gasses were performed. The leaching impacts of these three types of base materials were compared. The laboratory and field tests showed that fly ash stabilized RPM had higher modulus than crushed aggregate and RPM did. Based on the MEPDG performance prediction, the service life of the Cell 79 containing fly ash stabilized RPM, is 23.5 years, which is about twice the service life (11 years) of the Cell 77 with RPM base, and about three times the service life (7.5 years) of the Cell 78 with crushed aggregate base. The life cycle analysis indicated that the usage of the fly ash stabilized RPM as the base of the flexible pavement can significantly reduce the life cycle cost, the energy consumption, the greenhouse gases emission. Concentrations of many trace elements, particularly those with relatively low water quality standards, diminish over time as water flows through the pavement profile. For many elements, concentrations below US water drinking water quality standards are attained at the bottom of the pavement profile within 2-4 pore volumes of flow.
Date: February 5, 2011
Creator: Wen, Haifang; Li, Xiaojun; Edil, Tuncer; O'Donnell, Jonathan & Danda, Swapna
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scale-Up and Demonstation of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology

Description: This is the second quarterly report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730. Due a number of circumstances, mostly associated with subcontractor agreements, the actual beginning of the project was delayed from its original award date of March 5, 2003. DOE's Project Manager was kept informed (verbally) by PPL's Project Manager throughout this period. Because of this delay, this is the second quarterly report and it refers to the time period from July to September 2004. As the project is in its ''design'' stage, no results are available. This report summarizes the ongoing activities and provides an updated schedule. No significant issues or concerns are identified.
Date: September 30, 2004
Creator: LaBuz, Larry & Afonso, Rui
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scale-Up and Demonstration of Dly Ash Ozonation Technology

Description: This is the first Quarterly report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730. Due a number of circumstances, mostly associated with subcontractor agreements, the actual beginning of the project has been delayed from its original award date of March 5, 2003. DOE's Project Manager has been kept informed (verbally) by PPL's Project Manager throughout this period. Because of this delay, this is the first quarterly report and it refers to the time period from the official project authorization date to June 2004. In addition, this report is essentially a review of the project objectives and approach, with a brief update on the recent ''kick-off'' and site visit activities in the Results and Discussion section.
Date: June 30, 2004
Creator: LaBuz, Larry & Afonso, Rui
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Tech

Description: This is the third quarterly report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730. Due a number of circumstances, mostly associated with subcontractor agreements, the actual beginning of the project was delayed from its original award date of March 5, 2003. DOE's Project Manager was kept informed (verbally) by PPL's Project Manager throughout this period. Because of this delay, this is the third quarterly report and it refers to the time period from October to December 2004. As the project is in its ''pre-deployment'' stage, no results are available. This report summarizes the ongoing activities and provides an updated schedule. No significant issues or concerns are identified.
Date: December 31, 2004
Creator: Buz, Larry La & Afonso, Rui
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology

Description: This is the fourth quarterly report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730. Due a number of circumstances, mostly associated with subcontractor agreements, the actual beginning of the project was delayed from its original award date of March 5, 2003. DOE's Project Manager was kept informed (verbally) by PPL's Project Manager throughout this period. Because of this delay, this is the fourth quarterly report and it refers to the time period from January to March 2004. The on-site deployment and testing of the ozonation system took place during this period. This report summarizes these activities including some preliminary results. No significant issues or concerns are identified.
Date: March 31, 2005
Creator: LaBuz, Larry & Afonso, Rui
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Advanced Multi-Product Coal Utilization By-Product Processing Plant

Description: The objective of the project is to build a multi-product ash beneficiation plant at Kentucky Utilities 2,200-MW Ghent Generating Station, located in Carroll County, Kentucky. Phase 1 was completed successfully, but the project did not continue on to Phase 2 due to withdrawal of CEMEX from the project. Attempts at replacing CEMEX were not successful. Problematic to the continuation of the project was its location in the Ohio Valley which is oversupplied and has low prices for fly ash and the change in CEMEX priorities due to merger and acquisitions. Thus, CAER concurred with the DOE to conclude the project at the end of Budget Period 1, March 31, 2007.
Date: March 31, 2007
Creator: Robl, Thomas & Groppo, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fundamental Study of Low-Nox Combustion Fly Ash Utilization

Description: This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over forty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.
Date: November 1, 1997
Creator: Suuberg, E. M.; Kuloats, I.; Smith, K.; Sabanegh, N.; Hurt, R. H.; Lilly, W. D. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Residues From Coal Comversion and Utilization: Advanced Mineralogical Characterization and Disposed Byproduct Diagensesis

