2,188 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Equations for Adiabatic but Rotational Steady Gas Flows without Friction

Description: This paper makes the following assumptions: 1) The flowing gases are assumed to have uniform energy distribution. ("Isoenergetic gas flows," that is valid with the same constants for the the energy equation entire flow.) This is correct, for example, for gas flows issuing from a region of constant pressure, density, temperature, end velocity. This property is not destroyed by compression shocks because of the universal validity of the energy law. 2) The gas behaves adiabatically, not during the compression shock itself but both before and after the shock. However, the adiabatic equation (p/rho(sup kappa) = C) is not valid for the entire gas flow with the same constant C but rather with an appropriate individual constant for each portion of the gas. For steady flows, this means that the constant C of the adiabatic equation is a function of the stream function. Consequently, a gas that has been flowing "isentropically",that is, with the same constant C of the adiabatic equation throughout (for example, in origination from a region of constant density, temperature, and velocity) no longer remains isentropic after a compression shock if the compression shock is not extremely simple (wedge shaped in a two-dimensional flow or cone shaped in a rotationally symmetrical flow). The solution of nonisentropic flows is therefore an urgent necessity.
Date: August 1, 1947
Creator: Schäefer, Manfred
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Two-Dimensional Potential Flows

Description: Contents include the following: Characteristic differential equations - initial and boundary conditions. Integration of the second characteristic differential equations. Direct application of Meyer's characteristic hodograph table for construction of two-dimensional potential flows. Prandtl-Busemann method. Development of the pressure variation for small deflection angles. Numerical table: relation between deflection, pressure, velocity, mach number and mach angle for isentropic changes of state according to Prandtl-Meyer for air (k = 1.405). References.
Date: November 1949
Creator: Schäefer, Manfred & Tollmien, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Flow of Gas Through Turbine Lattices

Description: This report is concerned with fluid mechanics of two-dimensional cascades, particularly turbine cascades. Methods of solving the incompressible ideal flow in cascades are presented. The causes and the order of magnitude of the two-dimensional losses at subsonic velocities are discussed. Methods are presented for estimating the flow and losses at high subsonic velocities. Transonic and supersonic flows in lattices are then analyzed. Some three-dimensional features of the flow in turbines are noted.
Date: May 1, 1956
Creator: Deich, M E
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Method for Rapid Determination of the Icing Limit of a Body in Terms of the Stream Conditions

Description: The effects of existing frictional heating were analyzed to determine the conditions under which ice formations on aircraft surfaces can be prevented. A method is presented for rapidly determining by means of charts the combination of-Mach number, altitude, and stream temperature which will maintain an ice-free surface in an icing cloud. The method can be applied to both subsonic and supersonic flow. The charts presented are for Mach numbers up to 1.8 and pressure altitudes from sea level to 45,000 feet.
Date: March 1953
Creator: Callaghan, Edmund E. & Serafini, John S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

General Correlation of Temperature Profiles Downstream of a Heated Air Jet Directed at Various Angles to Air Stream

Description: An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the temperature profiles downstream of heated air jets directed at angles of 90 deg, 60 deg, 45 deg, and 30 deg to an air stream. The profiles were determined at two positions downstream of the jet as a function of jet diameter, jet density, jet velocity, free-stream density, free-stream velocity, jet total temperature, orifice flow coefficient, and jet angle. A method is presented which yields a good approximation of the temperature profile in terms of the flow and geometric conditions.
Date: December 1952
Creator: Ruggeri, Robert S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impingement of Cloud Droplets on 36.5-Percent-Thick Joukowski Airfoil at Zero Angle of Attack and Discussion of Use as Cloud Measuring Instrument in Dye-Tracer Technique

Description: The trajectories of droplets i n the air flowing past a 36.5-percent-thick Joukowski airfoil at zero angle of attack were determined. The amount of water i n droplet form impinging on the airfoil, the area of droplet impingement, and the rate of droplet impingement per unit area on the airfoil surface were calculated from the trajectories and cover a large range of flight and atmospheric conditions. With the detailed impingement information available, the 36.5-percent-thick Joukowski airfoil can serve the dual purpose of use as the principal element in instruments for making measurements in clouds and of a basic shape for estimating impingement on a thick streamlined body. Methods and examples are presented for illustrating some limitations when the airfoil is used as the principal element in the dye-tracer technique.
Date: September 1, 1957
Creator: Brun, R. J. & Vogt, Dorothea E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impingement of water droplets on NACA 65(1)-208 and 65(1)-212 airfoils at 4 degrees angle of attack

