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General Engineering and Consulting Laboratory "Hot Service" Turbine Pump Progress Report: May 1 to June 15, 1948

Description: Introduction: "This report covers progress on the testing of the General Engineering and Consulting Laboratories Turbine Pump No. 1 from May 1, 1948 to Jun 15, 1948. All testing prior to April 30, 1948 has been described in Redox Experiment Testing Report No. 1 (Document HW-9474) and No. 2 (Document HW-9694)."
Date: June 21, 1948
Creator: Stringer, J. T. & Allen, A. W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Zirconium Pilot Plant Research and Development Progress Report

Description: The following report studies the effect of flow rates and deposition pressure on the zirconium deposition in the zirconium pilot plant with the use of a Hilco oil purifier for the vacuum pumps that permitted studies to continue through the month.
Date: November 20, 1951
Creator: Dryden, C. E.; Accountius, O. E.; Black, D. G.; Finney, B. C.; Gruber, B. A.; Jurevic, W. G. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Ultra-High Pressure Modeling and Experiments Review

Description: The RDHWT/MARIAH II energy addition, run time, and mass flow rate requirement simply large air and nitrogen fluid volumes at the highest practicable static enthalpy. The objective of the gas supply concept development is the satisfaction of ultra-high pressure (UHP), high temperature thermodynamic requirements in a facility with acceptable safety and economic risks. The primary challenges for the mechanical design are connecting multiple volumes at pressures greater than 1,400MPa and temperatures greater than 500 K; fabricating high strength steel sections approximately 2 m in typical dimension, and reacting the pressure-related forces in the system. In the 'octahedral module' concept, four UHP intensifiers and two UHP manifolds are arranged in an 'octahedral' geometry that results in acceptable deviatoric stresses at cross bores. Multiple modules join to provide the required UHP volume at a stagnation pressure of 2100MPa and stagnation temperature of 750 K.
Date: June 1, 2004
Creator: Costantino, M & Darnell, I
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Materials Reliability Program: Environmental Fatigue Testing of Type 304L Stainless Steel U-Bends in Simulated PWR Primary Water (MRP-137)

Description: Laboratory data generated in the past decade indicate a significant reduction in component fatigue life when reactor water environmental effects are experimentally simulated. However, these laboratory data have not been supported by nuclear power plant component operating experience. In recent comprehensive review of laboratory, component and structural test data performed through the EPRI Materials Reliability Program, flow rate was identified as a critical variable that was generally not considered in laboratory studies but applicable in plant operating environments. Available data for carbon/low-alloy steel piping components suggest that high flow is beneficial regarding the effects of a reactor water environment. Similar information is lacking for stainless steel piping materials. This report documents progress made to date in an extensive testing program underway to evaluate the effects of flow rate on the corrosion fatigue of 304L stainless steel under simulated PWR primary water environmental conditions.
Date: December 1, 2004
Creator: R.Kilian
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Laboratory experiments on dispersive transport across interfaces: The role of flow direction

Description: We present experimental evidence of asymmetrical dispersive transport of a conservative tracer across interfaces between different porous materials. Breakthrough curves are measured for tracer pulses that migrate in a steady state flow field through a column that contains adjacent segments of coarse and fine porous media. The breakthrough curves show significant differences in behavior, with tracers migrating from fine medium to coarse medium arriving significantly faster than those from coarse medium to fine medium. As the flow rate increases, the differences between the breakthrough curves diminish. We argue that this behavior indicates the occurrence of significant, time-dependent tracer accumulation in the resident concentration profile across the heterogeneity interface. Conventional modeling using the advection-dispersion equation is demonstrated to be unable to capture this asymmetric behavior. However, tracer accumulation at the interface has been observed in particle-tracking simulations, which may be related to the asymmetry in the observed breakthrough curves.
Date: April 1, 2009
Creator: Berkowitz, B.; Cortis, A.; Dror, I. & Scher, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Water-Level Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project

Description: This document presents the water-level monitoring plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project, conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Water-level monitoring of the groundwater system beneath the Hanford Site is performed to fulfill the requirements of various state and federal regulations, orders, and agreements. The primary objective of this monitoring is to determine groundwater flow rates and directions. To meet this and other objectives, water-levels are measured annually in monitoring wells completed within the unconfined aquifer system, the upper basalt-confined aquifer system, and in the lower basalt-confined aquifers for surveillance monitoring. At regulated waste units, water levels are taken monthly, quarterly, semi-annually, or annually, depending on the hydrogeologic conditions and regulatory status of a given site. The techniques used to collect water-level data are described in this document, along with the factors that affect the quality of the data and the strategies employed by the project to minimize error in the measurement and interpretation of water levels.
Date: September 7, 1999
Creator: McDonald, John P.; Chamness, Michele A. & Newcomer, Darrell R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Liquid metal Flow Meter - Final Report