Description: The goals of the project are two-fold: 1) to upgrade semi-quantitative X-ray diffraction(QXRD) methods presently used in analyzing complex coal combustion by-product (CCB)systems, with the quantitative Rietveld method, and 2) to apply this method to a set of by-product materials that have been disposed or utilized for a long period (5 years or more) in contact with the natural environment, to further study the nature of CCB diagenesis. The project is organized into three tasks to accomplish these two goals: 1) thorough characterization of a set of previously analyzed disposed by-product materials, 2) development of a set of CCB specific protocols for Rietveld QXRD, and 3) characterization of an additional set of disposed CCB materials, including application of the protocols for Rietveld QXRD developed in Task 2.
Date: December 4, 1998
Creator: McCarthy, Gregory J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Kinetics of fly ash beneficiation by carbon burnout: Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1997

Description: To investigate the kinetics of beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout The project is a joint venture between Delmarva Power, a power generating company on the eastern shore of Maryland, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The studies have focused on the beneficiation of fly ash by carbon burnout.
Date: December 31, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Ash and pulverized coal deposition in combustors and gasifiers. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

Description: The computational model for simulating particle motions in turbulent flows was further developed and used to analyze the transport and dispersion of particles in a recirculating flow region. The model for resuspension of particles from surfaces in a gas flow is also further developed; it accounts for the surface adhesion as well as hydrodynamic forces and torques. It includes effects of the structure of near wall turbulent flows as well as surface roughness. In addition, a direct numerical simulation procedure for analyzing the particle removal process in turbulent gas flows is also developed. The sublayer model for evaluating the particle deposition in turbulent flows is being extended to include the effect of particle rebound. Further progress was also made in the experimental study of glass fiber transport and deposition in the aerosol wind tunnel.
Date: December 31, 1996
Creator: Ahmadi, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Silica/Fly Ash-Based technology for Controlling Pyrite Oxidation.

Description: The overall objective of this project is to develop methodologies by which sodium metasilicate or fly ash may produce an effective coating on pyrite surfaces for inhibiting pyrite oxidation. Milestones for the following periods include: First six-months - (1) Characterize pyrite surface reactions for understanding pyrite coating establishment. (2) Start a preliminary outdoor leaching - column experiment using 10 kg mine pyritic spoil treated with silicates to evaluate potential application of coatings on a large scale. Second six-months - (1) Characterize silicate - iron reactions in solution and on pyrite surface for understanding pyrite silica - coating formation. Third six-months - (1) Evaluate pyrite surface deposition of silicate having Na - silicate or fly ash as source. Fourth six- months - (1) Evaluate silicate coating durability in large outdoor columns.
Date: September 21, 1997
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Task 5.8 -- Development of a coal by-product classification protocol for utilization. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1995

Description: A large volume of fly ash is produced that does not meet current American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifications for use in the production of cement and concrete but could be used for other applications. In many cases, coal ash is required to meet ASTM specifications even when they are clearly inappropriate for the application (i.e., structural fill). Creating a classification system for fly ash that facilitates the use of performance-based specifications for use applications will broaden the utilization options for coal ash, resulting in elimination of disposal costs and opportunities for industry to develop new products and expand the use of coal ash in existing products. The inadequacy of the current classification system is one of the major technical barriers to increased coal by-product utilization. The goal of this project is to develop a classification system for fly ash that will provide a means of evaluating fly ash suitability for applications.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Dockter, B.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Market assessment of environmental issues affecting coal use for Los Alamos National Laboratory

Description: This is a market assessment of environmental issues affecting coal use through 2020. It was prepared by Los Alamos National Laboratories for the Fossil Energy R&D Program. It is based on interviews of representatives of 8 coal, coal technology, electricity and environmental groups concerned with the future of energy and the environment. Interviewees generally agreed that the U.S. and other countries would continue to need to use coal into the middle of the next century. The size of the market for coal would be determined by the ability of coal and coal technologies to meet environmental requirements at costs that would compete with natural gas. Outside the U.S., three interviewees suggested that there is a market for low cost coal technologies that will reduce the environmental impact of coal use, particularly in developing countries that have few alternative sources of energy. The principal environmental concerns mentioned in these interviews were: efficiency and carbon, air toxics, and NO{sub x}. Several also mentioned potential modifications to the SO{sub x} standards, a fine particulate standard, bottom and fly ash, and methane from coalbeds.
Date: March 20, 1995
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Chemical characterization of ash generated from alfalfa stem gasification: Agricultural and environmental implications. Quarterly report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997