Description: The trajectories of droplets in the air flowing past NACA 65(1)-208 airfoil and an NACA 65(1)-212 airfoil, both at an angle of attack of 4 degrees, were determined. The amount of water in droplet form impinging on the airfoils, the area of droplet impingement, and the rate of droplet impingement per unit area on the airfoil surface affected were calculated from the trajectories and are presented. The amount, extent, and rate of impingement of the NACA 65(1)-208 airfoil are compared with the results for the NACA 65(1)1-212 airfoil. Under similar conditions of operation, the NACA 65(1)-208 airfoil collects less water than the NACA 65(1)-212 airfoil. The extent of impingement on the upper surface of the NACA 65(1)-208 airfoil is much less than on the upper surface of the NACA 65(1)-212 airfoil, but on the lower surface the extents of impingement are about the same.
Date: May 1, 1953
Creator: Brun, R. J.; Gallagher, H. M. & Vogt, D. E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impingement of Droplets in 90 deg Elbows with Potential Flow

Description: Trajectories were determined for droplets in air flowing through 90 deg elbows especially designed for two-dimensional potential motion with low pressure losses. The elbows were established by selecting as walls of each elbow two streamlines of the flow field produced by a complex potential function that establishes a two-dimensional flow around a 90 deg bend. An unlimited number of elbows with slightly different shapes can be established by selecting different pairs of streamlines as walls. The elbows produced by the complex potential function selected are suitable for use in aircraft air-intake ducts. The droplet impingement data derived from the trajectories are presented along with equations in such a manner that the collection efficiency, the area, the rate, and the distribution of droplet impingement can be determined for any elbow defined by any pair of streamlines within a portion of the flow field established by the complex potential function. Coordinates for some typical streamlines of the flow field and velocity components for several points along these streamlines are presented in tabular form.
Date: September 1, 1953
Creator: Hacker, Paul T.; Brun, Rinaldo J. & Boyd, Bemrose
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impingement of Water Droplets on NACA 65A004 Airfoil and Effect of Change in Airfoil Thickness from 12 to 4 Percent at 4 deg Angle of Attack

Description: The trajectories of droplets in the air flowing past an NACA 65A004 airfoil at an angle of attack of 4 deg were determined. The amount of water in droplet form impinging on the airfoil, the area of droplet impingement, and the rate of droplet impingement per unit area on the airfoil surface were calculated from the trajectories and presented to cover a large range of flight and atmospheric conditions. The effect of a change in airfoil thickness from 12 to 4 percent at 4 deg angle of attack is presented by comparing the impingement calculations for the NACA 65A004 airfoil with those for the NACA 65(sub 1)-208 and 65(sub 1)-212 airfoils. The rearward limit of impingement on the upper surface decreases as the airfoil thickness decreases. The rearward limit of impingement on the lower surface increases with a decrease in airfoil thickness. The total water intercepted decreases as the airfoil thickness is decreased.
Date: November 1, 1953
Creator: Brun, Rinaldo J.; Gallagher, Helen M. & Vogt, Dorothea E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impingement of Water Droplets on an NACA 65(sub 1) -212 Airfoil at an Angle of Attack of 4 Deg

Description: The trajectories of droplets in the air flowing past an NACA 651-212 airfoil at an angle of attack of 40 were determined. The collection efficiency, the area of droplet impingement, and the rate of droplet impingement were calculated from the trajectories and are presented herein.
Date: September 10, 1952
Creator: Brun, Rinaldo J.; Serafini, John S. & Moshos, George J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Impingement of Water Droplets on NACA 65A004 Airfoil at 0 Deg Angle of Attack

Description: The trajectories of water droplets in the air flowing past an NACA 6511004 airfoil at a n angle of attack of 0 deg were determined. The amount of water in droplet form impinging on the airfoil , the area of droplet impingement, and the rate of droplet impingement per unit area on the airfoil surface were calculated from the trajectories and presented t o cover a large range of flight and atmospheric conditions. These impingement characteristics are compared briefly with those previously reported for the same airfoil at angles of attack of 4 deg and 8 deg.
Date: November 1, 1955
Creator: Brun, Rinaldo J. & Vogt, Dorothea E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Droplet Impingement and Ingestion by Supersonic Nose Inlet in Subsonic Tunnel Conditions