Description: Measuring the flow of liquid metal presents serious challenges. Current commercially-available flow meters use ultrasonic, electromagnetic, and other technologies to measure flow, but are inadequate for liquid metal flow measurement because of the high temperatures required by most liquid metals. As a result of the reactivity and high temperatures of most liquid metals, corrosion and leakage become very serious safety concerns. The purpose of this project is to develop a flow meter for Lockheed Martin that measures the flow rate of molten metal in a conduit.
Date: January 30, 2007
Creator: Andersen C, Hoogendoom S, Hudson B, Prince J, Teichert K, Wood J, Chase K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Measuring Rates of Outdoor Airflow Into HVAC Systems

Description: During the last few years, new technologies have been introduced for measuring the flow rates of outside air into HVAC systems. This document describes one particular technology for measuring these airflows, a system and a related protocol developed to evaluate this and similar measurement technologies under conditions without wind, and the results of our evaluations. We conclude that the measurement technology evaluated can provide a reasonably accurate measurement of OA flow rate over a broad range of flow, without significantly increasing airflow resistance.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P. & Delp, Woody
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Quarterly Technical Progress Report

Description: Methane oxidative coupling experiments were conducted in a porous gamma alumina membrane reactor using Mn-W-Na/SiOz catalyst, and its performance was compared with a packed reactor. By varying the helium flow rate and keeping the temperature, methane flow rate, and oxygen flow rate constant, the membrane reactor gave 10% higher Cz yield and 30% higher C2 selectivity than the co-feed reactor operated at the same methane conversion. At similar C2 yield and C2 selectivity, the methane conversion of the membrane reactor was 15% lower than that of a co-feed reactor. By varying the oxygen flow rate and keeping the temperature, methane flow rate, and helium flow rate constant, at the same methane conversion, the membrane reactor gave about 3% higher C2 yield and C2 selectivity than the co-feed reactor. Higher helium flow rate gave higher C2 selectivity and yield, whereas changing methane flow rate did not significantly affect the reactor performance.
Date: August 29, 1997
Creator: Ma, Yi Hua
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Transcriptional Profiling Using the Flowthrough Genosensor

Description: A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation (Contractor) and Gene Logic, Inc., (Participant) was carried out to evaluate the technical feasibility study of the application of the flowthrough genosensor for gene expression (transcriptional) profiling, over the current industry practice of using flat surface hybridization arrays to monitor the relative abundance of individual mRNA species in a cell. Various parameters, including substrate preparation, flow rates, hybridization conditions and sample concentrations, were evaluated on the flowthrough genosensor. The superiority of the flowthrough genosensor, in terms of hybridization rate and sensitivity were established.
Date: September 27, 1999
Creator: Doktycz, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Gas Pipeline Pigability

Description: In-line inspection equipment is commonly used to examine a large portion of the long distance transmission pipeline system that transports natural gas from well gathering points to local distribution companies. A piece of equipment that is inserted into a pipeline and driven by product flow is called a ''pig''. Using this term as a base, a set of terms has evolved. Pigs that are equipped with sensors and data recording devices are called ''intelligent pigs''. Pipelines that cannot be inspected using intelligent pigs are deemed ''unpigable''. But many factors affect the passage of a pig through a pipeline, or the ''pigability''. The pigability pipeline extend well beyond the basic need for a long round hole with a means to enter and exit. An accurate assessment of pigability includes consideration of pipeline length, attributes, pressure, flow rate, deformation, cleanliness, and other factors as well as the availability of inspection technology. All factors must be considered when assessing the appropriateness of ILI to assess specific pipeline threats.
Date: April 1, 2004
Creator: Clark, Ted & Nestleroth, Bruce
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Short Term Climatological Wind Data as a Tool for Wind Forecasting

Description: Utilizing short-term climatological wind data can enhance wind speed and wind direction forecasts. An analysis of regional or tower-based wind rose summaries can be useful forecast guides especially when synoptic-scale pressure gradients are weak. Predictive data from multiple models can be plotted against short-term climatological wind data to assess deviations from expected norms and differences between forecast models. Site-specific comparisons between predicted data and observed climatological distributions can provide further insights to the forecaster. These methods can be applied to any location where sufficient climatological data (at least two years) is available.
Date: January 28, 2004
Creator: Parker, Matthew J.; Weber, Allen H. & Buckley, Robert L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

An Analysis of Wintertime Winds in Washington, D.C.