Description: This progress report provides results of Toxicity Characteristics Leaching Procedures (TCLP) and Synthetic Leachate Test Procedure (SLTP) for the alfalfa stem ash. The TCLP simulates solute leaching in landfill by using acetic acid as a solvent and SLTP simulates potential for leaching from synthetic acid rain. This report also provides information on detailed chemical characterization of organic and inorganic constituents of the ash. The analysis performed includes information on compounds that may represent a potential risk to human or animal health and those constituents that may have beneficial use as soil amendments and conditioners. A sample of the fly (filter) ash from the test burn conducted in Finland was received in May 1997 and used for initial investigation. Three additional fly ash samples and one sample of bottom ash (reactor bed ash) were received in June 1997. The samples were either tested at the University of Minnesota or sent to a reputable laboratory, and various tests were conducted according to the standard methods. The result of the comprehensive tests conducted in May 1997 (report submitted previously) were used as a screening procedure for conducting tests on June 1997 samples. To provide a more comprehensive representation of ash characteristics the results for fly ash received in May are presented along with results from fly ash samples received in July. The average, range and coefficient of variation (CV) are provided. The TCLP and SLTP tests conducted in the laboratory indicated that the concentration of heavy metals were below or close to the detection limits for fly and bottom ash samples (Tables 1 and 2). The ash was also characterized for a number of classes of organic compounds that may pose potential environmental or health risks. These are polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), total and individual dioxin and furan compounds.
Date: October 30, 1997
Creator: Rosen, C.; Mozaffari, M.; Russelle, M. & Nater, E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Kinetics of beneficiated fly ash by carbon burnout

Description: The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called Loss On Ignition (LOI). The concrete producers` day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.
Date: December 31, 1997
Creator: Okoh, J.M.; Dodoo, J.N.D.; Diaz, A.; Ferguson, W.; Udinskey, J.R. Jr. & Christiana, G.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FUNDAMENTAL STUDY OF LOW-NOx COMBUSTION FLY ASH UTILIZATION

Description: This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over fifty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.
Date: October 19, 1998
Creator: SUUBERG, ERIC M. & HURT, ROBERT H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

PARTICULATE HOT GAS STREAM CLEANUP TECHNICAL ISSUES

Description: This quarterly report describes technical activities performed under Contract No. DE-AC21-94MC31160. The analyses of hot gas stream cleanup (HGCU) ashes and descriptions of filter performance studied under Task 1 of this contract are designed to address problems with filter operation that are apparently linked to characteristics of the collected ash. This report reviews the status of the HGCU data bank of ash and char characteristics, including the interactive querying of measured particulate properties. Task 1 plans for the remainder of the project include completion and delivery of the HGCU data bank, and issuance of a comprehensive final report on activities conducted under Task 1. Task 2 of this project concerns the testing and failure analyses of new and used filter elements and filter materials. Task 2 work during the past quarter included preliminary testing of two materials. One material tested was the soft candle filter manufactured by CGC and supplied by ABB. The other material was N610/mullite manufactured by Albany International (AIT).
Date: August 30, 1999
Creator: Pontius, D.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

OPTIMIZING PERFORMANCE OF THE HESKETT STATION

Description: The overall conclusion from this work is that a switch from river sand bed material to limestone at the R.M. Heskett Station would provide substantial benefits to MDU. A switch to limestone would increase the fuel flexibility of the unit, allowing fuels higher in both sodium and sulfur to be burned. The limestone bed can tolerate a much higher buildup of sodium in the bed without agglomeration, allowing either the bed turnover rate to be reduced to half the current sand feed rate for a fuel with equivalent sodium or allow a higher sodium fuel to be burned with limestone feed rates equivalent to the current sand feed rate. Both stack and ambient SO{sub 2} emissions can be controlled. A small improvement in boiler efficiency should be achievable by operating at lower excess oxygen levels at low load. This reduction in oxygen will also lower NO{sub x} emissions, providing a margin of safety for meeting emission standards. No detrimental effects of using limestone at the Heskett Station were uncovered as a result of the test burn. Some specific conclusions from this work include the following: The bed material feed rate can be reduced from the current rate of 5.4% of the coal feed rate (57.4 tons of sand/day) to 2.5% of the coal feed rate (27 tons of limestone/day). This will result in an annual savings of approximately $200,000. (1) SO{sub 2} emissions at the recommended feed rate would be approximately 250 ppm (0.82 lb/MMBtu) using a similar lignite. Based on the cost of the limestones, SO{sub 2} allowances could be generated at a cost of $60/ton SO{sub 2} , leaving a large profit margin for the sale of allowances. The addition of limestone at the same rate currently used for sand feed could generate $455,000 net income if allowances ...
Date: March 1, 1999
Creator: Mann, Michael D. & Henderson, Ann K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department