Description: The amount of water in cloud droplet form ingested by a full-scale supersonic nose inlet with conical centerbody was measured in the NACA Lewis icing tunnel. Local and total water impingement rates on the cowl and centerbody surfaces were also obtained. All measurements were made with a dye-tracer technique. The range of operating and meteorological conditions studied was: angles of attack of 0 deg and 4.2 deg, volume-median droplet diameters from about 11 to 20 microns, and ratios of inlet to free-stream velocity from about 0.4 to 1.8. Although the inlet was designed for supersonic (Mach 2.0) operation of the aircraft, the tunnel measurements were confined to a free-stream velocity of 156 knots (Mach 0.237). The data are extendable to other subsonic speeds and droplet sizes by dimensionless impingement parameters. Impingement and ingestion efficiencies are functions of the ratio of inlet to free-stream velocity as well as droplet size. For the model and range of conditions studied, progressively increasing the inlet velocity ratio from less than to greater than 1.0 increased the centerbody impingement efficiency and shifted the cowl impingement region from the inner- to outer-cowl surfaces, respectively. The ratio of water ingested by the inlet plane to that contained in a free-stream tube of cross section equal to that at the inlet plane also increased with increasing inlet velocity ratio. Theoretically calculated values of inlet water (or droplet) ingestion are in good agreement with experiment for annular inlet configurations.
Date: May 1958
Creator: Gelder, Thomas F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Dye-Tracer Technique for Experimentally Obtaining Impingement Characteristics of Arbitrary Bodies and a Method for Determining Droplet Size Distribution

Description: A dye-tracer technique has been developed whereby the quantity of dyed water collected on a blotter-wrapped body exposed to an air stream containing a dyed-water spray cloud can be colorimetrically determined in order to obtain local collection efficiencies, total collection efficiency, and rearward extent of impingement on the body. In addition, a method has been developed whereby the impingement characteristics obtained experimentally for a body can be related to theoretical impingement data for the same body in order to determine the droplet size distribution of the impinging cloud. Several cylinders, a ribbon, and an aspirating device to measure cloud liquid-water content were used in the studies presented herein for the purpose of evaluating the dye-tracer technique. Although the experimental techniques used in the dye-tracer technique require careful control, the methods presented herein should be applicable for any wind tunnel provided the humidity of the air stream can be maintained near saturation.
Date: March 1955
Creator: von Glahn, Uwe H.; Gelder, Thomas F. & Smyers, William H., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Comparison of Heat Transfer from Airfoil in Natural and Simulated Icing Conditions

Description: An investigation of the heat transfer from an airfoil in clear air and in simulated icing conditions was conducted in the NACA Lewis 6- by 9-foot icing-research tunnel in order to determine the validity of heat-transfer data as obtained in the tunnel. This investiation was made on the same model NACA 65,2-016 airfoil section used in a previous flight study, under similar heating, icing, and operating conditions. The effect of tunnel turbulence, in clear air and in icingwas indicated by the forward movement of transition from laminar to turbulent heat transfer. An analysis of the flight results showed the convective heat transfer in icing to be considerably different from that measured in clear air and. only slightly different from that obtained in the icing-research tunnel during simulated icing.
Date: September 1, 1951
Creator: Gelder, Thomas F. & Lewis, James P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Compressibility Effects on Heat Transfer and Pressure Drop in Smooth Cylindrical Tubes

Description: An analysis is made to simplify pressure-drop calculations for nonadiabatic and adiabatic friction flow of air in smooth cylindrical tubes when the density changes due to heat transfer and pressure drop are appreciable. Solutions of the equation of motion are obtained by the use of Reynolds' analogy between heat transfer and skin friction. Charts of the solutions are presented for making pressure-drop calculations. A technique of using the charts to determine the position of a normal shock in a tube is described.
Date: October 1, 1944
Creator: Nielsen, Jack N
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Experimental Investigation of Entrance-Region Heat-Transfer Coefficients

Description: Experimental results of tests made at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory are presented to show how heat-transfer coefficients can he increased by a method utilizing the high rate of heat transfer known to exist on any heat-transfer surface in the region adjacent to the edge on which the cooling or heating fluid impinges. The results show that, for the same pressure drop, the average surface heat-transfer.coefficient can be increased 50 to 100 percent when a cooling surface having a length of four inches in the direction of fluid flow is cut to form twenty fins with a length of 0.2 inch in the direction of fluid flow and the fins are sharpened and staggered in the air stream. The percentage of increase in the surface heat-transfer coefficient obtained as a result of shortening the length of the cooling surface varies with the pressure drop of the cooling fluid in passing the surface, the increase being largest when small pressure drop is used and smallest when high pressure drop is used.
Date: November 1, 1943
Creator: Joyner, Upshur T
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department