Description: This report consists of a description of the wintertime climatology of wind speed and wind direction around the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Meteorological data for this study were collected at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (Reagan National), Dulles International Airport (Dulles), and a set of surface meteorological stations that are located on a number of building tops around the National Mall. A five-year wintertime climatology of wind speed and wind direction measured at Reagan National and Dulles are presented. A more detailed analysis was completed for the period December 2003 through February 2004 using data gathered from stations located around the National Mall, Reagan National, and Dulles. Key findings of our study include the following: * There are systematic differences between the wind speed and wind direction observed at Reagan National and the wind speed and wind direction measured by building top weather stations located in the National Mall. Although Dulles is located much further from the National Mall than Reagan National, there is better agreement between the wind speed and wind direction measured at Dulles and the weather stations in the National Mall. * When the winds are light (less than 3 ms-1 or 7 mph), there are significant differences in the wind directions reported at the various weather stations within the Mall. * Although the mean characteristics of the wind are similar at the various locations, significant, short-term differences are found when the time series are compared. These differences have important implications for the dispersion of airborne contaminants. In support of wintertime special events in the area of the National Mall, we recommend placing four additional meteorological instruments: three additional surface stations, one on the east bank of the Potomac River, one south of the Reflecting Pool (to better define the flow within the Mall), and a …
Date: June 20, 2006
Creator: Berg, Larry K. & Allwine, K Jerry
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Methods of Measuring Lock-In Strength and their Application to the Case of Flow over a Cavity Locking into a Single Side Branch Resonator

Description: Lock-in is a non-linear interaction between a flow induced noise source and a resonator when their respective frequencies are near each other. Lock-in has been reported under many different labels and for many different applications. There is a need however for a consistent community wide method to measure the strength of lock-in so that data from different tests and different source/resonator combinations can be compared. This paper discusses three methods for measuring lock-in strength. The first, Resonant Response Method, (RRM) subtracts (in the decibel scale) the linear modal response of the resonator to broadband (BB) flow noise from the resonant response when lock-in occurs. The second, Quality Factor Method (QFM) tracks the change in quality factor of the resonant response. The third defines the strength in terms of the difference between peak response and the local BB levels. The RRM is applied to a fundamental test in water of a weak source from grazing flow over a cavity locking into acoustic resonant modes of a single side branch resonator. The major velocity effects are captured in the resonant response to BB flow and not in lock-in strength. However, Strouhal stage number and modal damping is shown to have a significant impact on strength. For two modes, strength versus flow rate using the RRM is compared to strengths obtained using the QFM; on a decibel scale the results are shown to be within experimental uncertainty. However, the QFM is noticeably more difficult to apply. The author recommends the use of the Resonant Response Method as the most tractable measure of lock-in strength.
Date: April 16, 2003
Creator: Mendelson, Richard S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Dehumidification: Prediction of Condensate Flow Rate for Plate-Fin Tube Heat Exchangers Using the Latent j Factor

Description: Condensate flow rate is an important factor in designing dehumidifiers or evaporators. In this paper, the latentj fimtor is used to analyze the dehumidification performance of two plate-fin tube heat exchangers. This latent j factor, analogous to the total j factor, is a flmction of the mass transfa coefllcient, the volumetric air flow rate, and the Schmidt number. This latent j factor did predict condensate flow rate more directly and accurately than any other sensiblej factor method. The Iatentj factor has been used in the present study because the sensible j factor correlations presented in the literature failed to predict the condensate flow rate at high Reynolds numbers. Results show that the latent j i%ctor em be simply correlated as a fhnction of the Reynolds number based on the tube outside diameter and number of rows of the heat exchanger.
Date: March 15, 1999
Creator: Baxter, V. D.; Chen, D. T. & Conklin, J. C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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FLOW ANALYSIS OF DIFFUSER-GETTER-DIFFUSER SYSTEMS

Description: Tritium clean-up systems typically deploy gas processing technologies between stages of palladium-silver (Pd/Ag) diffusers/permeators. The number of diffusers positioned before and after a gas clean-up process to obtain optimal system performance will vary with feed gas inert composition. A simple method to analyze optimal diffuser configuration is presented. The method assumes equilibrium across the Pd/Ag tubes and system flows are limited by diffuser vacuum pump speeds preceding or following the clean-up process. A plot of system feed as a function of inert feed gas composition for various diffuser configuration allows selection of a diffuser configuration for maximum throughput based on feed gas composition.
Date: July 24, 2007
Creator: Klein, J & Dave W. Howard, D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Simultaneous Production of High-Purity Hydrogen and Sequestration-Ready CO2 from Syngas: Computer Model Development

Description: Two computer modules are being constructed to model a new process for syngas upgrading and purification. The first module simulates the physical processes occurring in a fluid bed reactor where both gas and solid compositions and flow rates vary significantly along the axis of the reactor. The second module simulates the chemistry and mass transfer between the gas and solid phases. Primitive forms of the two modules have been developed and exercised over a range of performance parameters. These early tests verify that the modules will need to be expanded to model the reactors as series of individual zones in order to attain satisfactory predictive performance.
Date: July 24, 2000
Creator: Cole, Jerald A.; Hernandez, Arnold D.; Kumar, Ravi V. & Wildmer, Neil C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2009 water year

Description: The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 73 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs— two that flow into Cañon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.
Date: May 1, 2010
Creator: Ortiz, David & McCullough, Betsy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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